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Full text of "The mission herald [serial]"



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THIS MONTH. 

The Bishop's Letter. 

News of the Churches. 

Further News About the Qen= 
eral Convention. 

Departments. 




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5anuar^, 1926 



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Published by the Diocese of East Carolina at Plymouth, N. C. 



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THE MISSION HERALD. 



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uaint f7/ari/*i^ Ochool^ 

A' JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Rev. WARREN W. WAY, Rector. 

An Episcopal School for Girls. Four years High School and two 
years College Courses. Accredited. Special courses: Music, Art, 
Expression, Home Economics, Business. 

MODERN EQUIPMENT— 20 ACRE CAMPUS. 

Advent session opens Sept. 15, 1925. For catalogue address: 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager, Raleigh N. C. 



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v)/. ^ aul s vJcAoo/y 

^Jjeau/ort, ^Y. C 



An elementaiT and preparatory school for hoys and girls 
Lovely location on coast of North Carolina; healthful cli- 
mate; comfortable rooni>s; wholesome' food; daily prayer; 
preparation for college; athletics; piano; band and orchestra — 
— a home atmosphere fostered. 
Accommodation for 50 boarders. 

For further information apply to, 

MR. E. P. DUNCAN, Principal. 




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O 



Read The 

Soutbern Cburcbman 

ESTABLISHED 1835: 
A NATIONAL CHURCH PAPER OF 

INTEREST TO ALL THE FAMILY. 

News of the Dioceses and ?\Iission Fields; Editorials :ind lEform- 
ing Articles; Family and Young People's Departments; Christianity 
and the Community; The Great Commission. 

I'cu will enjoy its weekly visits. Subscription $3.00 a year. 



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SOUTHERN CHURCHMAN CO. 



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112 North Fifth Street. 



^^ .- —■^—-'^ -^~ - ^ — ^ -t^^ ^ .---..■ ^ 1 Q ^- 



RICHMOND, VA. 



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C^urrl ^WVX%\XXi^Xm all materials 

ALTARS,PULPITS,LECTEi ,^ii,F0NTS,FABRICS,EMBR0IDERIE5 

Memorial Table ts, Stained Glass W indows.^ 



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VIRGINIA 
EPISCOPAL SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 

Prepares boys at cost for Col- 
lege and University. Modern 
equipment. Healthy location In 
the mountains of Virginia. Cost 
moderate, made possible through 
generosity of founders. For cat- 
alogue apply to 

R(!v,l,i].Wlei,'0.0. 

Rector 






Church Furnishings. 1 




Gold, Wilver'anri Brass 

t'hurch k (fliancel Furniture 

Write foi' Catalogue 
for Episcopal Churches 

W. & E. SCHMIDT CO. 

.SOS Tliird Street. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

_^^ '1.--'^:-'^^ — -^ 'Ir- — ^^^-"^ -; 



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The Bank of Edenton. 



1 



SAFETY FOR SAVINGS. 



Bank with us bv mall. 
JITLTEN WOOD, President. 
W. O. ELLIOTT, Vice-President 
D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 



Church Vestments 

Cassocks, Surplices. Stoles 
EMBROIDERIES, CLERICAL 
SUITS, SILKS, CLOTHS, 
FRINGES 




HATS, RABATS, COLLARS 



Cox Sons & Vining 

1.31-133 East 23rd St , NEW YORK 



\ HONNET 

I 1867 

►\ WILMINGTON, N. C. 

( 

^ ^ --■^-~ ^^ — -^ — '^ — -^ -*• -^ -^ - 



\ NASH BROTf 

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IbOOK AND MAGAZINE PRINTINGr/ 
^ GOLDSBORO, N. C. V 



The Mission Herald 



Vol. XL. 



PLYMOUTH N. C. JANUARY. 1926. 



No. I 



CHURCH KALENDAR JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1926. 



to 



'"O live ye by the Kalendar, 

And with the good ye dwell; 

The Spirit that came down on them 

Will Lighten you as well." — Bishop Coxe. 



Feby. 



Jany. 24 — Third Sunday after Epiphany 
25 — Conversion of St. Paul 
31 — S'eptuagesima Sunday 
2— Purification B. V. M. 
7 — Sexagesima Sunday 
14 — -Quinquagesima Sunday 
17 — Ash Wednesday 
21 — ^First S'unday in Lent 
24— St. Matthias 



(Green) 
(Whitej 
(Violet) 
(White) 
(Violet 
(Violet) 
(Violet) 
(Violet) 
(Red) 



The Bishop's Letter. 



In my last letter I told of my visit to Fairfield on De- 
cember the first, and of the Ordination of the Rev. O. J. 
McLeod on the second. The Rev. Mr. Gardner's thrilling 
story of our return from Fairfield has attracted wide atten- 
tion, not only in the Diocese, but in many other sections 
•of the country where the Mission Herald ftnda its way. 

On S'unday the sixth, I preached in Holy Trinity, Hert- 
ford, at 11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m., confirmiug seven persons 
at the morning service. The rector of Holy Trinity, Rev. 
E. T'. Jillson was confined to his room wilh a touch of In- 
fluenza during my stay in Hertford and his inability to be 
with us in the service was keenly regretted. I have been 
glad to learn that he has almost entirely recovereu from 
his recent illness. One of the pleasant features of my 
day in Hertford was the presence at the evening service 
of the Rev. George F. Hill, and many of his parishioners 
from Christ Church, Elizabeth City. 

On Tuesday, the eighth, I attended a meeting of the Field 
Department of the National Council at the Church Mission 
House, New York. The reports at this meeting were the 
most hopeful of any that I have heard since 1 became a 
member of the Department six years ago. 

On Sunday, the thirteenth, I preached and Celebrated 
Holy Communion in £'t. Paul's Church, Edenton, at 11 a. m. 

In the afternoon I preached in the Chowan High School 
Auditorium at Meege, and at night I preached and confirm- 
ed ten persons, presented by the rector. Rev. Robert B. 
Drane, D.D., in St. Paul's Church, Edenton. 

On the morning of the fourteenth, I visited St. John's 
Colored Parochial School, Edenton, and made an address. 

On Tuesday, the fifteenth, I presided at a Special Com- 
mittee meeting, in £'t. Mary's School, Raleigh. 

On Sunday morning, the twentieth, I preached and con. 
firmed three persons presented by the Rector, Rev. W. O. 
Cone in S't. Stephen's Church, Goldsboro. 

On the evening of the twentieth I preached and confirm- 
ed four persons, presented by the Rector, Rev. Dr. John 
Hartley, in St. Mary's Church, Kinston. 

On Monday morning, the twenty-first, I baptized and 
confirmed one person and made an address in Christ Church 
New Bern. 

At noon on the same day I confirmed one person in pri- 
vate for Christ Church, New Bern. 

The people of Christ Church are delighted with the ser- 
vice of their temporary minister, Rev. Richard B. Doherty, 



of New York, and we are hoping that he likes us well 
enough to consider a permanent rectorship in East Caro- 
lina later on. 

We are all rejoicing over the acceptance of the Rev. 
Guy H. Madara, who was called to the rectorship of Christ 
Church, New Biern, some weeks ago. Mr. Madara, who 
began his ministry as a Missionary in Alaska and who 
has been serving in the Diocese of Newark for the past 
seven years, is one of the ablest of the younger clergy of 
our Church, and we know that he will make his life and 
ministry count for helpful and constructive things in New 
Bern and in the Diocese. 

He expects to enter upon his duties on February the 
nrsi, and we extend to him, Mrs. Madara and Miss Madara 
a cordial and loving welcome to East Carolina. 

On Christmas Day I had the sweet privilege or attending 
services with my family in St. James' Church, Wilmington. 
May I take the opportunity of saying how truly I appreciat- 
ed the many Christmas greetings that came to me from 
members of my beloved Diocesan family at Christmas time. 

On the afternoon of S'unday, the twenty-seventh, I preach- 
ed in All Souls' Chapel, North West, and at night I preach- 
ed and confirmed two persons, presented by the rector. 
Rev. John B. Gibble in the Church of the Good Shepherd, 
W'ilmington. 

As my annual address to the Convention will take the 
place of the usual "Bishop's Letter" next month, I will 
tell you at this time of some of my January activities. 

On Sunday morning, January the third, 1 preached in 
St. Andrew's Church, Wrightsville Sound. 

On Tuesday, the fifth, 1 took part in the Consecration 
as Bishop of Arizona, of the Rev. Walter Mitchell, D.D., 
in Christ Church Pro Cathedral, Trenton, New Jersey. 

On Ihursday, the seventh, I attended a meeimg of the 
Board of Managers of the Thompson Orphanage in Char- 
lotte. 

The meeting was held in the Living Room of the beauti- 
ful new Kenan Cottage. You will recall that the twenty- 
one thousand dollars used in the construction of this Cot- 
tage was given by Mrs. S'arah Kenan, of Wilmington, in 
memory of her sister. 

We are looking forward with much joy to the meeting 
of our Diocesan Convention in St. John's, Wilmington, 
on the twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh, and earnestly hope 
that every parish and mission may be represented at that 
meting. 

Looking forward to seeing many of my readers at that 
time, I am, faithfully. 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



MR. COX'S SPLENDID WORK AT GRACE CHURCH, 
NEWPORT NEWS. 



The friends and relatives in East Carolina of the Rev. 
Harvey A. Cox will learn with pleasure of the fine response 
which he has secured in his new parish, Grace Church, 
Newport News. In his annual report to the congregation, 
a copy of which we have seen, Mr. Cox called attention to 
the fact that the communicant list grew from 51 to 103 dur- 
ing the year, with a corresponding increase in the Sunday 
S'chool and other organizations. Mr. Cox, who went to 
Newport News from Red Springs, is a native of East 
Carolina, and has many friends here who will be glad to 
hear of his good work. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



A MESSAGE TO ALL OF US FROM OUR NEW 

PRESIDING BISHOP 



My dear Brethren in Christ and His Church: 

This year is new to us in many ways. On its threshold 
I greet you all with a heart full at affection tor you and a 
soul strong with confidence in you. 

THE EPISCOPATE. 

As 1 meditate upon the sacred relations that bind us to- 
gether in the l^orcl, my thougnts turn ttrst to you, my dear 
brethren of the Episcopate, in you the lite ot the Church 
has continuity of witness. 

Under God, you have designated me as your chief Ad- 
ministrator and Executive in the affairs oi the Church. 
■• 1 ou have chosen me, and ordained me that 1 should bring 
lorcu Iruit that will remain." 

Impelled of God, and with a irust waoiiy stayed on Him, I 
am in fear and tremoling assuming the responsibility you 
have thus laid upon me. 

but, in declaring your choice, you had no intent of 
translerring to me your own obligations, individual or col- 
lective. In that sense you all knew then, and know now, that 
every man of you"shall bear his own burden," in the Lord. 

Your only motive was to make me the "Binder" of an 
together, so that the work of each will become the concern 
of everyone and thus enable us to ''fulfill the law of Christ," 
by "bearing one another's burdens." 

For this cause we are ONE and only ONE in our alle- 
giance to the Master, in our loyalty to the Church, and in 
our love for the brethren committed to our Diocesan care. 

As one with me, you shall all, continually, know of my 
purposes and plans. 

Please God, as one with you, I shall also be kept informed 
of yours, so that thus bound together we can unitedly 
strive to feed, not only our own sheep, but, to the extent 
we legitimately may, the "other sheep which are not of 
this fold," and thus hasten the day when according to the 
will of the "Good Shepherd" "there shall be one fold and 
one shepherd." 

"Fathers, I write unto you, because ye have known Him 
that is from the beginning." 

PRIEST AND DEACONS'. 

And then, upon you, my dear Brethren of the Ministry, 
in Parochial vocation, do I find myself meditating day and 
night. Only through you can your Bishops accomplish 
their perfect work. With them you share the responsibility 
of sponsorship for me by the vote of your Order in the 
House of Deputies, confirming their choice. Consequently 
and confidently, I look to you for SPONSOR favor and 
cooperation. 

The relation you sustain to your own Bishops, respect- 
ively, you also have with me through them collectively, 
and while they and I may chart the sea, map out the 
routes, and designate the destined port, you must con- 
duct the voyagers through calm and sunshine, through 
storm and tempest to the haven where they would be. We 
are but the harbor pilots. You are really the ship captains. 

And so, because I say it in affectionate friendship and 
with loving sympathy, I say with the greater liankncss 
that in your hands, supremely, humanly considered, is the 
welfare of our sacred cause: and that upon your loyalty, 
love and consecration in the discharge of the duties and 
enjoyment of the privileges of your high calling, de- 
pends absolutely the full success of our mutual endeavor 
for the welfare of the world and the glory of God through 
His Church. 



"Brethren, I write no new commandment unto you, but 
an old commandment which ye had from the beginning." 

THE WHOLE BODY OP THE CHURCH. 

And now, my dear brethren of the Laity, men, women, 
anu ciiildren, you are also SPONSOR for me by ihe Gen- 
eral Convention action of your Order, and are now the 
locus of all I have written. 

To me, in you supremely centers the importance of what 
I have said and to you I look to clothe it with significance 
and afford it justification. For "who is Paul and who is 
Apollos, but ministers by whom ye believed, even as the 
ijord gave to every man?" 

Our worth as your Bishops, Priests and Deacons, is de- 
termined by the measure of your belief. The value of your 
belief is measured by the nature of your works. Your 
worivs are made manifest, and are the expression not 
only of your faith, but also declare the fact of your worth 
i.r woithlessness. 

In you the Church lives and moves and has Her being. 
The manner of your life, the method ot your movement 
and tue measure of your contribution of time, talent, toil 
and treasure, for the amelioration of human iils, the sal- 
vation of eternal souls and the glory of tue Triune God, 
witness to heaven and earth for the whole Body. 

Your testimony declares not only whether YOU are 
working with perishable material of "wood, hay, stubble," 
or with imperishable substance of "gold, silver, precious 
stones"; but also proclaims whether WE, your Bishops 
Priests and Deacons, together with you, "have a name to 
live, but are dead" — our works not being found perfect be- 
fore God, — or whether we are "laborers together with God, ' 
and are so building upon the "One Foundation" "that our 
work shall abide." 

In working the Will of Christ, as were the Thessalouians 
to ft. Paul, so "ye are (to us) our glory and joy," and, 
upon every thought of you, my prayer is that in and 
through you the Divine Will may so work that "our glory 
and joy" shall be full. 

"I write unto you (men and women and children), be- 
cause ye have known the Father and are strong." 

And so, my dear brethren, one and all, with the assur- 
ance of this our universal Oneness with God for the accom- 
plishment of His will through the medium of His work, 
whom shall we fear, or who shall make us afraid? Our 
present is well in hand, our future will be what we make 
it. "All things are ours" for prudent use in pious purposes, 
and please God, we shall not only practice prudence but 
also prefer and pursue piety in our united endeavor for 
Divine accomplishment. 

In the different Orders of our common ministry in the 
Church of God, we find no division of interest, no diversity 
of aim, no confusion of authority. We have but one Mas- 
ter, and under Him we all are controlled by one motive. 
We have one common desire to do with all the force ot 
our will, abilities and powers, our duty, severally and 
unitedly, in that particular position of stewardship in 
which it has pleased God to place us for service in His 
name. 

"Being many, we are one body in Christ, and everyone 
members one of another. Having then gifts differing ac- 
cording to the grace that is given to us, let us wait on 
our ministei'ing: he that giveth, let him do it with simplic- 
ity; he that ruleth, with diligence." But, above all, let 
"love be without dissimulation." 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



MY MEMORY PICTURES OF THE MISSIONARIES IN 
NEW ORLEANS. 



(By MRS. GUY C. SMALL.) 

As I was sitting before the open fire, thinking over as I 
have often lately, the various events of the New Orleans 
Convention, it flashed into my mind that no one so far 
had written about the wonderful missionaries, and their 
talks as I heard them down there. 

As I looked into the coals, each one by one seemed mir- 
rored in my mind. They stood before me in turn, forceful 
or winsome or appealing, all so convincing, both the men 
and the women. First, I seemed to see Miss Grace Lindley, 
Executive 8'ecretary of the Woman's Auxiliary. Long after 
I had retired on the night of the meeting of the .Announce- 
ment of the U. T. O., I could hear Miss Lindley :; sweet 
voice repeating: "I was first impressed over there in Japan 
and China with the noisy clapping of wooden shoes upon 
the wharves and the pattering of bare feet up the streets — 
masses of restless humanity — all so different c.nri yet so 
like us. I make this appeal for the Orient, for all over 
the world, suffering womanhood, and motherhood is the 
same. Let us think how they are like us, hov/ these Orient- 
als imitate us. Let us strive to give them cnjy the Good 
that is in us to imitate." 

And I could hear again, as on that first niglit Bishop 
Overs' challenge to us all: "The door of Tjiberia is open — 
it is for you to send the workers." Again Bisho]) McKim 
in memory stood before me, and I heard his voire saying, 
"As I knelt there in the ruins of Tokyo after the earth- 
quake, I heard a voice say to me just as iilalnly "Fear not 
for I am with you, I will never forsake thee." It was the 
voice of God, and Bishop McKim rose from the ruins with 
fresh ardor in his heart, and not a Christian dssertcd him." 
they were just purified and strengthened oy ihis great dis- 
aster because the Work was bnilt on the Rociv of .\ges. 

Next came Miss Bessie Blacknell, whose old l;ome is in 
Henderson, N. C, but who has worked faitht'iilly at Nenana, 
Alaska for nine years. I can hear her tell of the little Chris- 
tian Indian girl, who when told she should not have walked 
home alone from the mill, answered, "Why I was not afraid 
because God was with me." Then came Bi?'iop Matoda's 
appeal: "If only you fine American ladies wnaln come over 
to .Japan — all the wealthy homes there wotild be open to you 
and in this way you could reach the nigh-cicus Jai)s.!ese 
ladies and teach them Christianity, where I can not reach 
them." 

There followed next in my mind's picture, Miss Anne 
Cady, of Fort Defiance, Arizona. I can recall tb'? sw-5st 
expression of her face as she described her work among 
the Navajo Indian children, who had such fea/fiil trachoma 
in their eyes. Miss Cady said: "First we give light to 
their eyes, by healing them, and then we give li.ght '.o their 
souls." 

Arch-Deacon Fred Drane, from Bdenton, who his worked 
so earnestly in Alaska, stood before me. He 'old about 
the faith of a Christian group of Indians way ,;n on the 
.Arctic Circle. When they were starving, they aijpo'iied to 
God for food; it was not long before they beheld upon that 
snowy frozen plain a strange flock of mountain sheep, of 
a specias never before seen by them, nor by the naturalists 
who later examined them. They had a peculiar red hand 
upon their backs. So it seemed as if God's hand was in ■■■.e 
innident and their prayers were answered. 

Bishop Morris, of the Canal Zone, Panama, followed next. 
We heard about his visits to the American boys working 
down there on the engineering jobs for the IT. ?. govern- 
ment. How lonesome they were, far removed from any 
Cbur'-h service, and how eager they were to have Bishop 
Morris come over to talk to them; and yet he wondered 
whether his talks left any lasting impression upon th.o.^e 
boys. 

And lastly into my mind, came the picture of .Miss 



Blanche Adams, the tiniest Deaconess attending the Goti- 
vention. She was again telling me how she lived and work- 
ed among the coal miners of Lee County, Virginia, and 
how after a busy day she would go back to her little home, 

where she lives all alone — ^open the door, light the lamp, 
and build her own fire, with no one to molest her as she 
earnestly works in God's vineyard. 



CHURCH OF THE ADVENT, WILLIAMSTON, ENTER- 
TAINS. 



WOMEN HAVE EN.JOYABLE GET-TO-GETHER 
MEETING. 

(Crowded out of December Issue.) 

Accepting the invitation of the women of the Chtirch 
of the Advent, Williamston. and their Rector, the Rev. 
C. O. Pardo, a number of visitors from near-by parishes 
attended an all-day meeting in Williamston on Tuesday, 
Be' ember first, to their great profit and enjoyment. It was 
a. get-to-gether meeting that followed no District lines, for 
representatives were present from Washington, Windsor, 
Greenville, Farmville, Hamilton, and Plymouth. Present 
with the women were a number of clergymen, including 
Rev. Messrs. J. E. W. Cook, J. W. Heyes, Theodore Par- 
trick, .Jr., and A. J. Mackie. 

The day's program properly began wihh a service of the 
Holy Communion in the Church of the Advent, with the 
Rev.'J. E. W. Cook as Celebrant. He was assisted by Rev. 
Messrs. J. W. Heyes and A. J. Mackie. Mr. Cook preached 
a most helpful sermon at this service. 

Following the service the women began iheir meetii'g 
in the Church. Upon request of the Rector, Mrs. Richard 
Williams. President of the Convocation o'r Eoentou, pre- 
sided. Mr. Pardo gave an address of welcome to the visi- 
tors on behalf of the women of the Pa.r&h, and Mrs. 
Williams made a happy response. Mrs. James G. Staton, 
1 resident of the Wom_an's Auxiliary of the Diocese, made 
an address, dealing paruict.-arly with the vvorh of the Gen- 
eral Convention. She gave a report of the great inspira- 
tional services of the Convention, but spoke especially 
of the Tri-ennial meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary. Slie 
presented the challenge of a great opportunity to the wo- 
men present. 

Between the morning and afternoon session a most 
bountiful lunch was served by the women of the Parish 
in the parish house. Both the service and the menu de- 
lighted the visitors. 

The afternoon session was opened with an address on 
"peace" by Mrs. Guy S'mall, of Washington. Mrs. Small, 
a visitor to the recent meeting of the General Convention 
in New Orleans, based her address on information and 
inspiration she received there, and it was most helpful. 
The Rev. Theodore Partrick. Jr., a deputy to the General 
Convention, gave an address in which he spoke of the 
outstanding events of the Convention. He ur.ged the wo- 
men to inform themselves as to the program adopted by 
the Church, and to give their whole-hearted support to it. 

Acting upon a special request, the Rev. J. W. Heyes, 
explained the "Get-to-Gether idea" as it is so successfully 
carried out in Pitt County. Mrs. William von Eberstein, 
of Washington, being called on to make some remarks, 
spoke of the box work for the year. She also offered a 
resolution, thanking the Rector and women of the Church 
of the Advent for the enjoyment and inspiration of the 
day. 

An enjoyable feature of the afternoon program was a 
duet sung by Mrs, Rhodes, of the Church of the Advent 
choir, and Mr. Pardo. 



Mr. William H. R. Jackson, of the DuBose Training 
School, will serve the churches at Southport and Whiteville 
during his vacation, beginning the first Sunday in January. 



THE MISSION HERAIJ). 







rr-m:f'"i,-' -' 




SKETCH OF ST. PAUL'S, EDENTON. 



(Editor's note: A pamphlet containing a picture of old 
S't. Paul's Church, Edenton, and the following sketch was 
recently prepared and distributed by the Rector, the Rev. 
R. B. Drane. We are glad to have the opportunity of 
re-producing it.) 

This Church building is the third in order of those 
built in Edenton, or near by, for the Mother Church of the 
Parish, in distinction from "Chapels of Ease", of which 
there were several within Chowan Precinct. That Precinct 
was far more extensive than the present* County of 
Chowan. 

The first Church, 1701 (same year in which the Parish 
was organized) was located about a mile from Edenton, 
on the Hayes lands: it was "twenty-five feet long, with 
posts in the ground." 

The second, 1708, was forty feet long by twenty-four 
wide: possibly it was an enlargement of the first, on the 
same site. 

In 1736 this present building was begun. Its dimensions 
are here given, together with those of two others of that 
period: 

St. Thomas's, Bath, 1734: Length, 51 feet, width, 31 
feet; height, 14 feet; thickness ©f walls, 2 feet 4 inches. 

St. Paul's, Edenton, 1736: Length, 60 feet; width, 40 
feet 3 Inches; height, 18 feet 6 inches; thickness of walls, 
2 feet 6 inches. 

St. Phillip's, Brunswick, about 1750: Length, 76 feet 6 
inches; width, 54 feet 3 inches; height, 25 feet 4 inches; 
thickness of walls, 3 feet. 

The bricks in St. Thomas's walls are 3x4 1-2x9 in. 

The bricks in St. Paul's walls are 2 1-2x2 3-4x8 1-2 in. 
Where they came from is not indicated. 

The tower walls of St. Pauls are three feet thick. 

The First Vestry of St. Paul's Parish, 1701, were "The 
Honorable Henderson Walker, Esqr., Coll. Thomas Pollock, 
William Duckenfiekl, Esqr., Mr. Nicholas Crisp, Mr. Ed- 
ward S'mithwick, Mr. John Blount, Mr. James Long, Mr. 
Nathanael Chevin, Mr. William Banbury, Coll. William 
Wilkinson, Capt. Thomas Leuten, Capt. Thomas Blount." 
They met and organized at the house of Mr. Thomas 
Gilliam. 

Clergymen named as in charge or officiating. Rev. Messrs. 
Dr. John Blair 1703; Henry Gerrard 1705; William Gor- 
don 1708; Newman 1723; Dr. .lohn Blacknall 1725; 

— — Fountain 172S; Marsden 1728; Robinson 

1730; Jones 1730; Granbill 1730; — Boyd 1732; 



John Garzia 1736; Clement Hall 1745; Daniel Earl 1759; 
Charles Pettigrew 1775; Frederick W. Hatch 1811; John 
Avery 1828; Wm. D. Cairns 1836; Samuel I. Johnston 
1837; Francis W. Hilliard 1866; Angelo A. Benton 1870; 
Wm. W. Lord 1876; Robert B. Drane 1876. 

The Minutes of the Vestry begin in 1701. In 1713, in a 
letter to the "Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 
in Foreign Parts," the Vestry declare that they have "no 
ornaments belonging to a Church"; they refer to the Li- 
brary of Books sent to Bath, which they claim should have 
come to them. That was the first Public Library in this 
Providence; one of the books is now held by the Diocese of 
East Carolina. 

On the 19th of June, 1776 (fifteen days before the 4th 
cf July National De^'laration of Inde])endence) this Vestry 
signed "The Test," a political declaration adopted by the 
North Carolina Provincial Congress at Hillsborough, 23rd 
of August, 1775: it professes allegiance to the King, and 
goes on to declare that "the people of this Province, singly 
and colle'^tively, are bound by the Acts and Resolutions 
of the Continental and Provincial Congresses, because in 
both they are freely represented by persons chosen by 
themselves": signed by Richd. Hoskins. David Rice, Pela- 
tinh Walton. William Hinton. Thomas Bonner, William 
Boyd, Thomas Benbury, Jacob Hunter, John Beasley, 
Willm. Bennet, William Roberts. The record breaks off 
later in 1776. 

In 1837, the North Gallery of the Church was appropriate 
ed for the use of the Coloured People; and in 1841 there 
was a movement for a Chapel for them. The Parish Reg- 
ister shows much attention given to the spiritual welfare 
of the Slaves. 

In 1852, provision was made for certain Pews to be free; 
most of them were rented. Fince 1876 they have all been 
free. 

During the war between the States, St. Paul's Church 
Bell was given to the Southern Confederacy, and it was 
one of the bells cast into four Cannon of the "Edenton 
Bell Battery." Later Miss Annie Page gave the bell now 
in use. 

In 1838 — "The Committee exhibit a plan of altering the 
present Pews into Single Pews, and repairing the Church" 
as we have it. 

About 1850, the Chancel was re-arranged: the stained 
glass window and the Altar, etc., put in as a Memorial to 
Josiah Collins. The oak was from England. 

"Tbis is none other but the House of God, and this is 
the Gate of Heaven." Gen. xxvii:17. 
192.5. 



MR. HAYES, PRESIDENT OF FARMVILLE MINISTERIAL 
ASSOCIATION. 



At a recent meeting of the Farmville Ministerial Associa. 
tion, the Rev. J. W. Heyes, Rector of Emmanuel Church, 
was elected president for the ensuing year. Mr. Heyes 
has been very active in promoting the affairs of the Asso- 
ciation during his residence in Farmville, and this election 
is a compliment to his ministry. 

Prom a newspaper account of the meeting we note that 
the Association arranges for daily religious exercises at 
the public school, each minister of the group taking his turn 
for a week. 

Taking note of the fact that a new pastor was coming 
to the Farmville Baptist Church, the Association planned 
for a service of welcome. Mr. Heyes was named master of 
ceremonies. We notice that this custom of giving a com- 
munity welcome to new ministers is general in Pitt County. 



The Rev. E. T. Jillson, Rector of Holy Trinity, Hertford, 
w-as prevented by illness from meeting some of his ap- 
pointments in December, but his friends wlil he glad to 
hear that he has recovered. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



DISTRICT MEETING HELD IN ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, 
FAISON, NOVEMBER 19, 1925. 



(Crowded out of last issue) 

The members ot ttie Woman's Auxiliary of St. Gabriel'^ 
Cnurcii, liaison, regretted tUat tue Convocation of VVil- 
mingLon did not meet this fall but were glad that it gave 
them tue opportunxiy or having a ursirict iVieeiing. The 
meeting was largely attended and the following places 
were represented: Goldsboro, Mount Olive, Clintun, Bur- 
gaw, Warsaw, Wallace, Turkey and i^'aison. Tne meeting 
was opened with prayer by our Rector, the Rev. HerDeit 
Gone. Alter the singing of the hymn Holy, Holy, Holy, 
the meeting was conducted by our Convocatioual Presi- 
dent, Mrs. £'. P. Adams. Mrs. O. L. McCullen most cord- 
ially welcomed those attending the meeting; the response 
was made by Mrs. W. F. Murphy, of Wallace. The Presi- 
dent of the Convocation gave a very interesting summary 
of the work which had been done in the Convocation this 
year and also stated that more summer work had been re- 
ported than ever before. 

Our youngest society is Grace Church Guild, Whiteville, 
just organized. Mrs. Woolvin, our Diocesan Treasurer of 
the United Thank Offering, gave a most interesting ad- 
dress on the U. T. O. She also said it was a real joy to 
know the great service that the "Little Blue Box" is ren- 
dering. We were most fortunate in having the Reverend 
Alexander Miller, Dean of the Convocation of Wilming- 
ton, and our Executive Secretary, Rev. W. R. Noe, with 
us. Mr. Miller conducted the Noon Day Service, after 
which he told us of the interesting meeting which Bishop 
Darst had with his clergy the day before in Goldsboro. 
We rejoiced greatly when Mr. Miller announced that the 
Wilmington Convocation would meet in Trenton next fall. 
Mr. Noe gave us a most helpful talk on the Church's Pro- 
gram and explained how the "Program" is made. Mrs. 
Adams explained the special work which we are asked to 
do in the Apportionment Plan, also explained the Box 
Work and urged that more work be done, tlirough the 
Church Periodical Club. We were asked to read our Church 
papers more and to see that a Secretary was appointed 
in our parishes for the Mission Herald and the Spirit ot 
Missions. 

It was a great disappointment to us when a telegram was 
received from Mrs. Staton saying that she could not be 
present. Mrs. Adams in the absence of Mrs. Staton gave 
us a most interesting account of the meeting recently held 
in New Orleans. It was quite a privilege to nave Mrs. 
Adams explain "The Message" to us, also the "Corporate 
Gift" of $100,000.00 for advance work, which the women 
of the Church will work for during the next three years. 
A chart giving the names of the places where this money 
will be given and the amounts made it very clear to us. 

We were more than pleased to hear of the growth of 
the Whitsunday Birthday Thank Offering, $21,339.46. East 
Carolina's part in that offering from the Church Schools 
was $500.00. Think what it might have been if each 
Church S'chool in our Diocese had had a part in this work. 
The offering at the end of the next three years will be 
given to the Hooker S'chool in Mexico. 

It was a very great pleasure to us to hear about the won- 
derful address that our Bishop made in New Orleans at 
the closing service of the Woman's Auxiliary held in St. 
George's Church. 

We felt that we were very fortunate in bavins: so many 
visitors attend our meeting, and the presence of the Meth- 
odist and Presbyterian ministers added very much to our 
pleasure. A most cordiali invitation was given to all 
visitors and to those who had come to attend the meeting 
to a Luncheon which was served at the home of Mrs. W. 
I. Thompson. 

St. Paul Church, Clinton, asked to have a District Meet- 
ing after our Annual Meeting in January. After the dis- 
tribution of some Church Literature. Mrs. Loftin Kerr from 



Clinton expressed the appreciation of all present for their 
great hospitality and line spirit of cooperation. 

After the singing of the hymn "Lord, Speak to Me", the 
Rev. W. R. Noe closed our meeting with prayer. 

MRS. MAMIE CARR BOWDEN, 
S'ecretary for Meeting. 



SOI 



iE INTERESTING COMPARISONS IN CHURCH 
STATISTICS. 



Contributions totalling $41,746,055 by the 1,193,000 com- 
municants of the Episcopal Church in the United ttates, tor 
all Church purposes, were recorded in 1925 for the preced- 
ing year, according to the Living Church Annual for 1926 
which has just been issued. This was an increase of $2,- 
502,927 over 1923, and continues the average high rate 
of increased contributions for all purposes which has been 
maintained since the inauguration in 1919 of a Nation- 
wide Campaign to develop the giving of the Church. 

in 1919 the total gifts to the Church for all purposes was 
$24,392,091. In 1920 under the impetus of the Campaign 
there was a sharp increase aggregating $lu,00u,u0u, ine 
exact figure being $34,873,221; in 1921 the total givings 
went to $35,748,625; in 1922 the total was $36,752,o2u, and 
in 1923 the total took another leap forward to $39,243,127. 
With the figures now reported, which are tne last avail- 
able, the annual givings of the Church membership have 
been increased in five years by approximately seventeen 
and one-half millions, which Church leaders regard as one 
of the most remarkable records ever established in Church 
annals. 

Despite this highly favorable showing the Treasurer of 
the National Council reported at the recent Episcopal Gen- 
eral Convention in New Orleans a deficit of $1,400,000 for 
the triennium ending December 31, 1925. The announce- 
ment of this deficit at the Convention, was met by a spon- 
taneous movement on the part of the delegates which re- 
sulted in pledges of sums from the various dioceses suffi- 
cient to wipe out the total of $1,400,000; and it is now 
announced that of the amount thus pledged on October 
last, cash, pledges and guarantees totalling $671,081 have 
already been received and it is believed that the balance 
will have been paid over and the Church freed of debt 
within a year. At the same time, the annual canvass ol 
the Church, which is now nearing an end, indicates sucn 
an increase in payments on the General Church budget as 
to insure against the accumulation of any deficit in the 
future. 

In addition to the increased membership of 27,078 re- 
ported there were 65,064 confirmations during the year, 
or 1030 more than the preceding year, and 72,055 baptisms, 
though with the 54,879 infants included in this total there 
was a decrease of 250 in this class from the total for 1925. 
There was also a shrinkage of 838 marriages in 1925 as 
compared with 1924, and there were also 690 less deaths. 

The Church in 1926 will have on its roster 6,140 clergy- 
men, an increase of 17 for the year, 498,814 Sunday school 
children and 50,790 Sunday school teachers. There was an 
increase of 43 candidates for Holy Orders during the year, 
but a decrease of 146 lay readers, and in all parts of the 
world the Church now maintains 8,397 parishes or mis- 
sions, an increase of 91 over last year. The Annual re- 
ports a continued shortage of clergy. 



LYNCHING ON THE DECREASE. 



According to figures recently compiled, there were only 
sixteen lynchings in the United S'tates in 1925. This com- 
pares favorably with thirty-three in 1923 and fifty-seven for 
1922. As usual. North Carolina had the best record in 
this respect of any of the southern states. There was no 
lynching in the state in 1925. All of the persons lynched 
in 1925 were Negroes. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Ubc /nbission Ueialb. 



ORGAN OF THE, DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly at 

PLYMOUTH. NORTH CAROLINA. 



Subscription One Dollar A Year 

EDITORIAL STAFF: 

Editor : " 

REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR. 
Contributing Editors: 
RT. RE;V. THOMASi 0. DARST, D.D. 
REV. R. B. DRANE, D.D. 
REV. JAMES E. W. COOK, 
MRS. JAMES G. STATON. 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 



NOTICE OF ENTRY. 
Acceptance for mailing at special rate uf postage, pio- 
vided for in Section llUo,Act of October 3, 1917, autuor- 
ized November 3Uth, 1918. 

Subscribers changing their addresses, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Manager, giving 
when necessary, both the old and new addresses. 

Subscribers wishing to discontinue tueir subicripiions 
should so notify the Manager, as an absence of such noiili- 
cation is considered a continuance of the subscription. 

AH articles tor publication should reach the Business 
Manager by the 25th of the month. New subscriptions, 
renewals, requests for change of address and copy for ad- 
vertisements should be sent to 

REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR., 

Plymouth, N. C. 

THE YEARS OBJECTIVE. 

As we consider the status of the Church in East Carolina 
at the present time it is not difficult to see the direction 
which our main effort should take in the year 1926. The 
Bishop has indicated that during the past year in his plea 
for the "Bishop's Crusade". In East Carolina the call 
has been sounded by the commission on evangelism, creat- 
ed at the 1925 diocesan convention. It is that the clergy 
stress the evangelistic note in their preaching, and that 
all of the churches pray and work for the gathering in of 
souls. We have not seen the diocesan statistics for the 
year 1925, but we have heard unofficially that the number 
of persons confirmed fluring the past year was rather 
smaller than usual. That does not mean that the churches 
have been inactive. Indeed, an investigation will dis- 
close the fact that they have been very active. But it 
does serve to call attention to the fact that we need more 
activity in the direction of evangelism. To use a militarj- 
expression, we have consolidated our position to good ad- 
vantage, and the time has come for an aggressive advance. 
The signs are that we are to have an effective leadership, 
and a clear and unmistakable call to carry out the Great 
Commission. If we are found responsive to the call v^e 
may well expect to remove the reproach of ''merely holding 
our own." But the incentive is to something greater than 
the removal of a reproach, — it is an entire consecration 
to the task of bringing men to Christ and His Church thar 
they may be saved from their sins and have the bread of 
like broken for them. T. P., Jr. 



ihe diocese have made and are in process of making val- 
uable additions to their plants. Churches like bt. James', 
vvilmingtou; Chiist Churcn, New Bern; St. Joans Fayette- 
MUe, ana ti. Stephen's, Goldsboro, have splendid equip- 
ment for the training of the young. Christ Church, Eliza- 
beth City, will soon have a splendia plant, as will St. Paul's, 
Ldeuton, as both nave parish nouses nearing completion, 
ot. Peter's, Washington; &t. Pauls, Greenville; St. Mary's, 
Kinston, and other churches are already comimtiea to iiKe 
undertaKiugs. It is a commonplace that East Carolina has 
developed the idea of stewardship to the point where it 
maintains a level of giving hitnerio undreamed oi. During 
tiie past five or six years we have laid great emphasis upon 
tire support of the Cnurch's Program, and with considerauie 
success. We have had a settled ministry, especially so 
among the missionary clergy, to whose missionary enthu- 
siasm there has been added the comfort of a living salary, 
'incse accomplishments furnish us a certain vantage point 
tnat siiould enable us to take this further step. Concentra- 
tion should be tollowed by diffusion. Whatever reserves 
of power we have stored up should be used, not only in 
maiiing our own position stronger but in bringing others 
to the saving knowledge of God and within the sphere of 
the Church's influence. The efforts which we have rightly 
made in adding to our own usefulness and developing our 
resources should culminate in a loving zeal and passion 
for the souls of others less fortunate and in desperate need 
of what v/e have to give. T. P., Jr. 



THE KIND OF LETTER THAT PLEASES THE 
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. 



Fayetteville, N. C, December 12, 1925. 
My dear Mr. Noe: You will pardon delay in replying to 
yours of the 7th but I left the city immediately after the 
meeting and this is the first opportunity 1 have had to 
v/rite. 

I was instructed to advise you that in the opinion of the 
Vestry we will take care of our apportionment for lt'25 bv 
the end of the year. 

I was also instructed to advise you that even though 
our pledges for 1926 do not amount to quite as much as 
the apportionment, we accept it and will do our best lo 
take care of it during the year. Y''oui's s^incerely, 

C. C CHADBOURN, 
Clerk to the Vestry. St John's Parisi). 



SUBSCRIPTIONS PAID IN DECEMBER. 



Those paying one dollar: Curtis Perkins, E. B. Marston, 
Mrs. Andrew Falkener, H. Fitzhugh Lee, Mrs. G. C. Spool- 
man, Mrs. L. E. S^mith, Miss Elizabeth Harrell, Mrs. M. 

B. Smith, Mrs. D. I. Roberts, Mrs. R. C. Cantwell, Dr. I. M. 
Hardy, Mrs. C. E. Kramer, Mrs. T. T. Hollingsworth, Mrs. 
Cottie Chesson, Mrs. Sarah Bonner, Rev. S. N. Griffith, 
Miss Ella V. Johns, Mrs. C. W. Cahoon, U. N. C. Library, 
Mrs. J. C. Davis, Mrs. O. H. Guion, and Lee R. Smith. 
Total, $22.00. 

Those paying more than one dollar: Miss Catherine 
VVooten, $3.00; Mrs. W. H. Hardcastle, $2.00; Bayard Taylor, 
$2.00; Mrs. J. G. Kenan, $2.00; Blaney Turnage, $2.00; 
Frank Wood, $4.00; Mrs. L. N. Williams, $2.00; Miss Betsy 
Greene, $i3.00; Mrs. S'. N. Bateman, $2.00; W. A. Blount, 
$2.00; George C. Wood, $2.00; L. F. Zeigler, $3.00; Mrs. 

C. O. Robinson, $2.00; Mrs. T. S. Norfleet, $3.00; W. H. 
Weatherly, Jr., $3.00; Mrs. J. A. H. Tankard, $3.00; Mrs. 
E. A. Carter, $2.00; Mrs. F. G. Buhman, $3.00. Total, $45.00. 

Total for month, $67.00. 



WE HAVE LAID THE FOUNDATiON. 

In many ways we have laid the foundation for the evan- 
gelistic appeal that should be made. Many churches in 



The Rev. Richard B-. Doherty, of New York City, sup- 
plied at Christ Church, New Bern, during the months of 
December and January, pending the arrival of the nev^ 
Rector, the Rev. Guy H. Madara. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



BISHOP DARST HEADS NATIONAL COMMISSION. 



Diocesan News. 



The Rt. Rev. J. G. Murray, Presiding Bishop of the 
Church, has appointed Bishop Darst chairman of the Na- 
tional Commission on Evangelism. It is a great honor, car- 
rying with it great responsibilities. 

This action on the part of Bishop Murray is in response 
to a resolution of the General Convention, calling for the 
appointment of such a commission to arouse the Church to 
a sense of its mission. The appointment of Bishop Darst 
as chairman of the commission was foreshadowed by 'the 
enthusiastic reception which his appeal for a Bishop's Cru- 
sade received at a meeting of the bishops early in 1925, 
and by the leadership which he manifested at the recent 
meeting of the General Convention. 

Anticipating such action, the clergy of the Diocese in 
/both Convocations Ihave discussed the iirobable consei- 
quences. It will mean that Bishop Darst will have to give 
much of his time to the organization and direction of a 
national evangelistic campaign. It will call for frequent 
and prolonged absences from the Diocese for a period of 
time. But the clergy were unanimous in their opinion 
that the great contribution which the Bishop can make 
to the work of the whole Church should lead East Caro- 
lina to give its blessing and consent to the undertaking. 

The initial meeting of Commission is to be held in New 
York on February 23rd. The personnel of the Comtnission 
is of the highest excellence. It includes: Bishop Darst, 
Irving P. Johnson, James E. Freeman, and G. A. Oldham; 
Rev. Messrs. Floyd Tompkins, Philadelphia; A. J. Gam- 
mack, Fitchburg, Mass.; J. S. Bunting, St. Louis; George E. 
McDonald, Fresno, Cal.; Messrs. Courtenay Barber, Chi- 
cago; Willard Warner, East Lake, Tenn. ; John Stewart 
Bryan, Richmond, Va.; and Samuel Thorne, New York. 



Personal Items. 



His numerous friends in the Diocese will be glad to learn 
that Mr. Frank Wood, of Edenton, is recovering from a very 
serious illness which he suffered in December. Mr. Wood, 
a very active layman of St. Paul's, Edenton, is also a mem- 
ber of the S'tanding Committee, a delegate to the General 
Convention, and otherwise active in the Diocese. 



The Rev. H. D. Cone, Priest in charge of St. Paul's, Clin- 
ton, spent the Christmas holidays with relatives in the 
North. 



The Rev. T'. F. Opie, a former clergyman of East Caro- 
lina, was recently elected editor of the Carolina Church- 
man, of the diocese of North Carolina. Mr. Opie, an old 
newspaper man, is a prolific writer and will bring a good 
equipment to his new duties. 



The Ven. F. B. Drane, who is in the United States on a 
speaking tour for the mission work in Alaska, spent the 
Curistnias holidays in Edenton vviLh his family. The Mis- 
sion Heiald regrets to heir of a brief illness that prevented 
him fiom keeping some eTii,;agem.'n > 



The Rev. Guy H. Madara, of Mountain Lakes, New Jersey 
has accepted a call to Christ Church, New Bern, and will 
assume charge of that important parish on February inst. 
Mr. Madara has had wide experience, both in missionary 
and parochial work. He spent several years in Alxska, 
doing effective work in several fields. Since 1918 -le had 
charge of two important parishes in the diocese of Newark. 
He is a graduate of the Philadelphia Divinity School. Christ 
Church, which has been without a rector for some months, 
is to be congratulated on securing the services of Mr. 
Madara. He will receive a cordial welcome in East Caro- 
lina. 



WHAT THE CHURCH IS DOING IN DIOCESE OF EAST 
CAROLINA. 



A meeting of the Executive Council of the diocese of 
East Carolina has been called by Bishop Darst, to meet 
in St. James' parish house on Monday evening, January 
25th, at nine o'clock. The Executive Council will consider 
a number of matters which it will recommend to the Con- 
vention for consideration. 



Bishop Darst has placed the Rev. Howard G. England, of 
Mont Alto, Pa., diocese of Harrisburg, temporarily in charge 
of the Lumberton field. He will live at Lumberton, and will 
serve the churches at Lumberton, Hope Mills, Red g'prings 
and Maxton. 



In a letter sent to the women of the Diocese on January 
first, Mrs. James G. S'taton, diocesan president of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary, urged them to observe the feast of the 
Epiphany as a day of prayer for the work of the Church. 
She called attention to the fact that it was the anniversary 
of Bishop Darst's consecration, and gave that as a special 
reason for thanksgiving and intercession. In a number 
of churches there was a special corporate communion tor 
the women. 



On Monday evening, January 25th, the day preceding the 
Annual Convention, there is to be a dinner for the clergy of 
the Diocese, the members of the Executive Council, the as- 
sociate members of the department of Missions and Church' 
Extension, and the officers of the Woman's Auxiliary, in 
the great hall of St. James' parish house, Wilmington. At 
this meeting it is expected that much enthusiasm for the 
cause of the Church will be generated, later finding Us 
way to the fioor of the convention. 



The women are concerning themselves with whether 
their parish is meeting its obligations to the work of the 
Diocese and General Church. Mrs. Staton sent out a letter 
recently, calling the attention of each branch of the Auxil- 
iary to the status of its parish, and urging them to use 
their influence in having apportionments paid. 



Mrs. C. W. Melick, of Elizabeth City, chairman of the 
nominating committee, recently sent a letter to the women 
of the Diocese, asking them to suggest nominees for the 
various elective offices in the diocesan organization of the 
Woman's Auxiliary and Parochial Societies. At the Con- 
vention this month all officers, except that of president, will 
be elected for a three-year period. The president is nomi- 
nated by the Bishop. 



One of the most attractive parochial papers that has come 
to the desk of the Mission Herald is one published in the 
interest of the Colored Missions in Goldsboro, Kinston and 
Ayden. The Rector, the Rev. James E. Holder, is editor 
of the paper, the Parochial Bulletin. The Christmas num- 
ber was of special excellence and interest. 



The last-minute efforts on the part of the Executive Sec- 
retary and the diocesan treasurer to secure a payment of 
the parochial apportionments before January first, was 
supplemented by a telegram sent to the clergy by Bishop 
Darst. In this telegram dated December 26th, Bishop Darst 
called attention to the fact that $14,000 was still due on 
the 1925 apportionment, and urged the clergy to see that 
the Diocese did not begin the New Year with a heavy 
deficit. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



REPORT TO WOMAN'S AUXILIARY OF ST. PAUL'S) 
PARISH, EDENTON, 



IMPRESBiIONS OF GEiNERAL CONVENTION, 1925. 



(MRS. WM. A. GRAHAM.) 

It is a responsibility I feel resting upon me that makes 
me rise to talk to you today. The responsibility one car- 
ries who has gone in your stead, but as a respresentative 
of many to a great gathering of broad-minded, big-hearted 
men and women drawn together in a happy fellowship 
through the love of Christ. 

I cannot come back from such a momentous convention 
as the Forty-eighth Triennial and fail in my duty to tell 
you of some of the events of the Convention. I might 
stress the grandeur of the opening service when through 
an aisle of moss-draped live-oaks whose wide spreading 
branches arched over-head to form a beautiful out-door 
cathedral nave a solemn procession of richly vested bishops 
and choirs signaled the opening of the Convention in 
Audubon Park. I might tell of the tremendous mass meet- 
ings when Bishops from the Orient, from Africa, or the 
islands of the sea told of adventures experienced first-hand 
by soldiers in the army of God. But among the whirl of 
events so far as public gatherings go the one that reached 
the highest pinnacle was the ingathering of the United 
Thank Offering when by far the largest missionary fund 
ever given was laid on the altar of Trinity Church. But 
money was not all that was given. One felt and knew 
earnest prayers were being offered to God from those hun- 
dreds assembled within and without the Church, and that 
many were re-dedicating themselves to Christian service. 
We were gathered there to represent the women of the 
Church; to make an offering which was an acknowledg- 
ment of the debt of service which we owe to God and to 
our neighbor. The gift which we laid upon the altar was 
our thank offering for God's gifts to us of redemption, 
of life and all that makes life worth living. 

In the bright sunshine of that early mornmg flneen iian- 
dred women received the Holy Communion from the hands 
of eight bishops of the Church, and many felt the presence 
of the Holy Spirit to be with those who prayed there. 
Kneeling for nearly two hours the only sound to be heard 
were the foot-steps of those passing up the aisle to par- 
take of the sacred feast. The tread of those Hundreds 
passing by were all going to Christ with thanks, faith 
and hope in their hearts. So we can thank God and take 
courage. "The Great Day of the Woman of the Church" 
the 8th of October has been called and truly so beginning 
with the United Thank Offering that morning the crowd 
gathered again that night — six thousand strong — under 
hundreds of electric lights in Audubon Park for a great 
mass meeting in which the amount of the United Thank 
Offering would be announced. On the platform were group- 
ed thirty missionaries who were introduced by Dr. John 
Wood, Secretary Department of Missions in graceful man- 
ner and tributes paid to the work of each. The chief 
addresses were "The Challenge of Africa," by Bishop Overs, 
and Bishop Brent's splendid answer of the question, 
"Can American Christianity Meet the Challenge?" As 
our national Treasurer, Mr. Franklin, came forward to 
make known the amount of the offering the women waited 
spell-bound until the figures slipped on a long white plac- 
ard showed the grand total to be $904,514.77. The whole 
congregation voluntarily rose to their feet and sang the 
Doxology to express their joy. 

When the gavel fell for the first business meeting of the 
Auxiliary the floor of the auditorium was filled to capacity 
with diocesan delegates. Of the one hundred anti eight 
branches only three were unrepresented at first meeting, 
and sixty-four branches had full representation of five 
members. Four hundred and ten delegates were present 
at the roll-call. The meeting was opened by Miss Grace 
Lindley who introduced Mrs. James McBride, President 



of the Louisiana branch and announced her as presiding 
officer who gave the address of welcome. Mrs. Kingman 
Robins, of West New York ga«ve the report of the Execu- 
tive Board. In studying the problems of the Board Mrs. 
Robins said she had come to know the length, breadth, 
depth and heighth of the work of the Auxiliary. The 
"Triennial report of the Woman's Auxiliary to the National 
Council 1922-'25" by Miss Lindley was the high point of 
this session. In her trip around the world since her last 
Triennial she has visited all but eleven of the one hun- 
dred and seventy-six missionaries in the foreign field and 
also eighty women not listed who are wives of mission- 
aries. She stated that evangelistic missionaries are most 
needed in the field, then doctors, then teachers. A report 
of special interest was that of the "Auxiliary Special" 
made by Miss Winston of Kentucky. At the last Triennial 
held in Portland in 1922, a resolution was adopted that the 
Auxiliary raise in the next three years, the sum of S'eventy 
Five Thousand ($75,000) Dollars for erecting two houses, 
one for white women — returned missionaries in New York, 
and the other for training colored leaders in Raleigh, N. C. 
Miss Winston reported amount raised is $101,334.00. In 
a later report given by Mrs. Pancoast, of Pennsylvania, on 
furnishing the Raleigh house we were told that Mr. Satter- 
field, the architect and builder, of Raleigh, gave one per 
cent of his fee to this project. He is a Methodist who be- 
lieves in tithing. This house provides for 15 students. 
At a subsequent session Mrs. Pancoast the originator of 
the gold and silver offering gave report of same, saying 
fifteen (15) Dioceses have already had gold and silver 
offerings amounting to $75,000. Other dioceses intend tak- 
ings offerings this fall for St. Margaret's school, and to 
complete chapel there $125,000 will be needed. 

The first conference was led by Mrs. Kingman Robins, 
October 9th, on "I he Message" of the Executive Board 
to the National Council, and the spirit of "The Message" 
seemed to enter deep into the minds of the women for often 
thereafter it was referred to in the various discussions. This 
is the message that was sent by our former executive board 
of the Auxiliary to the National Council: 

"We are deeply concerned over the financial situation 
which continues to face the National Council. 

"We are even more alarmed by the probable cause of the 
situation than we are by the possible effect upon the Pro- 
gram of the Church. Believing that the apathy of many 
Church members is due to failure to use the power of 
Christ to meet the needs of the world today, and, conscious 
of our own luke-warmness, we have dedicated ourselves 
anew to our Saviour, and will strive to give proof in our 
own lives of our conviction that He is the only way of life. 

"Further, we offer, with your approval, to try to awaken 
the women of the Church to such a conception of Christ, 
that we may all become more effective instruments of His 
power in the accomplishment of His purpose for the world. 

"Finally, we declare ourselves willing and ready to co- 
operate in any plans which the National Council may set 
before the Church to meet the immediate emergency." 

Mrs. Robins stressed the idea wherein we are individually 
responsible, and our lack of love for others. This confer- 
ence brought out expressions from many others. Miss Stur- 
gis, of Massachusetts, asked: "What are the things that 
are hindering the Church. 1st, lack of consecration, not 
lack of money. Let your spirtual light so shine that we 
may help the world. We are not surrendering our wills 
to Christ — that first, and all else will follow. Mrs. Mon- 
teagle, of California,sald the message makes us realize the 
apathy in our people, but believed the Holy Spirit was 
guiding the women." Miss Winston, of Kentucky, said: 
"Our grandmothers prayed that doors of opportunity might 
be opened — they have been thrown wide. Lack of use of 
the power of Christ keeps us from accomplishing more." 
The Auxiliary adopted the "Message" in toto, and after se- 
rious deliberations the following resolutions were adopted: 

(1). Tlie payment in full of all general Church quotas. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



11 



(2). The overcoming of luke-warmness by deeper spirit- 
ual understanding and greater consecration tlirough pray- 
er and the sacraments. 

(3). United parish effort. 

(4). The strengthening of our rural and foreign-born 
work. 

(5). Closer relationship with the missionaries in the 
field. 

(6). The carrying out of a constructive program of edu- 
cation for peace. 

Almost two days of the business sessions were consumed 
in the decision to abandon a national "£"pecia]" outside the 
main program of the whole Church and the assuming of a 
corporate gift in advance work for the next triennial. 
The final vote, fifty-five to thirty-five, carried to raise 
One Hundred Thousand ($100,000) Dollars for advance 
work in the new Program. The objects to which this sum 
shall be given were voted as follows: 

St. Agnes School, Kyoto, Japan $25,000.00 

St. Timothy's Hospital, Cape Mount, Liberia 20,000.00 

School for Girls, Portau Price, Haiti 12,500.00 

Church building, Baguio, Philippine Islands.... 18,000.00 

St. Mark's P'chool, Nenana, Alaska 15,000.00 

Church building, Livramento, Brazil 8,000.00 

An incident of peculiar interest was the introduction of 
the Presiding Bishop-elect, the Rt. Rev. John G. Murray, 
to the Auxiliary. He was escorted to the platform by Mrs. 
Samuel Thorne, President of the New York branch. He 
made a short address to the women in which he emphasized 
his faith in the spiritual life of the Auxiliary, and termed 
the United Thank Offering "the greatest expression of de- 
votion and consecration that the Church has had in its 
thirteenth triennial." "In your presence," be said, "I feel 
I stand not with a lieutenani to the Board, but with a 
brigadier-general in the forces of the Lord." 

Closing our Convention on the same spiritual note with 
which it was opened and with which it proceeded through- 
out its sessions the women of the Auxiliary knelt together 
for a final service at St. Geo'-ge's Church and re-dedicated 
their lives to Christ. Our Bishop of East Carolina was 
chosen to make the address of the hour which was In 
keeping with their spirit, a plea that the women make 
their lives channels not has ns for God's riches. 

"We have been basins, not channels" BiFhop Darst; de- 
clared. "We have said to Him, 'I need this, I need that,' 
and in His goodness He has grant?d w^^at we asked, 
poured into the basins of our lives His riches and wc have 
held them to ourselves, not letting them flow out to others, 
as we should." 



NEWS OF THE PLYMOUTH AND ROPER CHURCHES. 



"WHITE CHRISTMAS" TREE AT GRACE CHURCH. 

A feature of the Christmas season at Grace Church, 
Plymouth, was a service for the young people of the 
Church on Christmas evening. Each child and grown 
person coming to the service brought a Christmas gift, 
wrapped in white paper, to be placed at the foot of a large 
Christmas tree. About 100 presents were brought, and 
were sent to the people of Galilee Chapel, Lake Phelps, 
to be distributed by the Rev. C. E. Williams. 

The poor and the sick in the Roper community were 
remembered by the people of St. Luke's. A large basket 
was filled with good things on the Sunday before Christ- 
mas, and distributed as a Christmas present. 

The women of Grace Church started the new year with 
a large and enthusiastic meeting, at which they made plans 
for making money for the rectory fund between now and 
the beginning of Lent. Mrs. S'. A. Ward was recently elect- 
ed President of the Woman's Auxiliary. The Parochial 
Guild eletion has not been held at this writing. 

On Sunday, January 3rd, the Rev. Theodore Partrick, Jr., 



celebrated the fifth anniversary of his ministry at Grace 
Church. An unusually large number were present for the 
morning service, and there was a corporate communion 
of those who have been presented for confirmation by Mr. 
Partrick in these five j^ears. 

St. Luke's, Roper, has recently suffered a severe loss 
by the removal to Wilson, N. C, of the family of Mr. 
J. H. Gaylord. The family has been identified with the 
parish for many years, and will be greatly missed. 



AS IT SHOULD BE PRESENTED. 

APPRECIATIVE ACCOUNT OP DR. CLARK'S' MISSION 
AT' BELHAVEN. 



(By the REV. J. N. BYNUM.) 
In Dr. Loaring Clark's recent mission of eight days in 
St. James' Church, Belhaven, we heard the Gospel of our 
Lord and the teaching of His Church presented as we be- 
lieve it ever should be. He gave us in each message flashes 
of insight into God's Word revealing our relaticnship to 
Him in such simple language and illustrations th^n ""c 
could see more clearlj- than we ever imagined His ])l-;n 
for us. He spoke as we like to think the prophets snoke. 
He taught as we read our Lord taught His disciples. Ther-^ 
was not a note of bitterness, or hatred, or impatience to- 
ward anything in any message save those sins that sei^ara'e 
us from our Father. God's desire for the happine'=s a^ul 
salvation of every soul was presented in a spirit of l~ve 
that shone so bright that the preacher was lost behind 
his message. He was sympathetic, considerate and clear 
in his answers to questions about the Bible and the Chur"'\ 
And people got the conception of the Church ?s the com- 
missioned Institution for the dispensing of His truth to 
all men in all its fullness, richness, beauty, simplicity, jinrt 
without prejudice and partiality: the one Church with 
one faith, one Lord, one baptism. Friends and foes of the 
Episcopal Church have been heard to speak favorably nf 
it since hearing Dr. Clark. He Tiresented Church and Bible 
as nearly like our Lord would have them presented as 
we can imagine. This is as it should be presented every- 
where, and the Episcopal Church is stronger in this com- 
munity for having had Dr. Clark. 



MR. NOE WRITES A POEM. 



(From the News and Observer) 
GO ON BROTHER. 
Health all gone and wealth all gone, 
E'ut what is that to a fighter? 
Turn your guns all loose, put your war paint on. 
And screw on your courage tighter. 

Wealth all gone and health all gone 

But we're betting on you still; 

Shoot the engine juice, give a whoop, drive on 

And your wagon will climb the hill. 

Health all gone and wealth all gone. 

But a man isn't down till he's dead; 

Face the waves mile high, clamp the hatches on. 

And shout, "Full speed ahead." 

Stand at the bat, do your level best. 

Until the last great game and inning. 

Get a grip on the stick, knock the ball out west 

And come in home for the winning. 

Oh, the grandstand cheers and the big bands play. 
When you've fought to the finish, Pard; 
And all of us will greet you with a hip hurrah ! ! ! 
If you buck up and buck up hard. 

—A. C. D. Noe. 
Duke, N. C. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



WHAT ARE WE DOING FOR OUR YOUNG PEOPLE? 



(By MRS. J. L. SHACKLEiFORD.) 

Editor's Note: This paper, prepared and read at a recent 
meeting of the Pitt County District, is being published by 
request of the clergy present at the meeting. 

If I understand my task in writing this paper, it is to 
further and exploit the interest, which the Bishop and cer- 
tain of our leading clergymen in the Diocese have been re- 
vealing during the past eighteen months in the lives of our 
young people. This interest has matured to the point, 
where we now have a part time worker in the Diocese 
for work among the young people. We, as women of the 
Diocese, have pledged already our financial support to the 
service of this Secretary. The young people, for their part, 
have obligated themselves to five hundred dollars for the 
maintenance of this Secretary. But simply the pledging 
of money, and the Bishop's appointment, will only go a very 
short distance in the task of organizing our young people 
and fitting them for the years ahead of them. 

Therefore, I appeal to you to keep in mind throughout 
the reading of this paper that I am simply making an effort 
to make clear what our attitude should be towards the 
young people, now that they have an organized system. I 
greatly fear that as a church (referring to the adults), 
we have been seriously remiss during the past. It has been 
our custom to seek for them the Sacraments of Baptism 
and Confirmation and then permit them to drift. Be it said 
to our shame, that too many of our young people, craving 
for an answer to certain elements within themselves, have 
gone to other religious bodies for this answer, and we have 
to acknowledge that there are very few of the teen age 
royally supporting the church. The blame is not entirely 
theirs. We have erred in following a let-alone policy. How- 
ever this is not because we do not love them. I do not 
believe that we have less affection for our young people, 
we have somehow hoped that they might find their way 
unaided into the larger activities of the church. All 
honor to those who do, for they are like the few brilliant 
men and women, who have been able to acquire an e;m- 
cational standard without the aid of school or colleg.^ Wbn: 
the school is to the teen age the Young People's Movement 
is to the teen age. We want in the Diocese, to lead our 
young people into those larger fields of usefulness and iiai)- 
piness, and it can only be done through the four ways Ahich 
I wish to point out to you today. 

I would first emphasize the importance of the Christian 
home as a basic social unit of society, and the great re- 
sponsibility of parents in shaping the whole future life of 
their children. We expect the grain of wheat to grow into 
a strong vigorous stalk, and who dares to prophesy that it 
will not yield a hundred fold? But it must be cultivated 
and given a good start. Young people have a right to ex- 
pect us to be living examples of what Christ would have 
his followers be. Are we? Insist that your children join 
the Young People's League, then see that they attend regu- 
larly and are on time. 

Secondly: be interested in your young people's organi- 
zation, and let them know you are interested. Thrice every 
Sunday you hear your Rector announce the date and time 
of the young people's meeting. You listen very attentively, 
but does it ever occur to you that your presence at one of 
these meetings, occasionally would be encouraging to the 
members? Go to the meeting now and then, they love 
to have visitors, and be ready with helpful suggestions 
when they call upon you. They are just the age of .lesus, 
when He went into the temple and was found by His par- 
ents listening to the learned men and asking them ques- 
tions. And they are asking questions of us, their elders 
in the church. How eager we should be to answer these 
questions, and teach and train our young peojile to walk 
in the paths of righteousness for His name's sake. They do 
real thinking and reasoning for themselves. You would be 



surprised at the thoughts expressed so well by some of them 
at the Service League. It broadens their minds and in- 
creases their knowledge, helping them to meet their prob- 
lems and those of the church. They take a keener interest 
in the affairs of the church and are being trained so they 
can take over the reins of leadership some day. 

There are many things that the young people have a 
right to expect of us. One of them is co-operation. Seek 
out the young people of your town who do not attend any 
("hurch or young people's organization, then tell your group 
about them. Minister to their comfort and enjoyment, in- 
vite them to your home occasionally but do not patronize 
them. Give them a supper and develop the finer senses of 
our boys and girls along the line of athletics and good 
fellowship. There are so many social features that you can 
use, but do not over emphasize the social side or the relig- 
ious side either for that matter, as it will quickly kill the 
other. 

And the greatest of these is Prayer. Do you include the 
young people in your prayers? Some of them have dedi- 
cated their whole hearts and lives to His service, but the 
world is giving them a hard fight. Give them your prayers. 
At this time, when many of our institutions of learning are 
through their destructive criticism of the Bible, shattering 
the faith of young men and women rally to the cause '^nd 
help implant the Word of God so deep into their hearts 
that they will know it is indeed a Living Word utterly 
unlike any word of man. See that they read the Bible, 
and pray with them as well as for them. Their faith Is 
often upset before they enter college. An investigation of 
several freshman's classes in differnt colleges revealed that 
80 per cent of those entering college have given up Chris- 
tianity, do not believe in prayer, and do not consider God 
in their life plans. Th6 age of criminality is constantly 
lowering and we must surround our youth with right asso- 
ciations and give them right ideals, if we would insure their 
self control. 

I am not telling you what we in Farmville are doing, I 
am outlining what I feel is the ordinary duty of every wo- 
man in the Auxiliary. What will we do about it? Shall a 
genuine effort be made to give this vital phase of our work 
an adequate and fairer share of our interest and prayers 
and practical application of both, or will we be content to 
see a continuation of a condition which everyone deplores? 
To such an organization as the Young People's League 
and to its members will we not pledge our strength, our 
loyalty, our vision? What is your will Women of the Auxil- 
iary? 



ST. STEPHEN'S, GOLDSBORO. 



At the dinner which celebrated the rector's fifth anni- 
versary in the parish, announcement was made that Mr. 
George C. Royall, Senior Warden of St. Stephen's, would 
provide the long-needed enlargement of the Parish House, 
as a memorial to his mother, who up to the time of her 
death some twenty years ago was one of the most active 
members of the congregation. 

The people of the parish also are greatly pleased at the 
recent announcement that the memory of a beloved mem- 
ber who died recently would be commemorated by the 
placing of windows in the Church. 

The vestry and congregation are happy because one re- 
sult of their united and devoted co-operation has accom- 
lished the extinguishment of all indebtedness, and left 
them with a substantial bank account, which will be de- 
voted to necessary restorations on the Church building. 

Allan B. King, for many years a member of this con- 
gregation, died at Lakeland, Florida, on Jan. 11. Mr. King 
had been in poor health for two or three years, and had 
.gone South ho])ing to find renewed strength. His body was 
brought to Tarboro. where the funeral was held in tli" 
Church, and the interment was at the old family home in 
Falkland. 



THE AliSSlON HERALD. 



13 



Young People's Department. 

Rev. J. M. Taylor, Secretary for the Young People's Work. 
Miss Elizabeth Moore, Editor of Department. 

PROGRAM FOR FOUR-MONTHS PERIOD SENT. 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE AND TRAINING INSTITU- 
TION, CHARLOTTE, .N 0. 



The Rev. J. M. Taylor, secretary for Young Peoples' 
Work in the diocese of East Carolina, has recently mailed 
to all of the parochial branches of the Young Peoples' 
Service League copies of! suggested programs for the 
months of January, February, March and April. If follow- 
ed, the programs should prove of great help. 

APPROVED PROPOSED CONSTITUTION. 

A copy of a proposed constitution for a national organ- 
ization of the young people of the Episcopal Church was re- 
cently received in East Carolina. Tne proposed instrument 
was read and discussed by a number of Y. P. Si. L. organi- 
zations. As an expression of opinion had been asKed, 
votes of approval have been given. 



ACTIVITIES OF ST. JOHN'S SERVICE LEAGUE, 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



One of the various activities in which the Young Peoples' 
Service League has participated recently was a cabaret 
supper given m the parish house. Never before has a simi- 
lar affair been given in the city by any of the Leagues. 
The young people were helped by several ladies of the con- 
gregation in preparation for the supper. The co-operation 
and services of these ladies were greatly appreciated by 
the Service League, in making this event such a unique 
success. Our program was as follows: 

Collegiate Dance — Emily Eve Jewett, Martha Hatchell, 
Margarette Kerr, Mary Davis, Julia Winstead. 
Dance — Catherine Davis. 

French S'oio — "Cuiseau Leger," — by Madam Hatchell. 
Dance — Ruth Huhn. 

Japanese Pantomine — Emily Eve Jewett, Milwee Beall. 
Dance — "Spirit of the woods," — By Martha Hatchell. 
Minstrel — Guy Davis, Fred Drew, Geo. O. Gaylord. 
Ensemble — By All. 

Under the supervision of the former rector. Rev. J. R. 
Mallett, our present league was organized about two years 
ago. Since that time the league has taken an active part 
m every phase of the Service League work. 

For the past year the Young Peoples' Service League 
has been at a great" loss without its league councilor, name- 
ly: the rector. Through the realization of this loss, the 
league has profited much, to the extent that, among its 
members there has developed a better spirit of co-operation, 
loyalty, responsibility, and service to the church and to 
the League cause. With the coming of our new rector, 
Mr. Halleck, this organization hopes to accomplish much 
greater things than those of the past. 



NEWS OF ST, PAUL'S, EDENTON. 



On Sunday, 13th December, Bishop Darst made his annual 
visitation. As always, his ministration was very helpful 
in St. Paul's Church, and, in the afternoon, at the Meege 
Mission, twelve miles from town. He confirmed ten per- 
sons in g't. Paul's. 

The Parish House is now about ready for its slate roof; 
it shows up well and is in keeping with the appearance of 
the Church. It is placed outside the Church yard, close by. 



DECEMBER AT THE ORPHANAGE. 



Christmas Day, 1925, found the entire Orphanage family 
on wheels, fifty per cent routed on roller skates, the bal- 
ance of them on wagons, scooters or velocipedes. The 
fine new concrete drive and walks greatly enhanced the 
enjoyment of these skates and other rolling stock which 
S'anta Claus brought to the Orphanage in his pack. The 
children have never been more generously remembered 
by their friends everywhere. Each cottage had a beautiful 
tree with electric lights and Christmas decorations and 
each child received a number of presents. The little chapel 
was beautifully decorated and the altar and lectern adorned 
by white hangings made by Miss Nail. The silver chalice 
and paten presented by the Church of the Holy Comforter, 
Charlotte, were used in the Christmas celebration. The 
Singing by the children's choir of the old familiar Christ- 
mas hymns was never heartier or more joyous. In the 
afternoon a roller skating party was participated in by all 
the owners of skates, new and old, under the direction of 
the recreational supervisor. Some expert skaters are rap- 
idly developing. 

On Wednesday evening, December 23rd, the children of 
the primary department presented a Christmas play undei' 
the direction of Miss Elsie Nail. Miss Nail also supervised 
the making of the costumes, which were works of art. 
The singing of the tiny tots was quite remarkable. The 
characters in the play represented Christmas Tree orna- 
ments and came down from the tree to remind the chil- 
dren of the prominent part they play from year to year 
in dispensing Christmas cheer. A large and enthusiastic 
audience heartily applauded the juvenile performers. Miss 
Nail received many and hearty congratulations on the suc- 
cess of the play which was thoroughly enjoyed by every- 
one. 

On Christmas Eve, through the kindness of the manager 
of the Imperial Theater, the children enjoyed very much 
seeing Douglas Fairbanks in the film, "Don Q". 

Far more thrilling, however, than seeing even such a 
famous movie actor as Douglas Fairbanks on the screen, 
was the seeing in person of the noted screen star, Miss Irene 
Rich, who in company with Mrs. Sam Warner, formerly of 
the Ziegfeld Follies, visited the Orphanage on December 
18th, bringing toys and candy and autographing many 
cards and memory books for the older girls. A great feel- 
ing of friendship sprang up between Miss Rich and the 
children. Miss Rich remarking to one of the party, "Those 
children just got hold of my heart." 

Recen*r(Jy twenty-two of the Orphanage children have 
made the diocesan Roll of Honor by a perfect recitation 
of the Church Catechism. They are hoping that Archdea- 
con Hardin may find it possible to visit the Chapel of St. 
Mary the 'Virgin and present them with certificates in 
person. 

The result of the every member canvass was most grati- 
fying. On a quota of $100.00 the canvass netted a total of 
$135.08. 

T'he grateful appreciation of all of the Orphanage family 
is hereby extended to all the generous hearted friends in 
the three dioceses who made possible such a happy Christ- 
mas, and who have given us such comfortable and happy 
homes in which to live. 



CASH CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED FROM THE DIO- 
CESE OF EAST CAROLINA FROM NOV. 23 TO 
DECEMBER 25, 1925. 

Roper, St. Luke's C. S. S'. L $ 2.00 

Wilmington, Miss Wilhelmina Harlow 8.00 

Fayettevile, Robert Strange 10.00 

Roxobel, Thos. S. Norfleet 5.00 



14 



THE MISSION^ HERALD. 



Elizabethtown, E. A. Robinson 4 

Elizabethtown, Mrs. L. M. Cromartie 1 

Aurora, Church of Redeemer Guild 5 

VVilnungton, Mrs. J. W. Wright 5 

Avoca — Sue Martin and George Capehart 5 

Uover, Miss Maggie Bridgenian 10 

Ohocowinity, Trinity 6 

Aurora, Dr. and Mrs. Kafer 10 

Southport, St. Philip's Church and £'. S 12 

Warsaw, Calvary 2 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 1 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 35 

Wilmington, St. James' 667 

Parmville, Emmanuel 10 

Red Springs, St. S'tephen's 10 

Ayden, St. James' 37 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 10 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 18 

Windsor, S't. Thomas' S. S 5 

Clinton, St. Paul's 20 

Kinston, St. Mary's 125 

Roper, St. Luke's 17 

New Bern, Christ Church 69 

Morehead City, S^t. Andrew's 26 

Farmville, Emmanuel 50 

S'even Springs, Holy Innocents' 13 

Wilmington, St. Paul's , 142 

Beaufort,, St. Paul's 39. 

Aurora, Chapel of the Cross 26. 

Greenville, St. Paul's 76. 

Wilmington, St. John's 171. 

Edenton, Joe Smith 10 . 

Edenton, Captain Carl Tarkenton 10. 

Wilmington, A Friend of S't. James' 25. 

YeatesviUe, St. Matthew's S. S 3. 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 20 . 

Whiteville, Grace 5 . 

Belhaven, St. James' 62 . 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 211 . 

Red S'prings, St. Stephen's 10 . 

Creswell, St. David's 19 . 

Bath, St. Thomas' 2 . 

Edenton, St. John's 4 . 

Washington, St. Peter's 174 . 

Jessama, Zion 10 . 

Bonnerton, S't. John's 4 . 

Tren,ton, Grace 18 . 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 46 . 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 18 . 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 10. 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' 5 . 

Maxton, S't. Matthew's ' 5 . 

Woodville, Grace 60 . 

Griffon, St. John's 28 . 

Windsor, St. Thomas' 35 . 

Winton, S't. John's 14 . 

Edenton, St. Paul's 393 . 

Bath, S't. Thomas' W. A 1. 

Snow Hill, L. V. Morrill 1. 

Middletown, St. George's W. A 15 . 

Oriental, St. Thomas' W. A 2. 

Vanceboro, Mrs. L. E. Smith 1 . 



.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.17 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.95 
.40 
.00 
.47 
.00 
.60 
.07 
.40 
.90 
.00 
.09 
.80 
.00 
.30 
.81 
.69 
.85 
.67 
.40 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
00 
00 
32 
21 
95 
55 
40 
00 
41 
55 
00 
65 
79 
03 
50 
00 
00 
89 
13 
25 
00 
27 
50 
00 
50 
00 
00 



CONTRIBUTIONS! IN KIND, SAME PERIOD. 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church W. A. — 6 boy's suits. 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' W. A.— Outfit for Rosa Duffy. 

Kinston, St. Mary's W. A — Box of clothing. 

Winterville, St. Luke's £'. S. — 1 box and 1 barrell of pro- 
visions. 

Windsor, St. Thomas' W. A. — Box of clothing and ma- 
terial. 

Atkinson, Mrs. John R. Hawes — 5 dresses. 

Creswell, St. David's W. A. — Box of clothing. 



Edenton, Charles P. Wales, Jr. — Overcoat. 

New Bern, Girls' Friendly Society — Outfit for Clara Bell 
Curtis. 

Hope Mills, Christ Church W. A — 3 comforts. 

Hamilton, E't. Martin's W. A — Box of clothing for Maggie 
Bland and Edward Haislip. 

Elizabeth City, Mrs. T. S. Harney's Bible Class — Outfit 
for Hester Lee Smart. 

Fayetteville, St. John's C. S. SI L. — Kimona and books 
for Bernice Stanton. 

Wilmington, St. John's Mission — Box of clothing and 
box of dolls. 

Kinston, St. Mary's W. A.— Box of clothing. 

Clinton, St. Paul's W. A.— Box of clothing. 

Robersonville, Woman's Auxiliary — Box of dolls and 
tombs. I 

YeatesviUe, St. Matthew's S. S.— Box of Christmas pres^ 
ents for children. 

Wilmington Bellwill Cotton Mills — New dress gingham. 

New Bern, J. G. Dunn — Pair shoes. 

Edenton, S't. Mary's Guild— 2 scrap books. 

Ayden, Mrs. J. W. Quinerly— 1 scrap book. 



EMMANUEL CHURCH, FARMVILLE, MADE CAREFUL 
PREPARATION. 



MEN OP CHURCH HEAR INSPIRATIONAL ADDRESSES. 



Emmanuel Parish laid plans, at the suggestion of the 
Rector, during the summer months for fall work. The 
Woman's Auxiliary used Dr. Sturgiss' book "The Church's 
Life" chapter by chapter under the leadership of Mrs. J. 
W. Joyner until Intensive Week. During this week they 
met daily for the study of "The World and I" with Mrs. 
J. L. Shackleford as leader of the discussion. On one ot 
these days Miss Gunn, a returned Missionary of the Bap- 
tist Church in China, addressed them. These meetings 
have all been well attended even though they came at a 
time when the women are planning a bazaar by means of 
which they are hoping to raise sufficient money to start 
the building of a brick parish house next Spring. The men 
of the Parish have not had the time to hold quite so many 
meetings, but they have met for the discussion of "How 
one Parish did it" and a portion of "The World and I." On 
Monday, November the 30th, thirteen men met in the home 
of Mr. G. M. Atwater at 7:30 p. m in round table confer- 
ence with the Rev. B. E. Brown and Mr. S. Nash, both of 
Calvary Church, Tarboro, for a discussion of the Church's 
programme. Mr. Brown emphasized the obligation ot 
the confirmation as a solemn vow and promise made by 
each person present. He held the men's attention most 
wonderfully and left an impression as he told them thai 
each one of us "had an appointment with God which must 
be kept if a man desired to retain his good name and 
credit in the Master's business." Mr. Nash said he was 
seventy-seven years of age and had been enabled to enjoy 
health, good eye-sight and hearing through keeping busy 
in the work of extending the kingdom of Christ in the 
small towns around Tarboro. "If you want to be happy, 
have gray hairs without shame, live a long time, win many 
friends, then try to be an active layman in the Church." 
Such was his advice to the young men present. 

St. Barnabas Mission has held group meetings leading 
up to Intensive Week. The Rector has met with both the 
Auxiliary and the men on several occasions for the study 
of the Church's suggested literature. The auxiliary is 
doing good community service work in assisting the local 
woman's club to pay for a splendid community House in 
the centre of the town. Also, they have lived up to their 
obligation of clothing the orphan at Thompson Orphanage 
this year. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



15 



Convocation of Colored Church Woi kers 



-IN- 



The Diocese of East Carolina. 



THE, REV. E. S. WILLETT, Dean. 
THE REV. J.' B. BROWN, Secretary. 
THE REV. R. I. JOHNSON, Editor. 



THE REV. EDWARD Si. WILLETT, DECEASED. 



Though Mr. Willett had been in declining health for 
many months the news of his death nevertheless came 
with a distinct shock to Churchmen in East Carolina. 
There was always hope of health regained and duties re- 
sumed. But it was not to be so, on December 16th this de- 
voted servant and Priest of the Most High God passed 
through death into life eternal leaving behind a host of 
friends to sorrow at his passing. 

The deceased was a native of Iowa in which state he en- 
tered the Sacred Ministry and had served at imiiortant 
points in the Midwest and South. He was a Spanish Amer- 
ican War Veteran and did War Camp Service at Columbia, 
S. C, during the World War. From his Rectorate at St. 
Mary's, Columbia, Mr. Willett came to St. Mark's, Wilming- 
ton, N. C, where he rendered fine service until called to 
the work of Field Secretary for Colored Work in the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina. During the second half of 1925 
while serving in this capacity his health began to fail 
which occasioned his going to Hot Springs, Arkansas in 
the hope of recovery. There he died on December 16th. 
Interment was at Kansas City, Mo., burial being from 
£'t. Augustines Church that city where the deceased was 
Rector more than 12 years ago. In Highland cemetery 
there is a consecrated plot, the property of St. Augustine's 
Church, bought and consecrated when Mr. Willett was rec- 
tor of that Parish. There he was buried on December 21st. 
After the service in the Church which was Requiem Mass 
celebrated by the Revs. Spatches, Mitchell and Johnson 
with eulogy by. Bishop Partridge. Here too, in Kansas 
City, is the Niles Colored Orphan Home started by Mr. 
Willett years ago which stands as a memorial to his in- 
terest in Christian Social Service which characterized his 
Ministry everywhere. 

It is to be deeply regretted that this splendid Priest had 
to lay down his labors in East Carolina at this time. His 
work was justifying the creation of his office and his 
missionary vision was creating in East Carolina Colored 
Churchmen a desire to see the Church come into its own 
as a great force among our people. While Rector at St. 
Mark's he saw the need of Missionary activity in the Wil- 
mington neighborhood and his earnest efforts brought 
forth the Brooklyn and McCumbers Missions. Others would 
have followed soon as his plans were ripening for an ad- 
vance throughout the Convocation. 

Mr. Willett was a man of deep spirituality and every- 
where he went his preaching emphasized the devotional. 
He was a lover of souls and was at his best in quiet per- 
sonal conferences. He had the instincts of a true Director 
and found joy in this particular aspect of the ministry. As 
a Missioner he was intensely spiritual avoiding all things 
spectacular and calling always for personal loyalty to the 
Church and Her Ways as the ordered purpose of God. We 
spent many hours together talking of various things but 
as these conversations come back to us the things of the 
spirit dominate the whole as having always been upper- 
most. A devoted servant of God and His Church has gone 
from our midst. May we remember him with thanks- 
giving. May light and refreshment be his portion in the 
presence of our Lord. 

During Mr. Willett's last illness the Bishop and Diocese 



took loving thought and care for his comfort and welfare 
and when at last the end came no stone was left unturned 
in assuring the proper disposition of the remains of one 
who had been a faithful Priest of our beloved Diocese. 
For all these things we give thanks and take new courage 
to serve. To Mrs. Willett and the children and friends 
the Convocation sends words of sympathy and commenda- 
tion to Him who alone can comfort the hearts of the be- 
reaved. 

This is as far as we can discover the first time a Colored 
Minister of this Diocese has died in its history. 



DOUBLE DUTY DOLLARS. 

Short cuts and easy money. S'ome one who will do two 
men's work; a dollar which will do the work ot two. It's 
the cry of the day, and men lose sleep trying to work it 
out. Cheer up! It has all been solved. Let the Church 
Building Fund show you how to make your dollar do double 
duty for the Church. You are as much interested in 
the Church as is the Building Fund. The latter ha^ tv>o 
kinds of client, — those who need Loans, and tho^e who 
need Gifts. The dollars that go to *he borrower earn the 
help that makes possible the Gifts. Both clients finish 
their building through your single investment. It is a 
beautiful scheme, full of joy for both clients in the accoLi- 
plishment of their desire, and the man with the doUpr gets 
a double reaction. Try it out. The Church today needs 
a quarter of a million of those dollars for buildings. Let 
your dollars make for happiness by doing double duty. 

T'wenty-one borrowers have this year received over $90,- 
000 in Loans which with returns from other Loans have 
made possible thirty-one gifts of over $23,000. What will 
be done for forty others waiting for Loans now unavail- 
able? 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR 1925. 

As Compared with Those of 1924 
Including the United States and Foreign Missions 





Reported 


Reported 






in 1924 


in 1925 


INCREASE 


Clergy 


6,123 


6,140 


17 


Ordinations — 




Deacons . . . 


161 


1-/7 


16 


Priests .... 


156 


157 


1 


Candidates for 








Orders .... 


411 


454 


43 


Postulants 


479 


484 


5 


Lay Readers.... 


3,886 


3,700 


-146 


Parishes and 








Missions . . . 


8,306 


8,397 


91 


Baptisms — 








Infant 


55,129 


54,879 


-^250 


Adult 


12,148 


12,181 


33 


Not g'pecifled 


3,199 


4,995 


796 


Total 


70,476| 


72,055 


1,579 


Confirmations . . 


64,034 1 


65,064 


1,030 


Communicants . 


1,166,243 1 


1,193,321 


27,078 


Marriages 


30,258| 


29,420 


-838 


Burials 


51,026 1 


50,336 


-690 


Sunday School — 


1 






Teachers . . 


55,912 1 


55,790 


-122 


Scholars 


488,261 1 


498,8141 


10,553 


Contributions . . 


$39,243,127 . 47 1 $41,746,055 . 91 


$2,502,928.44 



"We are .going to be very poor as I am taking less Fiilary 
than here, but the good Lord will not let us want vo-iy 
much I am sure," writes a cheerful missionary about to be 
transferred from one Latin American field where the peo- 
ple are very poor to another where they are still poorer. 



16 



THE MISSION HERATJ5. 



^t>-^ 



OWN A SUMMER HOME at CAROLINA BEACH 

Carolina Beach is on the Main Land. A Beach that you -^v drive your Automobile to the Water's edge, 
A good hard road from Wilmington. A new modern hott ^'ow under construction that will be completed 
for the season of 1926. Lots are sold on reasonable teriii.> and as an investment they are ideal. Informa- 
tion gladly given. Call or write any authorized reijresenta'i'.'e. 

CAROLINA BEACH CORPORATION 

OWNERS AND DEVELOPERS OF 



CAROLINA BEACH 



\N\NSTOH- SALEM- N. C. 

W. W. Walsh, Vice-President; 



Offices at CAROLINA. BEACH, N. C. WILMINGTON. N. C. 

OFFICERS: — 9. C. Ogburn, President; W. F. Schaffner, Vice-President; 

E. P. Yates, Vice-President; E. D. Turner, Secretary-Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS: S. C. Ogburn, S'. C. Clark, A. V. Nash, W. F. Shaffner, E. P. Yates, E. D. Turner,W. W. Walsh 
J. L. BECTON, C. E., Wilmington, N. C. Engineer in charge of development. 
REFERENCES: Any Bank or Mercantile Agency. 






MAN'S WEAKNESS- 



Some preachers would have us believe that Adam never 
lived and hence could not have fallen. The Scriptures 
show that this is true. We have demonstrations of it 
every day. If man lets go of himself, he falls. We see 
him down lower than the bruite. 



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CURTIS PERKINS 
Clothier-Hatter — Furnisher 



GREENVILLE, N. C. 



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GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



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Specialists in apparel for Men, Women and Children. 



t ^-LJ^-^y ^ ■^ ^-.^^ -r - V — -^ -r =?^ •W .-. 'T ^ "•' -■»" -^ "TV -^ — ^ 

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I "THE SHOPPING CENTRE/' J 

u GREENVILLE, N. C. I 



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The Hotel Goldsboro, 

Modern— Fire Proof. GOLDS'BORO, N. C. 

VANSTORY Inc , LB-^SEE 



J. C. VANSTORY J. C. WILLIAMS, 

President Vice 




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Cleaners, Dyers and Pressers. "^ 

Mail orders given prompt and careful \^ 

attention. <4 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 4 



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When in Elizabeth City, N. C. 
CALL ON 



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They will be glad to serve you 
RESOURCES OVER FOUR MILLION DOLLARS 



I. RESOURCES OVER FOUR MILLION DOLLARS /J 



W. A. Bowen Department Store, 



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GREENVILLE, N. C. 



Greenville's Authority on Ladies' Wear 
You will profit by trading with us. 



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J. W. Murchison Company, 

WHOLESALE HARDWARE 

2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 Chestnut Street 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



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3. WILLIAMS, J I C(M 

;e-Pres. & Treas. J L "^ 



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};'' Will welcome your buelness. Four per cent Interest 
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^f 




DIOCESAN CONVENTION 
NUMBER 

News of the Convention. 
The Bishop's Annual Address. 
The Woman's Auxiliary. 
The Treasurer's Final Report 
for 1925. 
News and Comment, 



jfebruar^, 1926 



Published by the Diocese of East Carolina at Plymouth, N. C 




-t " * 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Oamt ///arj/'i^ School^ 

/\ JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Rev. WARREN W. WAY, Rector. 



An Episcopal School for Girls. Four years High School and two 
years College Courses. Accredited. Special courses: Music. Art, 
Expression, Home Economics, Business. 

MODERN EQUIPMENT— 20-AC RE CAMPUS. 

Advent session opens Sept. 15, 1925. For catalogue address: 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager, Raleigh N. C 



^r^= 



O/. ^ aul s %Jc/ioo/^ 



An elementary and preparatory school for boys and girls 
Lovely location on coast of North Carolina; healthful cli- 
mate; comfortable room's; wholesome' food; daily prayer; 
preparation for college; athletics; piano; band and orchestra — 
— a home atmosphere fostered. 
Accommodation for 50 boarders. 

For further information apply to, 

MR. E. F. DUNCAN, Principal. 



VIRGINIA 
EPISCOPAL SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 

Prepares boys at cost for Col- 
lege and University. Modern 
equipment. Healthy location In 
the mountains of Virginia. Cost 
moderate, made possible through 
generosity of founders. For cat- 
alogue apply to 

Rev,l,G.Pei!!l6i,'0.0. i 

Rector J 



70ii ■W.—.^—W— ^V.--^- -W - W -W — "^F^n^ 



Church Furnishings 

Gold. Silvev'and Brass .4 

■Ohtirch&liliancel Furniture 

Write for Cataloirne 
for Episcopal Churches 



W. & E. SCHMIDT CO. 

:!08 Third Street, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 




Two Books You Should Buy Now 






L 



1. Bishop William Temple's "Personal Religion and the Life of 
Fellowship." This is the book recommended to the people of the 
Church for Lenten reading by the Bishop of London. 

2. The Rev. Dr. W. C. Bell's, "Sharing In Creation." This is a 
book that will appeal to laymen who wish to learn how the results 
of modern scholarship contribute to the substance of the Chrisitan 
faith. 

Order now through the Mission Herald. 

Write the REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR., 

Plymouth, N. C. 



C5urr§ '^Umx%%Xn%%,iaa/l materials 

Altars,Pulpits,Lectek l:6,Fonts,Fabrics,Embro!deries. 

Memorial Tablets, St ained Glass Windows 

56 WEST 8TH "5T. NEW YORK. 




1 



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SAFETY FOR SAVINGSl 



,71 



Bank with us by mail. 
.TTTLTEN WOOD, President. 
W. O. ELLIOTT, Vice-President 
D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 



Church Vestments 

Cassocks, Surplices. Stoles 
EMBROIDERIES, CLERICAL 
SUITS, SILKS, CLOTHS, 
FRINGES 



HATS, RABATS, COLLARS 



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HERS ^ 

tOK AND MAGAZINE PRINTING* 
GOLDSBORO. N. C. Iv 

? T -- T - 7 — ^- T y — T— ^~ T ---tA 



The Mission Herald. 



Vol. XL. 



PLYMOUTH N. C, FEBRUARY. 1926. 



No. 2 



EAST CAROLINA MEETS IN EORTY- 
THIRD A/N/1UAL CO/NVENTION 



DECIDES TO BRAVE m nORE WINTER WEATHER 



(By THEODORE 
Encountering bad weather which apparently chilled the 
ardor of many laymen and reduced the number in attend- 
ance, the forty-third annual Convention of the diocese of 
East Carolina met in St. John's Church, Wilmington, on 
January 26th and 27th. While the city of Wilmington and 
its people did everything possible to counteract such in- 
fluence, the snow, sleet and ram which descended over 
East Carolina on the 26th found many people unprepared 
and hesitant about leaving home. 

I he Convention itself, m spite of its difficulty in the 
beginning of mustering a quorum, was both helpful and 
interesting. The Church in East Carolina gave a good ac- 
count of its stewardship. The Bishop, the treasurer and 
the committee chairmen informed the Convention of the 
state of affairs with frankness. There was no disposition 
to -'doctor the record", so as to make it appear that the 
Church was more responsive to the demands of its trust 
than it actually is. In the presentation of tacts, whether 
depressing or hopeful, there was a note of faith in the fu- 
ture and a clear call to greater consecration. 

There was little speech-making, and practically no aim- 
less discussion at this Convention. One could have wished 
for a substitution of some discussion of the vital issues 
of life and religion for some of the committee reports, but 
perhaps a Convention of such short duration and charged 
with so many routine matters is not the place for that. 
iSome of the parishes were notably well represented, as 
for instance, S. John's, Fayetteville; Christ Church, New 
Bern, and St. James, Wilmington, but on the whole the 
number of laymen present was entirely too small. It in- 
dicates a direction in which the Church must work, — that 
of enlisting the interest of a larger number of its laymen 
in her spiritual and temporal affairs. 

THE CONVENTION ORGANIZES. 

At ten o'clock on the morning of the 26th the Conven- 
tion was opened in St. John's Church by Bishop Darst, the 
roll was called and organization was completed. The Rev. 
R. B. Drane, for many years president of the Convention, 
was re-elected. The Rev. W. R. Noe was re-elected Secre- 
tary. The personnel of a number of special and standing- 
committees was announced. At this meeting the Rev. 
Alexander Miller was named as chairman of the committee 
on the State of the Church; Mr. George B. Elliott was re- 
elected chancellor of the Diocese; and the Rev. George W. 
Lay was named as chairman cf the important committee 
on canons. 



PARTRICK, JR.) 

SERVICE OF HOLY COMMUNION AND BISHOP'S' 
ADDRESS. 

I'he central service of the Convention, the celebration of 
the Holy Communion, was held immediately after the 
brief session for organization. The Bishop was the cele- 
brant, assisted by the Rev. Messrs. R. B. Drane, W. R. 
Noe and E. W. H'alleck. The service had its usual solemnity 
because of the large number of vested clergy and the pres- 
ence of so many communicants from all over the Diocese. 
The Bishop made his annual address, which is always heard 
with interest, as he is expected to strike the keynote and 
make certain suggestions and recommendations that will 
receive the attention of the Convention. The address, which 
is printed in full elsewhere in this issue, was heard with 
great interest. 

THE TREASURER MAKES HIS REPORT. 

Upon re-convening on the afternoon of the 26th, the Bishop 
announced the death of Mr. Frank Wood, of Edenton. This 
news was received v/ith real sorrow and regret. 

Mr. Thomas D. Meares, diocesan treasurer, made his 
annual report, showing that East Carolina had met all of 
its obligations, including its full quota to the General 
Church, but that in doing so it had incurred a deficit of 
some $2,000. There was a slight falling off in the pay- 
ments on apportionments over 1924, but the report showed 
that for the most part the higher level of giving maintained 
in the past few years is not in danger of being radically 
lowered. 

REPORTS OF INSTITUTIONS. 

The Convention heard three representatives of institu- 
tions in which it is interested. The Rev. G. F. Rogers, 
Rector of £'t. Peter's, Charlotte, and chairman of the 
Executive Committee of the Thompson Oiphanage, gave 
a detailed account of its affairs. It was a most encouraging 
recital, setting forth the great development laat has been 
made in recent years. As a result of East Carolina's past 
failure to contribute its fair share of the maintenance cost, 
a resolution was passed, guaranteeing $7,000 in ]926. 

Prof. Henry W. Gass, of the faculty of the Lniversity ot 
the S'outh, Sewanee, reported that that institution is in 
good shape financially, and that the student body is larger 
than ever before. The Rev. A. S. Lawrence, Rector of the 
Chapel of the Cross, Chapel Hill, told of the increased 
facility for serving the Church students at the University, 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



and asked the Convention to assume greater financial re- 
sponsibility. 

One important resolution was offered by Mr. George C. 
Royall, at this afternoon session, calling for the organiza- 
tion of men's clubs throughout the Diocese, for the purpose 
of enlisting the co-operation of the laymen in the work of 
the Church. 

DR. PATTON SPEAKS. 

At a service in St. John's on the evening of the 26th, the 
preacher was the Rev. R. W. Patton, D.D., whose earnest- 
ness and eloquence has been heard by East Carolina audi- 
ences before. Dr. Patton spoke of the world-wide oppor- 
tunity of Christianity and the Church, urging his hearers 
to consecrate themselves to the task. He spoke with spec- 
ial reference to the educational work of the Church among 
the Negroes. 

At this service Bishop Darst delivered certificates to 
those Sunday Schools that reached or exceeded their quotas 
for the Lenten Offering of 1925. 'St. Andrew's School, 
Columbia, was awarded the banner for making the best 
record. 

SECOND DAY OF THE CONVENTION. 

The annual corporate Communion of the Woman's Auxil- 
iary and Parochial Societies was celebrated in S't. John's 
on the morning of the 27th, with the Rev. E. T. Jillson as 
celebrant. Mr. Jillson made a most helpful adress to the 
women at this service, and an offering was made for the 
Bishop's Fund. 

The second day of the Convention was largely occupied 
with elections and the receiving of reports. The results 
of the elections are given elsewhere. As a result of the 
re-election of the members of the Executive Council, a res- 
olution was offered, asking the committee on canons to 
draft a change in the canon, providing for rotation in office. 

Two interesting matters disposed of on this day was the 
acceptance of the invitation of Christ Church, Elizabeth 
City, to hold the 1926 Convention thei'e, and the change 
of the date to the first Wednesday in May. 

The report of the Commission on Evangelism, created at 
the 1925 Convention, was made by the chairman, the Rev. 
C. O. Pardo. It recommended a thorough organization of 
the Diocese for promoting the cause of evangelism, carefully 
noting the large part that laymen can play. The report of 
the commission and the cordial reception given it is in 
line v/ith the national movement headed by Bishop Darst. 

A special committee was appointed to study the work 
of the young people, referred to in the address of the 
Bishop. Making its report through the chairman, the 
Rev. F. D. Dean, the committee recommended that the 
Diocese defer the proposed plan to establish a summer 
camp, and accept the invitation of Camp Capers to send 25 
delegates there this summer, for the purpose of training 
leaders. It was further recommended that the Young Peo. 
pie's Conference be held again this year. 

The Rev. J. M. Taylor, secretary for Young Feo 
work, spoke to the Convention about the work done this 
year. 

THE STATE, OF THE CHURCH. 

The Rev. Alexander Miller, chairman of the Committee 
on The State of the Church, presented a report that w 
the result of careful and detailed study. It cited some 
evidences of advance but on the whole was a searching 
statement of the failure of the Church to carry out its 
program of advance. Confirmations, baptisms, and other 
vital statistics showed a slump over 1924 that is the cause 
of real concern. 

The report of the Woman's work, read to the Convention 
by the Rev. E. T. Jillson, was wholly good, showing much 
activity on the part of the women of East Carolina. 



GENEROSITY INVITED. 



The following resolution was passed at the Con- * 

vention: * 

•■Resolved, that the following be printed in each * 

issue of the Mission Herald: * 

"In case anyone has already given his full and * 

liberal share towards the apportionment of his Parish * 

and yet desires to make a further contribution to- * 

wards the diocesan or national program, the Con- * 

vention urges that such a one should send his further * 

contribution, directly to the diocesan or national * 

treasurer respectively marked 'Individual', to be * 

credited in the former case to the Diocese but not to * 

the Parish, and in the latter case to the national * 

program, but not to the Diocese." * 



MiSS BOYER TO CONDUCT INSTITUTE IN FAYETTE- 
VILLE. 



The women of East Carolina will be much interested 
in the announcement that Miss Laura F. Boyer, one of 
the National Leaders of the Church in religious edu. ation, 
is to conduct an Educational Institute in St. John's Chuixh, 
Fayetteville. 

It is hoped that every Parish in the Diocese will send 
one delegate, all delegates being entertained by the wo- 
men of the Parish of Fayetteville. The Institute will begin 
on Monday night. May 3rd, continuing through Tuei!a.'>' 
until Wednesday morning. 

The women of East Carolina will have a wonderful 
opportunity to learni much about the work which the 
Church is doing today, and are fortunate in securing Miss 
Boyer as the teacher of this Institute. The March issue 
of the Mission Herald will contain full information about 
the plans of this event in the Diocese. 

Those who were at New Orleans brought back glowing 
accounts of Miss Boyer as an interesting and instructive 
teacher. 

The women of St. John's, Fayetteville, are looking for- 
ward to having a woman from every parish in East Caro- 
lina there on May 3rd. 



INTERESTING SERVICES FOR YOUNG AND OLD AT 
CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD. 



The Christmas activities began in Good Shepherd Parish 
on Tuesday, December 22nd, with a Christmas tree for the 
Junior and Primary Leagues. The Junior members plan- 
ned a splendid program for the occasion which was given 
by the Primary League. 

On the following day, Wednesday, December 23rd, the 
Good Shepherd Kindergarten children gave a Christmas 
tree to the parents. Bfefore distributing the little gifts 
they had made themselves for mother and father the little 
tots delighted those present with a program of songs ana 
recitations. 

The Christ's Mass or Christ's S'ervice (Holy Communion) 
was celebrated at 10:45 Christmas morning. 

On Holy Innocents night the Church School Festival 
and tree was held in the Parish Hall. The Y. P. S. L. 
assisted by members of both the Junior and Primary 
Leagues presented a beautiful Christmas pageant in which 
the Christmas story was told in song and tableau. 

Over 150 people were present at Good Shepherd Church 
Sunday evening, Jan. 10th, at the annual service of the 
"Feast of Lights." A full account of this beautiful and 
impressive service was given in the Mission Herald last 
year. 



THF. MISSION FERALD. 



THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS 



Brethren of the Clergy and Laity of the Diocese of East 
Carolina: 

"Grace be unto you, and peace from God our Father, anc: 
from the Lord Jesus Christ." 

We welcome you to the forty-third Annual Convention, 
and we pray that the Holy Spirit may direct and guide ns 
in our deliberations as we plan for the extension of the 
Kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. 

During the past year two clergymen of the Diocese en- 
tered into the larger life of Paradise. 

The Rev. Edward Wooten, Senior Priest of the Diocese, 
after a faithful ministry of sixty years, lacking one, and 
in the eighty-ninth year of his age, entered into rest on 
August nineteenth. 

Mr. Wooten, who was born in Pitt county in 1837, en- 
tered Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut, aoout 18-58, 
and left that institution in 1861. and served gallai-.tly ss 
an officer of the Confederacy during the entire war. 

Together with many other young soldiers of the Con- 
federacy, he entered the Theological S'eminary of Virginia 
in 1865, and graduated in 1868, together with the Inie Pishop 
Peterkin, of West Virginia, and the late Bishop William 
J. P.oone, of China. 

Mr. Wooten was ordained to the Priesthood in 1868 by 
Bishop Atkinson, and with the exception of a year in Dela- 
ware, and three years in Tennessee, served his entire 
Ministry in North Carolina. 

He was loyal to the teachings of the ChiuTh. faithful 
in the discharge of his ministry, unfaltering in his alleg- 
ian'^e to his Master. 

Having finished his course in faith, he now rests from his 
labors. 

On December, fifteenth, in the Government HospitPl. 
Little Rock, Arkansas, where he had gone fo- treatment 
several weeks before, the Rev. Edward S'. Willett entered 
into the rest that remains for the people of God. 

This faithful Colored Clergyman came to the Diocese 
from South Carolina in 1920 and served several years as 
Rector of St. Mark's Church, Wilmington, before entering 
upon his duties as Field Secretary of the (Joloreil Work. 

Both in his Rectorship, and in the larger sphere of his 
field work, he was faithful and loyal — to his untiring zi.al, 
we owe the establishment of at least three new Mission 
stations among the Colored people during the past two 
years. 

Broken in health, he struggled on with courage until 
God in H'is tenderness, called him home. 

"For all Thy saints who from their labors rest 
Thy name O Jesus be forever blessed — Allelulia." 

In presenting a survey of the Diocese during the past 
year, I will try to give you some information regardin.g 
certain outstanding departments of our Diocesan life, and 
may I present first — ■ 

THE COLORED WORK. 

We have at the present time one self-supi)orting Parish 
(St. Josejih's, Fayetteville), two Parishes suppoi-ted in part 
by the Diocese and General Church, eleven organized Mis- 
sions, four unorganized missions, and six Parochial schools. 

The work is being carried on by seven Clergymen and 
seven teachers, and while we cannot report great iirogress 
during the past year, we feel that our efforts have not 
been in vain. 

The number of Confirmations in the Colored Churches in 
1925 was discouragingly small, but this was due m oarf 
to the failure of Bishop Delaney, on account of illness, 
to keep a number of his appointments. 

The work of the Field Secretary, the late Rev. Edward 



£'. Willett, was hopeful, encouraging, and efficient up to the 
time when he became too weak and ill to attend to his 
duties; but even under the most favorable circumstances, 
it is a grave question as to whether the results of su.:'h 
field work justify the expense of such an office. 

We are hoping that the Executive Council may be able 
to devise ways and means whereby the work among the 
Colored people of the Diocese may be correlated and uni- 
fied and extended without employing a full time field 
worker. 

The response to the Church's Program on the part of the 
Colored congregations has, in the main, been very gratify- 
ing. 

The- quota laid u])on the Colored Churches and Missions 
: uicunted to twenty-three hundred dollars, and of that 
sum, fifteen hundred dollars was paid during the year. 
Some of the Colored Missions paid practically nothing on 
their ai;porticnments, and those Mssiions are res])onsible 
for the lowering cf the average giving of our faithful Col- 
ored people. 

The Committee on Appropriations will, of course, take 
all of these matters under consideration when making ap- 
luopriations for the coming year. 

We h-ive some very earnest and consecrated leaders num- 
bered among the Colored Clergy of East Carolina, and I 
think I am safe in assuring the Convention that those 
leadei's wilj never be satisfied until they bring every Parish 
and Mission in the Diocese to a higher standard, financially, 
numerically, and spiritually. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK. 

We are happy to report that real progress has been made 
in this important department of the Church's life during 
the past year. Following the organization of the Diocesan 
Young People's Service League at the Young People's Con- 
vention in Fayetteville last June, we appointed the Rev. 
Joseph Mitchell Taylor as part time Field Secretary for 
Young People's Work. Mr. Taylor entered upon his work 
with fine zeal and enthusiasm, and has visited a number 
of Parishes and Missions in the interest of the work among 
young people. 

Seven new S'ervice Leagues were organized during the 
year, and it is confidently expected that there will be a 
league in every Parish and Organized Mission in the near 
future. 

In order to unify the work in the Diocese, and to make 
it more effective and helpful, it seems necessary to arrange 
for a permanent camp and conference ground where our 
young people may come for recreation, inspiration and 
information for two or three weeks each Summer. 

If we are to build a finer fabric of character in East Caro- 
lina, we must look well to our foundations. I trust that 
this most important matter of carrying on and strengthen- 
ing the work among our young jieople may receive your 
serious and careful consideration at this meeting of the 
Convention. 

WOMAN'S WORK. 

It is always a pleasure to report on the organized work 
of the women of the Diocese, for it is so fine and whole- 
some and worth-while. You will hear of that work in 
greater detail when the report of the Diocesan President is 
read to you, but I must take this opportunity of expressing 
my profound appreciation of the loyalty and devotion and 
s.elf-sarrificing service of the women of East Carolina. 

I said a moment ago that I always found it a pleasure 
to speak on this subject, but that pleasure is tinged with 
regret today, due to the fact that our efficient and capable 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



officer and friend, Mrs. James G. Staton, after many years 
of truly remarkable service, has resigned as President of 
the Woman's Auxiliary and Parochial S'ocieties. Mrs. Sta- 
ton was appointed to this office by Bishop Strange in 1912 
and for the past fourteen years has given her time, her 
means, her unstinted devotion, to the work entrusted to 
her hands. We thank God for her beautiful and unselfish 
service during all of those years, and we pray that she may, 
in health and strength, continue to walk in the front rank 
of our advancing Diocesan life for many more happy, use- 
ful years. 

DIOCESAN AND GENERAL. 

The general work of the Diocese has gone forward splen- 
didly during the past year, and I feel that we have many 
reasons for profound thankfulness as we enter upon 
days and months that lie ahead of us. 

The total number of Confirmations for 1925 was smaller 
than for several years, and I find it rather difficult to ac, 
count for that falling off in such a vital matter. I have 
made my usual number of visitations, but in several in- 
stances no classes for Confirmation were presented, and 
in many others, the classes were quite small. I try to con- 
sole myself with the thought that all Dioceses have an "off 
year" now and then, but perhaps we should not be satis- 
fied with that line of reasoning. 

I am inclined to believe that the reason why a larger 
number of people are not coming forward for Confirmation 
is because of a very definite spiritual apathy; a seeming in- 
difference to the claims of Christ and of His Church. 

The time may be ripe, and T believe it is ripe, for a great 
spiritual awakening, a great Evangelistic campaign for 
souls. Because T believe that to be true, I will welcome 
any plan looking to a series of missions to be conducted 
in every Church and Mission in the Diocese during the com- 
ing year. 

The whole Church is beginning to realize the need of 
such an Evangelistic Campaign, and as Chairman of the 
National Commission on Evangelism, I am in a position 
to inform you that plans are already under way looking 
to a great spiritual crusade that may, under God, bring an 
indifferent Church back to jts old winning power, and send 
it out with a passion for the souls of men. 

During the past year, the Diocese maintained its high 
standard by paying its General Church Budget quota in full, 
and I am sure that we will always maintain that standard, 
for it is unthinkable that we should refuse to do our little 
part in carrying out the .great program of God. You must 
realize, however, that all of our Parishes and Missions 
are not living up to the standard of the Diocese, and that 
we will continue to be sadly crippled in our work of Church 
extension in East Carolina, and beyond, unless every Parish 
and Mission bears its share of the glorious burden that the 
dear Christ has placed upon us. 

We may present more or less reasonable excuses for not 
supporting the local Parish at times. We may be hurt 
and offended because we have not been understood or ap- 
preciated, but, beloved, if our religion means anything 
to us, if we believe it is the power of God unto salvation, 
if we believe that people are dying in sin and ignorance, 
waiting for the healing power of Christ, why then, we are 
false to Him, recreant to our trust, unworthy of the name 
we bear, if we do not give of our means to bear the glo- 
rious message to those who sit in the great darkness wait- 
ing for the light to come. 

To my dear Brethren of the Clergy may I address a very 
personel a very loving word. You are fine and loyal, and 
your friendship is inexpressibly precious to me. I know 
your problems, your cares, your anxieties, your moments 
of profound .ioy when you are permitted to bring a stained 
soul into the cleansing presence of Christ, and your hours 
of a.gony when you see one of your dear flock slipping and 
stumbling down the paths of sin. 
Every day of my life, T pray God that He may strengthen 



you and bless you and make you strong and tender in your 
life, and like unto Him in your Ministry, and I am comfort- 
ed and strengthened in the thought that you are praying 
that God may use and bless me in my Ministry. 

I know that it is hard, desperately hard, to walk close 
to Christ todas'. So many voices are calling us away from 
Him; so many forces are striving to break down our alle- 
giance to Him. The heavy fog of present day materialism 
makes it difficult for us to see Him at times, but thank God 
you and I know that He is very close to us all the time, 
all the way. 

God grant that we may walk with Him, and talk with 
Him. and learn of Him the meaning of life, and the power 
of His Ministry. We may be poor, we may be working in 
the drab and commonplace corners of the Vineyard, but 
we are His Ambassadors; we are His voice; we have His 
Commission. 

If we have failed in our Ministry; if we are not happy 
in our work, if we are not thanking Him every day for the 
privilege of sharing in His redemptive work, let us push 
through the crowd and get close to Him again. 'See Him 
with little children and learn how to brin.g the children of 
cur communities to Him. See Him touching the foulness 
of sin and disease and death and learn of Him the power 
to heal. See Him visiting the homes of the lowly, and the 
pplaces of the mighty, and learn of Him the forgotten jov 
of the pastor who finds Christ in the homes of his people. 
See Him as He calls Andrew and Peter and all the rest to 
be His Disciples, and learn that there are still men. lonely 
men, watiing for the personal word, the loving invitation, 
not to the multitude, but to the individual soul. 

Hear Him, as He preaches by the shore of the lake, on 
the plains and on the mountains. Drink in again the sim- 
plicity of it all, the beauty of it all, the power of it all. 

It is ours to use, ours to give just in so far as we are 
willing to use it and to give it to those who look to us 
for guidance and for light. 

And there are so many looking to us today — perplexed 
men and women, anxious, worried, unhappy, disillusioned, 
wandering in strange paths, looking for peace and happi- 
ness, and finding neither. They want to find the way home. 
You and I can show them the way if we know the way — 
If we have gotten close enough to Him to hear Him say 
"I am the Way." We can never show the way unless we 
know the way. We can never lead them till we have learn- 
ed to follow Him. 

In this hour when so much depends unon us; when a 
restless world is depending upon us; when the blessed 
Christ is depending upon us; shall we not pray from our 
hearts the beautiful prayer of Bishop Wescott — 

"Yea, Lord, we will follow Thee, follow Thee, if it he 
Thy will, through the thirty years of obscurity, follow 
Thee through the three years of mixed welcome and re- 
proach, follow Thee through the dark valley, follow Thee 
to Thy throne above, as those who have not attained, and 
cannot attain, but who strain forward with a zeal which 
cannot tire, toward an ideal which cannot disappoint!" 



THE PROGRAM FOR EVANGELISM AS APPROVED BY 
THE DIOCESAN CONVENTION IN WILMINGTON, 
JANUARY 28. 1926. 

Enlisting of all clergymen in the Diocese as Missioners. 

A Preaching Mission in every Parish and Mission. 

A Diocesan or Tnter-Diocesan Conference on Evangelism. 

Issuing of Handbook on Evangelism. 

Enlisting and training of Laymen for definite work in 
Lav Evangelism. 

Evangelism in every Parish and every Parish group 
as a subject for discussion and as an activity. 

Special activity in neglected areas and rural sections. 

A' Diocesan Missioner — whole or part time. 

Extract from the Report of The Commission on Evange- 
lism: "We hope to see the entire program In force in 
from two to five years time." 



IHE MiiSSlON HERALD. 



WOMEN OF DIOCESE HAVE ANNUAL MEETING IN 
WILMINGTON. 



NEW OFFICERS EL.BCTED AND WORK UNDERTAKEN. 



(By MRS. J. N. BYNUM.) 

In spite of the inclement weather on Monday, about fifty 
delegates and visitors were present to answer the roll call 
when the 39th Annual Meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary 
and Parochial Society was called to order in St. John's 
Parish House, Wilmington, on Tuesday. January 26th. 
The President, Mrs. James Grist Staton, presided. 

The Chaplain, the Rev. Edmuna T. Jillson. led in the de- 
votional service. On behalf of the women of St. John's 
Parish. Mrs. C. D. Jacobs welcomed the delegates in a 
most gracious way. Mrs. George Frank Hill, of Elizabeth 
City, responded and extended a cordial invitation on be- 
half of Christ Church. Elizabeth City, for the annual meet- 
ing in 1927. 

The reports of officers occupied the attention of the 
women for a large part of the first day. The absence of 
reports on several phases of the work rather detracted 
from the interest but the general trend was upward in a 
consistent and hopeful way. There were many constructive 
suggestions offered for 1926, — all of which will appear in 
the Annual, — but without exception all our officers urge 
us to read, read, read and inform ourselves about the work 
of our Church. 

The Annual Corporate Communion of the Woman's Auxil- 
iary and Parochial Society took place on Wednesday morn- 
ing in St. John's Church, with the Chaplain, the Rev. Ed- 
mund T. Jillson the celebrant. The offering for the Bishop's 
fund at this service reached the gratifying total of $680.73. 

The report of the Nominating Committee of which Mrs. 
C. W. Melick, of Elizabeth City, was chairman, was as fol- 
lows: 

First Vice-President, Mrs. Richard Williams, Greenville. 

S'econd Vice-President, Mrs. S. P. Adams, Wilmington. 

'Secretary, Mrs. Joseph N. Bynum, Belhaven. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Albert Hugh Worth, Elizabeth City. 

United Thank Offering Treasurer, Mrs. James Grist 
Staton, Williamston. 

Educational Secretary, Convocation of Edenton, Miss May 
Wood Winslow, Hertford. 

Educational Secretary, Convocation of Wilmington, Mrs. 
O. A. Hamilton, Goldsboro. 

Box Secretary, Mrs. L. J. Poisson, Wilmington. 

There were no nominations from the floor and the report 
was accepted. 

The Bishop made his annual address to the women on 
Wednesday. After paying a glowing tribute to the leader- 
ship of our retiring President, Mrs. James Grist Staton, 
he disposed of the financial part of his message. 

Our work for this coming year is as follows: 

Central Expense Fund $ 800 . 00 

Corporate Gift 700. 00 

Y. P. S. L. Field S'ecretary 300 . 00 

Recreational Worker, Thompson Orphanage 300.00 

Woman's Auxiliary. Scholarship, St. Mary's...... 300.00 



$2,400.00 
A feeling of keen regret was expressed on every hand 
that Mrs. Staton feels it necessary to give up the work 
which she has done for so many years in such an efficient 
and inspiring way but the Bishop's appointment of Mrs. 
Henry J. McMillan, of Wilmington, to succeed her as Presi- 
dent of the Woman's Auxiliary and Parochial S'ociety of 
East Carolina met with entire approval and satisfaction. 
Other appointments made at this time were- 
President Girl's Friendly S'ociety, Mrs. George Moulton, 
Jr., New Bern. 

Provincial Vice-President, Daughters of the King, Mrs. J, 
B. Glbble, Wilmington. 



Secretary, Guild of St. Barnabas, Mrs. Thomas C. Darst, 
Wilmington. 

Secretary, Church S'chool Service League, Mrs. William 
von Eberstein, Washington. 

Delegates to Provincial Meeting of the Women's Auxil- 
iary: 

Mrs. Henry J. McMillan, 118 South Fourth St. Wilmington 

Mrs. S. P. Adams, 20 North Fifth S't., Wilmington. 

Mrs. Richard Williams, 402 Green St., Greenville. 

Mrs. James Grist Staton, 301 West Main St., Williamston. 

Alternates: 

Mrs. William N. Tillinghast, Fayetteville. 

Mrs. Albert Hugh Worth, Elizabeth City. 

Mrs. J. N. Bynum, Belhaven. 

Mrs. Swift Miller Boatwright, Wilmington. 

Archdeacon Drane was unable to be present on account 
of his own illness and the death of his father-in-law, Mr. 
Frank Wood. 

During the course of the meeting we were privileged to 
hear Dr. Patton talk on Our Responsibility for the Train- 
ing of the Negro; Rev. Mr. Lawrence on his work with the 
boys at the University; Mrs. Guy Small on "Peace", and 
the Rev. Mr. Pardo on Evangelism. Mrs. S. M. Boatwright, 
Mrs. William N. Tillinghast and Mrs. William A. Graham 
gave brief and interesting reports of their visit to the 
Triennial. Perhaps no message made a stronger appeal 
than did that of Dr. Lula Disosway. To many of us it was 
our first opportunity to hear and see Lula Disosway in 
whose hopes and plans we have all come to have such an 
interest. Her simple straightforward story was listened 
to with deep interest and her appeal for the continued 
affection and prayers of the women of East Carolina as 
she goes out to her chosen work is sure to meet a whole- 
hearted response. 

While Mrs. Woolvin's work is falling on very capable 
shoulders we regret that she must withdraw from active 
participation in it. Her heart is in the United Thank Offer- 
ing and her interest will continue to find effective expres- 
sion although she is no longer our United Thank Offering 
Treasurer. 

The last session of the Annual Meeting closed on Wed- 
nesday night. The people of St. John's parish had shown 
us every courtesy, we had had a fine meeting and we left 
with regret. Every woman present went away pledged 
to do her utmost to carry out the Message in the work 
back home, to "rededicate herself to the service of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, to make the strength of her deeds the 
measure of her faith." 



MRS. EUGENE ROUNTREE-. 



Whereas it has pleased the Father of us all to call to 
the home on high our fellow-member Mrs. Eugene Roun- 
tree and remove her from this life to the mansions of 
the blest, and 

Whereas though we bow in humble submission to this 
expres; on of the will of Almighty God and do not ques- 
tion His divine omniscience, we desire to record our 
deepest sympathy for the family in this bereavement, 
therefore be it 

Resolved, that the Woman's Auxiliary of St. Mary's 
Parish does hereby express its realization of the great 
loss it has experienced by reason of her death and re- 
moval from this scene of her labor, and its sincere partici- 
pation with the family in its grief and sorrow. 

Resolved, that these resolutions be spread upon the min- 
utes of this Auxiliary, that a copy be sent to the family, 
to The Mission Herald, and to The Kinston Free Press. 
MRS. W. F. HARDING, Ch. 
MPS'. W. A. MITCHELL, 
MRS. A. J. ASHFORD, Com. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



XTbe /Ibisslon 1beral6. 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OP EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly at 

PLYMOUTH, NORTH CAROLINA. 



Subscription One Dollar A Year 



EDITORIAL STAFF: 
Editor: 
REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR. 
Contributing Editors: 
RT. REV. IHOMAS' C. DARST, D.D. 
REV. R. B. DRANE, D.D. 
REV. JAMES E. W. COOK, 
MRS. JAMES G. P'TATON. 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 



NOTICE OF ENTRY. 
Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage, pro- 
vided for in Section li03,Act of October 3, 1917, author- 
ized November 30th, 1918. 



Subscribers changing their addresses, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Manager, giving 
when necessary, both the old and new addresses. 

Subscribers wishing to discontinue their subscriptions 
should so notify the Manager, as an absence of such norifl- 
cation is considered a continuance of the subscription. 

All articles for publication should reach the Business 
Manager by the 25th of the month. New subscriptions, 
renewals, requests for change of address and copy for ad- 
vertisements should be sent to 

REV. IHEODORE PARTRICK, JR., 

Plymouth, N. C. 

TO TWO SERVANTS, WELL DONE! 

Two women who have been of conspicuous service to the 
diocese of East Carolina in recent years were relieved of 
their tasks at the annual meeting of the women in Jan- 
uary. Mrs. James G. Staton who for fourteen years has 
been President of the Woman's Auxiliary and Parochial 
Societies, was relieved of this position, at her request. 
Mrs. Staton's untiring work and vigorous leadership has 
resulted in a great advance in the response made by the 
women. Her time and means have at all times been at 
the disposal of her office. One feature of her administra- 
tion has been of particular value, — the way in which she 
has kept the clergy in touch at all times with the under- 
takings of the women. The splendid co-operation that she 
has sought and obtained is a great credit to her ability 
and energy. It is good to know that she will continue 
her diocesan work in another capacity. Another diocesan 
officer that deserves the highest compliment for the work 
that she has done so faithfully and well is Mrs. J. F. Wool- 
vin, who for a number of years has been custodian of the 
United Thank Offering. Mrs. Woolvin has not merely 
acted as treasurer, she has been a real apostle of generous 
and sacrificial giving on the part of the women. The splen- 
did record that the Diocese has made with this Offering 
has been due in large measure to her consecrated energy. 

T. P., Jr. 



THE PASSING OF A FINE LAYMAN. 

With the recent death of Mr. Frank Wood, of Edenton. 
the diocese of East Carolina loses one of its finest laymen. 
Mr. Wood was a consecrated man, generous-minded, and 
genuinely interested in anything that affected the wel- 



fare of the Church. He was not given to much talking, 
but when responsibility was to be assumed or action to 
le taken he was to be counted upon. Much of the credit 
lor the unusually fine showing that St. Paul's, Edenton, 
has made in support of diocesan and general church pro- 
grams in recent years is due to his work as treasurer of 
that Parish. As a member of the Diocesan Convention and 
of the Standing Committee he did faithful and constructive 
work. As a deputy to the General Convention he proved 
to be a wise legislator and supporter of forward-looking 
movements. His steadfast faith, unswerving loyalty and 
generous support of every part of the Church's work will 
be long remembered in East Carolina. T. P., JR. 



AN ENJOYABLE DINNER 



On the evening before the annual Convention a dinner 
was given by Bisnop Uarst to the members of the Executive 
Council, associave memuers of the Department of Missions 
and Church Extension, and all of the clergy of the Diocese, 
in the Great Hall of St. James parish house. Mr. George 
B. Elliott served as toastmaster, and called on a number 
of laymen present for speeches. Mr. George C. Royall 
urged the organization of the laymen for effective Church 
worii, and this suggestion was seconded by Mr. J. Q. Beck- 
with. Mrs. James G. Staton, speaking for the women, 
pledged their greater interest and co-operation. 



Personal items. 



News that the Ven. F. B. Drane has been forced to cancel 
many of his appointments because of illness, will be re- 
ceived With great regret in East Carolina. Archdeacon 
Drane has a severe attack of grippe and bronchitis at 
his wife's home in Edenton. His inability to attend the 
uiocesan Convention brought disappointment to many. 



Mr. Harold J. Lewis, a student of the Theological Sem- 
inary in Virginia, attended the Convention in St. John's, 
Wilmington. Mr. Lewis was in Wilmington to take his 
examinations for the diaconate. 



'Several new faces among the clergy appeared at the 
Convention in Wilmington. Among them were the Rev. 
H'. G. Egland, who is serving the Robeson County field; 
the Rev. E, W. H'alleck, the new Rector of St. John's Wil - 
mmgton; the Rev. R. B. Doherty, who was in charge of 
Christ Church, New Bern, during the month of January; 
and Mr. W. H. R. Jackson, who is serving the churches 
in Southport and Whiteville during his vacation. 



On the occasion of his annual visit to the Chapel of the 
Cross, Chapel Hill, in January, Bishop Darst was invited 
to be the University preacher at an evening service in the 
college chapel. News reports of his sermon were highly 
laudatory. 



The Rev. W. R. Noe conducted a preaching mission in 
the Episcopal Church at Erwin, N. C, formerly Duke, 
during the first week in February. The Rev. A. C. D. 
Noe is Rector of this church. 



Many friends noted with regret the absence of Miss 
Mary Woolvin at this meeting of the Convention, but heard 
with pleasure that she is now on a tour of the Holy Land. 



The report of the Pension Fund Committee to the Con- 
vention, made by the Rev. W. R. Noe, showed that great 
progress is being made in the administration of this Fund. 
The Convention acted favorably on the recommendation of 
the treasurer that the Pension Fund be handled through 
the Executive S'ecretary. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



CHURCH KALENDAR— FEBRUARY-MARCH, 1926. 



"O live ye by the Kalendar, 

And with the good ye dwell; 

The Spirit that came down on them 

Will Lighten you as well." — Bishop Coxe. 



Feb. 17 — Ash Wednesday 

21 — First Sunday in Lent 
24 — S't. Mathias 
28 — Second Sunday in Lent 
7 — Third Sunday in Lent 
14 — Fourth Sunday in Lent 
21 — Fifth Sunday in Lent (Passion) 



Mch. 



(Violet) 
(Violet) 
(Red) 
(Violet) 
(Violet) 
(Violet) 
(Violet) 



MONEY FOR MITE BOXES. 



* The Mission Herald offers to the young people of * 

* East Carolina a commission on all new subscriptions * 

* and renewals secured during Lent. Many of the * 

* young people in the past have made money for their * 

* mite boxes in this way. * 

* For information, write, 

* the; mission herald. * 

* Plymouth, N. C. * 



DEPLORES LACK OF INTEREST IN CONVENTION. 



JUDGE ROUNTREE WOULD HAVE MORE LAYMEN 
ATTEND. 
Wilmington, N. C, Feb. 1, 1926. 
209 Murchison National Bank 

Rev. Theodore Partrick, Plymouth, North Carolina. 

My dear Mr. Partrick: 

As I had the honor of being elected an alternate, and 
attended the Triennial Convention at New Orleans, 1 would 
like to give my general impression of the Convention of the 
Church in this Diocese just held at St. John's Church, Wil- 
mington. 

I was deeply impressed by the ability, seriousness of 
purpose and deep spirituality manifested in the Triennial 
Convention by the clergy and laity alike. It was a most 
impressive gathering and its work inspiring. 

In our Diocesan Convention, one could not help being 
impressed by the thoughtful address of the Bishop, deliv- 
ered on Tuesday night; and the address of Dr. Patton was 
inspiring, — otherwise the Convention was disappointing. 

Of course, we must realize that the inclement weather 
was, to some extent, responsible for the small attendance, 
and it was wise to change the date of meeting to the first 
Wednesday in May of each year, but the lack of interest 
shown by the failure of laymen to attend was distinctly 
depressing. The purpose of this letter is not to solve but 
to state the problem of lay attendance at the Convention. 
Certainly, this Convention, composed chiefly of clergy, did 
many wise things, especially in emphasizing the need for, 
and its determination to increased efforts to evangelism, 
but that can scarcely be done without enlisting the earnest, 
continuous and determined assistance of the laity. 

It is to my mind perplexing to know why laymen will 
accept election in their respective parishes as delegates to 
the Convention and not attend. It must be due to one oi; 
both of two causes: 

1. Lack of care in selecting proper representatives, or, 

2. Lack of interest in the work of the Convention. 

It is probable that the latter is the real reason and the 
problem is to make the work of the Convention interesting. 
In that connection, it may be asked is there not some dan- 



ger that the Executive Council will absorb the active in- 
terest which ought to center in the Diocesan Convention, 
the only legislative body in the Diocese? Of course, the 
conception of the Executive Council is a distinct advance 
and its existence necessary, but is it not fraught with the 
possibility of danger along this line? 

However that be, is it not possible to arouse the interest 
of laymen by calling the attention of the various parishes 
to the importance of selecting men who can and will attend 
and give them something to think about to arouse their 
interest before the opening of the Convention? 

It would seem that the change in the apportionment 
from a voluntary suggestion to a binding obligation should 
have been, and should be, thoroughly considered, discussed 
and decided by the laymen, who, at any rate, must pay the 
assessment, and, yet, there were very few laymen in the 
Convention that accepted that suggestion of the Executive 
Council! 

Again, is it not possible to have a Committee on Program 
to meet a month or two before the Convention and formu- 
late the work for the Convention and send it to the various 
parishes for consideration? This might be done by the 
Bishop himself, with such assistance as he desires, or by 
a Committee appointed by him, or by the Executive Council, 
and distributed by the Executive Secretary. 

Assuredly, contemplated action by the General Conven- 
tion ought to be studied in the several parishes and se- 
riously considered in all Diocesan Conventions. 

By the way, is it not time to consider the advisability 
of appointing women delegates to the Convention? Judg- 
ing from the fruits, it is manifest that they take a deeper 
interest than the men in the work of the Church? 

At any rate, something should be done, and, as said 
above, the purpose of this letter is to attempt to arouse 
interest in the solution of the question, not to answer it. 
Very truly yours, 

GEO. ROUNTREE. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS PAID IN JANUARY, 1926. 



Those paying one dollar: W. C. Braswell, Mrs. C. S. Dixon 
Mrs. Charles Satchwell Mrs. Gabriel Holmes, Mrs. W. R. 
Capehart, Mrs. T. I. Phelps, Mrs. S. P. Adams, Mrs. J. R. 
Johnson, Mrs. A. J. Cahoon, C. B. Wheatley, Mrs. D. L. 
Dixon, Mrs. W. H'. Robbins, Mrs. Thomas Nixon, Mrs. J. L. 
Phelps, Miss Essie Mason, Mrs. R. E. Davis, Mrs. Laura B. 
Strange, Dr. B. L. Long, Mrs. W. I. Thompson, Miss Carrie 
Coke, Mrs. R. U. Norfleet, Mrs. W. F. Ausbon, Miss J. Louise 
Parker. Total $23.00. 

Those paying more than one dollar: Mrs. W. H. McClain, 
$2.00; C. C. Chadbourn, $1.50; Mrs. A. J. Ashford, $2.00; 
Mrs. D. W. Windley, $1.50; Mrs. W. I. Baxter, $1.50; Mrs. 
E. C. Conger, $1.50; Mrs. C. L. Foy, $2.00; F. K. Kramer, 
$4.00; Mrs. J. D. Traylor, $2.00; Mrs. O. B. Gibbs, $2.00; 
L. V. Morrill, $2.00; Mrs. Emily Payne, $2.00; Mrs. T. J. 
Mitchell, $2.00; Mrs. C. T. Windley, $2.00; Mrs. F. F. Cherry 
$5.00; E. R. Conger, $2.00; Mrs. Jessie Watson, $4.00; 
Miss Bessie Ireland, $2.00; Dr. W. C. Whitfield, $3.00; W. 
D. MacMillan, Jr., $3.00; Richard Meares, $2.00; Con- 
tributor, $2.60; Mrs. William Glover, $2.00; Mrs. H. G. 
Wood, $2.00; Mrs. H. M. Emerson, $2.00. Total, $57.60. 

Total for month, $80.60. 



The action of the Diocesan Convention in guaranteeing 
the sum of $7,000 to the Thompson Orphanage in 1926 was 
accompanied by the following resolution: "That in order 
to raise this amount we recommend to the various parishes 
that they set aside either the Thanksgiving or Christmas 
offerings, or both, for this purpose. Further, that we rec- 
ommend to each Parish a certain set amount which would 
represent its share of this obligation, and that they make 
that amount their objective." 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Final Report of Treasurer, Year 1925 



Parish or Mission. Apportion- 

FIRST. ment. 

Bdenton, S't. Paul's $ 3,000 . 00 

W ilmington, St. James 11,040 . 00 

Vv'oodville, Grace Church 500.00 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 100 . 00 

Winierville, St. Luke's 200.00 

SECOND. 

Creswell, St. David's $ 700.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 2,415.00 

Fayetteville, S't. John's 4,300.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 1,500 . 00 

ureenville, St. Paul's 2,100.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 1,170 . 00 

ivinston, St. Mary's 2,500 . 00 

A ew Bern 4,000 . 00 

i'lymouLh, Grace Churoh 1,000.00 

vVashinglon, St. Peter's 4,500 . 00 

Wilmington, S't. John's 3,000.00 

VVilmingn^u, it. Paul's 1,995 . 00 

Windsor, St. Thomas' 800 . 00 

THIRD. 

Ay den, St. James' 320 . 00 

Beaufort, S't. Paul's 600 . 00 

Belhaven, St. James' 500.00 

Eonnerton, St. John's 100.00 

Clinton, St. Paul's 400.00 

Gatesville, S't. Mary's 250.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 200.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 350 . 00 

Southport, St. Philip's 250.00 

Williamston, Church of Advent 500.00 

Winton, St. John's 200.00 

Columbia, S't. Andrew's 300.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 530 . 00 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 125.00 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 200 . 00 

Warsaw, Calvary 80 . 00 

Whiteville, Grace Church 90.00 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 100.00 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 130.00 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's 70.00 

S'wan Quarter, Calvary 60.00 

FOURTH. 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' 100.00 

Aurora, Holy Cross 500 . 00 

Bath, St. Thomas' 100.00 

Chocowinity, Trinity 100.00 

Fay etteville, St. Joseph's 200 . 00 

Griffon, St. John's 250.00 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 150.00 

Jessama, Zion 275 . 00 

Lake Landing, S't. George's 250 . 00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 400 . 00 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 100.00 

Seven S'prings, Holy Innocents' 240 . 00 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 100.00 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 300.00 

Wilmington, St. Mark's 400.00 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 150.00 

Eunyan, St. Stephen's 25 . 00 

Edenton, St. John-Evangelist 150.00 

Edward, Redeemer 25 . 00 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 50.00 

Fairfield, All Saints 35.00 



Paid by 


Paid by 


Lenten 




Balance 


Parish. 


Ch. School. 


Offering. 


Total Jan. 1,1926 


1 2,917.90 


$ 82.10 


$ 


$ 3,000.00 


$ 


10,187.92 


926.88 




11,114.80 




416.18 


39.22 


44.60 


500.00 




86.51 




20.00 


106.51 




176.00 


26.90 


7.00 


209.90 




572.49 


127.51 




700.00 




2,012.87 


411.88 




2,424.75 




3,773.49 


526.71 




4,300.20 




1,410.00 


90.00 




1,500.00 




1,250.00 


223.60 


73.77 


1,697.37 


402.63 


1,038.84 






1,038.84 


131.16 


696.70 


125.00 




821.70 


1,678.30 


3,025.00 






3,025.00 


*975.00 


6U0.00 


100.00 




700.00 


300.00 


3,645.00 


355.00 




4,000.00 


*500.00 


2,078.23 


93.00 


17.50 


2.188.73 


811.27 


1,751.41 


243.59 




1,995.00 




597.15 


100.00 


18.97 


716.12 


83.88 


270.54 




49.46 


320.00 




443.89 


88.50 


112.39 


644.78 




416.22 


83.78 




500.00 




87.53 






87.53 


12.47 


344.00 


55.00 




399.00 


1.00 


188.87 


22.21 


38.92 


250.00 






35.00 




35.00 


165.00 


282.19 


40.07 


30.31 


351.37 




200.00 


50.00 




250.00 




175.00 


44.00 




219.00 


281.00 


150.50 






150.50 


49.50 


214.18 


90.67 




304.85 




492.76 


37.24 




530.00 




95.00 


13.20 


12.65 


120.85 


4.15 


105.00 






105.00 


95.00 


101.00 






101.00 




65.00 


25.07 




90.07 




69.50 


30.50 




100.00 





60.00 


12.00 


21.91 


93.91 


36.09 


73.45 


5.13 


22.11 


100.69 




60.00 


1.95 


15.43 


77.47 




80.77 


4.23 




85.00 


15.00 


200.00 


45.52 


9.55 


255.07 


244.93 


78.80 


2.00 




80.00 


19.20 


100.00 






100.00 




200.00 






200.00 




206.87 


43.67 




250.63 




72.50 


23.00 


8.73 


104.23 


45.77 


68.88 


31.12 


13.87 


113.87 


161.13 


125.50 


6.21 


11.97 


142.98 


107.02 


400.00 






400.00 




45.00 




14.00 


59.00 


41.00 


220.00 




20.00 


240.00 




18.00 


4.54 




22.54 


77.46 


194.61 


252.92 




447.53 




252.04 


3.66 


11.79 


267.49 


132.51 


95.34 


7.66 




103.00 


45.00 


25.00 






25.00 




128.00 


22.14 


8.23 


158.37 




25.00 






25.00 




47.00 




3.00 


50.00 




35.00 






35.00 





THE MISSION HERALD. 



11 



FINAL REPORT OF TREASURER, 1925- -Continued. 



Parish or Mission. 



Faison, S't. Gabriel's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 

Lumberton, Trinity 

Maxton, St. Matthew's 

North West, All Souls' 

Sladesville, St. John's 

ffunbury, St. Peter's 

Trenton, Grace Church 

Washington, St. Paul's 

Wilmington, Ascension 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Ayden, St. Thomas' 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Kinston, Christ Church 

Murfreesboro, St. Biarnabas 

Oriental, St. Thomas' 

Pikeville. Mission 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Roper, n't. Ann's 

Haddock's Cross Roads, St. Stephen's. 

Williamston. St. Ignatius' 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission 

Wrightsville, "McCumbers", Mission... 
Farmville, Mission 



Total $55 



Apportion- 
ment. 
50.00 
50.00 
100.00 
50.00 
50.00 
30.00 
100.00 
125.00 
250.00 
25 . 00 
100.00 
100.00 
45.00 
40.00 
100.00 
125.00 
50.00 
75.00 
50.00 
25.00 
50.00 
48.00 
fiO.OO 
130.00 
30.00 
15.00 
20.00 
15.00 
983! 00 



Paid by 
Parish. 

50.00 



Paid by Lenten 
Ch. School. Offering. 
4.70 

6.81 



30.00 


20.00 


93.19 




24.00 


26.00 


30.00 




61.00 




25.00 


50.00 


29.36 




.73 


41.93 


63.00 


37.84 


10.00 




1.00 




29.62 


15.38 


100.00 






18.50 


50.00 




75.00 


9.01 


41.50 


5.00 


25.00 




50.00 




43.00 


8.78 


41.13 


1.31 


3.10 




30.00 




8.95 


6.05 


10.00 


5.00 




5.00 



23.00 



8.42 



Total 

54. 

50. 

100. 



Balance 
Jan. 1,1926 



50. 
30. 
61. 
75. 
52. 
42. 
100. 



43;873.31 



4,800.88 



583.12 



1. 

45. 
100. 
18. 
50. 
92. 
46. 
25. 
50. 
51. 
42. 

3. 
30. 
15. 
15. 

5. 
49,257! 



50.00 



39.00 

50.00 

198.00 



90.00 
44.00 



106.50 



3.50 



17.56 
126.90 



5.00 
10.00 

6,535:70 



* Note: These items, shown as a debit, are based on the apportionment originally made. Since the visit of the 
Rev. Mr. Noe and the every member canvass, the apportionment has been remitted for regularly. 



NOTE TAKEN OF DR. DRANE'S FIFTIETH 
ANNIVERSARY. 



b 



The following -resolutions were adopted at the meeting 
of the diocesan Convention: 

"Whereas the Rev. R. B. Drane. D.D., will on All Saint's 
Day this vear observe the 50th anniversary of his rector- 
ship of S't. Paul's, Edenton. the 43rd Annual Convention 
wishes to place itself on record in the following resolu- 
tions: 

1. That the long life and ministry of the Rev. R. B. 
Drane, DD.., in this old Parish has been a source of inspi- 
ration to the people of the Church in the whole Diocese. 

2. That the services of Dr. Drane as President of this 
Convention, President of the Standing Committee, denutv 
to the General Convention, and in many other diocesan 
capacities has been of great benefit to the Church in North 
Carolina. ~-™'n 

3. That this Convention extends to Dr. Drane its best 
wishes for a long continued life and ministry. 



EAST CAROLINA AGAIN IN THE FOREFRONT. 



The national treasurer of the Church, in his final report 
for the year 1925, says: "While total payments on the 
nuota of 1925 were $1,359,926 less than the amount asked 
for the budget, it is encouraging to note that thev were 
$40,183 greater than in 1924. In that year only 25 dioceses 
and districts were In the 100 per cent class, while in 1925 
there were 32." 

Fast Carolina was the only diocese In the Church that 
paid its full share of the priorities or advance work, as well 
as its budget. There were four missionary districts that 
did this; Arizona, Haiti, Eastern Oregon, and Honolulu. 



MRS. STATON THANKS WOMEN FOR GRACIOUS 
GIFT. 



February 4, 1926. 
To the Women of East Carolina: 

It was such a delightful surprise you all gave me at our 
Annual Meeting in the presentation of that loving cup. 

It is a beautiful gift rightly named. 

I was taken so by surprise — so overcome by your beau- 
tiful thought, — that I just could not properly thank you 
all. 

I wish to say just how much I do appreciate your kind- 
ness and all the love which prompted the gift. 

I shall always prize the loving-cup. Thank you so much. 

With love, Yours faithfully, 

FANNIE CHAS'E STATON. 



THE BISHOP'S ACTIVITIES. 



FROM JANUARY 1, 1925. TO DECEMBER 31, 1925. 

Visitations 120 

Sermons and addresses 180 

Celebrations of the H'oly Communion 32 

Baptisms 77 

Marriages 5 

Funerals 3 

Ordinations: Deacons 1, Priests 2 3 

Clergy deceased 2 

Clergy transferred 2 

Clergy received by Ordination 1 

Clergy received by transfer 2 

Lay Readers licensed 5 

Present number of L.ay Readers 68 

Number of Clergy, January 1, 1925 Zd 



12 



THt MISSION HERALD. 



Diocesan News. 



IMPORTANT ELECTIONS AT THE CONVENTION. 



WHAT THE CHURCH IS DOING IN THE DIOCESE OF 
EAST CAROLINA. 

The diocesan commission on Evangelism, through its 
chairman, the Rev. C. O. Pardo, has recently sent a ques- 
tionnaire to all the clergy, asking if they will hold preach- 
ing missions in 1926, and asking for their consent to the 
arrangements for missions in all of the churches in East 
Carolina during the year. The Commission reports that 
the response is most encouraging. 



An educational survey of the Sunday Schools in East 
Carolina has been called for by the diocesan Department 
of Religious Education. A questionnaire has been sent 
the schools, together with a statement of standards, and 
suggestions for improvement that can be made in 1926. 
The two things stressed are the keeping of full records 
and the organization of the school by departments or grade 
groups. 



By the action of Bishop Darst, with the approval of the 
Convention and under the advice of the Chancellor of the 
Diocese, St. Thomas' Church, Bath, has become a Diocesan 
Church, under the direct charge of the Bishop. Bishop 
Darst has named the Rev. J. N. Bynum as vicar. 



The excellent report of the committee on Insurance of 
Church Property to thd Convention, presented by the 
Rev. J. B. Gibble, showed that St. .John's Church, Bonner- 
ton, is the only Church property in the Diocese not in- 
sured. The total insurance now carried in the Diocese is 
$547,550.00. 



THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL HAS TWO MEETINGS. 



Following the dinner given on the evening before the 
Convention by Bishop Darst, the Executive Council met 
in St. .Tames parish house. Two matters that caused much 
discussion were an increased support of the Thompson 
Orphanage and a resolution to base appropriations to the 
parishes and missions on their willingness to accept and 
pay their apportionments. The first was disposed of by 
the framing of a resolution, guaranteeing the sum of 
$7,000 to the Orphanage in 1926. which was later presented 
to the Convention. The second matter was later presented 
to the Convention without prejudice, and received favorable 
action. 

On the evening of .January 27th, following the adjourn- 
ment of the Convention, the newly elected Council met in 
the Bishop's study. Here a number of matters referred 
to it by the Convention were disposed of, or postponed for 
later action. The Mission Herald in another place prints 
the resolutions that were passed in regard to S't. Paul's 
School, Beaufort. The diocesan budget for 1926 was exam 
ined in detail, and several items added to it. The Execu- 
tive Secretary, the Rev. W. R. >3oe, brought to the at- 
tention of the Council much correspondence that required 
its attention. Bishop Darst presided at both of these 
meetings, and Mr. Noe acted as secretary. 



ST. ANDREW'S AUXILIARY ELECTS OFFICERS- 

Columbia, N. C, .January 22, 1926. — The regular meeting 
of The Women's Auxiliary of St. Andrew's Church of Co- 
lumbia was held this afternoon at three o'clock. The 
following officers were elected for the ensuing year: 

President: Mrs. W. S'. Carawan; Vice-President: Mrs. 
C. B. McKeel; Treasurer: Mrs. C. W. Tatem; Secretary: 
Miss Essie Mason. 

Mrs. C. B. McKeel and Mrs. W. S. Carawan were eleCp' 
as representatives to the Council to be held in Wilming- 
ton beginning Monday, .January 25th. 



Treasurer of the Diort-se, Mr. Thomas D. Mi>ares. 

Chancellor, Mr. George B. Elliott. 

Editor of The Mission Herald, Rev. Theodore Partrick,Jr. 

Executive Council: Rev. Messrs. W. H. Milton, D.D., 
Archer Boogher, G. W. Lay, D.C.L., George F. Hill. .T. N. 
Bynum, Theodore Partrick, Jr. Messrs. George li. Elliott, 

B. R. Huske, E. K. Bishop, G. V. Cowper, George C. Royall 
john R. Tolar, .Jr. Mesdames H. J. MacMillan, £'. P. Adams 
and Richard Williams. 

Standing Committee: Rev. Messrs. R. B. Drane, D.D., 
Stephen Gardner, Theodore Partrick, Jr.; Messrs. E. R. 
Conger, and J. C. B. Ehringhaus. 

Examining Chaplains: Rev. Messrs. R. B. Drane, D.D., E. 
T. Jillson, W. H. Milton, D.D., Alexander Miller. W. O. 
Cone, and G. W. Lay, D.C.L. 

Trustees of the Diocese: Messrs. Clayton Giles and J. Y. 
Grainger. 

Trustee of University of South, Rev. G. F. Cameron. 

Board of Managers of Thompson Orphanage: Bishop 
Darst and Dr. W. C. Whitfield. 

Delegates to Provincial Synod: Rev. Messrs. W. R. Noe, 
W. H. Milton, D.D., R. B. Drane, D.D., Alexander Miller, 
Theodore Partrick, Jr. and S'tephen Gardner. Messrs. C. 

C. Chadbourn, J. R. Tolar, Jr., B. R. Huske, George C. 
Royall, George Rountree and George B. Elliott. 

Alternates: Rev. Messrs. G. F. Cameron, J. W. Heyes, 
George F. Hill, Archer Boogher, J. N. Bynum and B. T. 
Jillson; Messrs. Oscar Hardy, W. C. Whitfield, R. R. Gotten, 
H. F. Wilder, J. F. Bragaw, Jr., and J. T. McCabe. 



WOMEN HAVE GET-TOGETHER MEETING IN CLINTON 



On Wednesday, February 10th, the women of St. Paul's 
Church, Clinton, were hostesses to a number of visitors 
from near-by parishes and missions in a group meeting 
that proved to be both interesting and enjoyable. Mrs. S. 
P. Adams, head of the work of the women in the Convoei- 
tion of Wilmington, presided, and Mrs. W. H'. Herring, of 
Clinton, acted as secretary. 

After devotional exercises by the Rector of St. Paul's, 
the Rev. H. D. Cone, the address of welcome was given by 
Mrs. T. H. Partrick. Response was made by Mrs. W. I. 
Thompson, of Faison. 

This meeting was featured by the presence of a number 
of diocesan and convocational officers. Mrs. H. J. MacMil- 
lan, the new president of the Woman's Auxiliary and Pa- 
rochial S'ocielies of East Carolina, was present and made 
an address. She stated some of the aims for 1926, one 
of which was the enlistment of every woman in Church 
work. Mrs. James G. Staton, retiring president, spoke of 
her new work as treasurer of the United Thank Offering, 
and asked the women to assist her. Mrs. L. J. Poisson, 
of Wilmington, spoke of her work as box secretary in the 
Convocation. The Rev. Messrs. W. R. Noe and Theodore 
Partrick, Jr., were also present and responded to Mrs. 
Adam's invitation to speak. Mr. Noe explained a number 
of the diocesan undertakings. 

An elaborate and delicious dinner was served the visi- 
tors by the women of the Parish at the home of Mrs. T. H. 
Partrick. All those who had the good fortune to be pres- 
ent for the day's devotional and social features expressed 
themselves as delighted with the hospitality they received. 



The Sunday S'chools of East Carolina have again been 
given their quota for the Lenten Mite Box offering. This 
year the diocesan goal is $6,000, as it was last year, and 
the parochial apportionments are about the same. In 1925 
the Lenten offering of the young people was in excess of 
$4,000, and it is believed that with added effort the goal 
can be attained in 1926. The mite boxes are already in the 
hands of the young people. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



33 



Young People's Department. 

Rev. J. M. Taylor, Secretary for the Young People's Work. 
Miss Elizabeth Moore, Editor of Department. 



The Rev. J. M. Taylor received recently a most attractiv'e 
call to a church in Miami, Pla., where his work would be 
with the young people. It is hoped that he will remain in 
East Carolina. 



Miss Louise Gaither, treasurer of the diocesan organiza- 
tion, has recently been ill, but we hear with great pleas- 
ure that she has fully recovered. 



The Rev. Frank D. Dean was one of the speakers at a 
recent meeting of the young people of the diocese of South 
Carolina, in Charleston. Dr. Dean reports that the young 
people of that diocese are thoroughly aroused. 



THE TREASURER CALLS FOR FUNDS. 

The branches of the Young People's Service League in 
East Carolina have received a letter from the diocesan 
treasurer, Miss Louise Gaither, of Hertford, giving them 
the amount of the assessment laid against them for the 
salary of Mr. Taylor. It will be remembered that at the 
Conference in Fayetteville the young people pledged them- 
solved to give $500.00 toward this object. In her letter 
Miss Gaither called attention to the fact that she had 
received only $2.00 of this amount, and urged immediate 
payment. 



THE5 RIGHT SPIRIT. 

The heart of the treasurer was made glad to receive 
such a letter from the Rev. G. F. Cameron: "Is every parish 
and mission supposed to contribute to the Y. P. S. L., 
whether they have a young people's work or not? What- 
ever the arrangement, bet your life, you will have my 
co-operation. We have a Y. P. S'. L. at Holy Innocents, 
Seven Springs, and if you will write direct to them, 
I am sure that they will remit their part with haste. As- 
suring you of my deep interest in your work and that you 
may always depend upon me in helping you in any way I 
can, I am, sincerely yours, G. F. Cameron." 



YOUNG PEOPLE OF ST. ANDREW'S', COLUMBIA, 
ACTIVE. 

A Young People's Service League has been organized at 
St. Andrew's Church, Columbia, and is now very active. 
Organized during the meeting of the Convocation in Co- 
lumbia, with the assistance of the Rev. J. M. Taylor, the 
League has grown steadily. Starting with 12 members, 
it now has a total membership of 36. The membership is 
divided into two groups, 1 and 2. Included in its member- 
ship are a number of young people from the other churches 
in town. 

The League is under the leadership of Miss Helen Tatem 
and Mrs. Earl Cahoon. It has met with a great deal of 
enthusiasm among the young people, and they are giving 
their loyal and hearty co-operation. 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S' SERVICE LEAGUE OF ST. JOHN'S' 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

January 8th, 1926,, 
The S'enior group of the Y. P. S. L. of St. John's, Fayette- 
ville, has just ended a most interesting and worthwhile 
quarter of the year's work. 

The election of officers for the next quarter took place 



at the last meeting, the following being elected: Mary 
MacRae, President; Alberta Hale, Vice-President; George 
O'Hanlon, Secretary, and Thomas Badger, Treasurer. 

We feel that the coming weeks with the Lenten work 
and thoughts will be very full for the League. 

We have endeavored to serve in all the five fields but 
have done more in our community and parish than else^ 
where. 

A visit to the Leaguers to the Preventorium, near this 
City, brought cheer to the young people who are being 
brought back to health there. We paid the wages of a girl 
to her family, that this girl might leave the mill and rest 
at the preventorium. 

Baskets have been sent to the needy in the community. 
From the proceeds of a rummage sale we bought attractive 
and useful presents for the boys and girls in a Mission 
School in Virginia. Two families were assigned to the 
league to be provided for at Christmas and it was a great 
joy to feel that these families would awake on Christmas 
morning and find that Santa Claus had visited them leav- 
ing well filled stockings. 

On Christmas Eve the Leaguers, after a marshmallow 
roast by a roaring fire in the League Rooms, chaperoned 
by our Counsellors, Mrs. W .N. Tillinghast and Mrs. John 
Anderson, went out carolling to the shut-ins of the congre- 
gation, also to the hospitals and jail, singing the glad tid- 
ings that "Christ was born." 

It was a great pleasure to have with us at the Christmas 
holidays our boys and girls from college whom we sent off 
in September after a rousing good-bye party. Letters from 
these absent ones show that they are thinking of the League 
at St. John's. 

Every Thursday night we have a choir practice under our 
efficient Director Mrs. Livingstone. The League has charge 
of the S'ervice every other Sunday night and several real 
soloists have developed from the Junior Choir. The boys 
reading the Lessons, acting as ushers and taking up the 
offering, 

A Hospital Committee takes magazines to the wards 
and whenever possible flowers to cheer the lonely ones. 

S'everal of our members attended the Older Boys Confer- 
ence of the Y. M. C. A. at Goldsboro in November. One of 
them, Joe Pemberton, was elected President of this body. 
Others of our boys have been asked to give talks on "Y" 
work before local clubs. We feel that all our Leaguers 
are doing their part in some way toward becoming good 
Churchmen and Churchwomen and taking their places ; s 
worth while citizens of the community. 

We are looking forward to the visit of our Y. P. S. L. 
Secretary, the Rev. J. M. Taylor, who will give us greater 
inspiration for our work. 

With every good wish for all the Leaguers in East Caro- 
lina, Faithfully, 

MARY B. MacRAE, 
Retiring Secretary. 



NEWS OF THE FARMVILLE LEAGUE. 

The League in Emmanuel Parish, Farmville, is only a 
small matter so far as numbers go. And yet we think we 
have accomplished quite a little since we came together 
for our fall and winter work. We have filled two boxes 
which were sent off in good season, sold candy at the 
annual bazaar of our Parish, sold fifty Parish calendars. 
We hold meetings every S'unday night at 6:30 and have a 
regular program. At present we are working to raise 
enough money to furnish a room in the parish house 
which the older folks say they intend to build. One of 
our Junior members entertained the League at the Rector's 
home quite recently at which we had a good attendance. 
Our aim is to increase our numbers very much during the 
present year. JOHN T. HARRIS. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE AND TRAINING INSTITU- 
TION, CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



NOl ES FROM THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE BOARD 
oi'^ MANAGERS AND OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST. 



At the Annual Meeting of the Board of Managers of 
the Thompson Orphanage and Training Institution held 
at the institution on January 7th. Mr. F. O. Clarkson, 
tne trustee of the Endowment Fund, announced that the 
Endowment Fund had increased from about $18,000 in 1920 
to $28,000 to date, and upon making this report he was in- 
formed by the Board of Managers that the fund v/as increas- 
ed $16,000 by the generosity of Mrs. Frances K. Frercks, 
of S'alisi-iay, N. C. This announcement was received by the 
boaru and trustees with profound appreciation for the gen- 
erosity of Mrs. Frercks. The gift was designated as the 
Peter A. and Francis Frercks Memorial Endowment Fund, 
being founded in memory of Mrs. Frercks' late husband 
and young son who died in early boyhood. Mrs. Frercks 
was Miss McRae and has been a life long member of the 
Episcopal Church. She is well known in Charlotte and is 
a cousin of Mrs. James A. Bell of that city. The Endow- 
ment Fund will Le invested by the trustees and the interest 
used for the maintenance of the institution in accordance 
with the terms of the trust. Suitable resolutions were 
passed by the Board of Managers expressing their apprecia- 
i.ion for this gift. 

I'his year the annual meeting was held in the Kenan 
Cottage, one of the three new cottages. There were pres- 
ent from the Diocese of North Carolina, Rt. Rev. Joseph 
B. Cheshire, D.D., Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Penick, D.D., the 
\en. Wm. H. Hardin, Rev. Edwin A. Osborne, Mr. Fred W. 
Glover, Mr. Joseph G. Shannonhouse; from the Diocese 
of East Carolina,— Rt. Rev. Thos. C. Darst, D.D., Mrs. 
3. W. Tillinghast; from the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, — Mrs. S. Westray Battle. 

The Rev. John L. Jackson, Treasurer of the Building 
Fund, was also present at the meeting and made a report 
on the condition of the building fund. The Board of Man- 
agers expressed sincere appreciation of the manner in 
which Mr. Jackson has carried on the administration of 
this fund. 

The Executive Committee having passed a resolution that 
the books of the Treasurer of the Current Fund should be 
held open until January 15th, the annual report included 
receipts and expenditures only up to the end of the year. 
'Since then the books have been closed and the final report 
shows a total of cash receipts $42,492.23, with a total of ex- 
pense of $39,553.40, leaving a cash balance on January 21st 
as of Jan. 1st of $7,310.96. It should be noted that these 
figures, considerably larger than last year due to the 
fact that the books were held open until the 21st of January, 
and the change to this new system caused a considerable 
inflation of the receipts and expenditures in comparison 
to 1924 when the books were closed on the last day of the 
year. This change was made in order to correctly apply 
on 1925 large balances of 1925 contributions from the Na- 
tion Wide Campaign and Endowment Fund received after 
the beginning of the new year, and also to charge on 1925 
the expenditures for December bills, thus enabling, the 
treasurer to enter the new year with all bills paid. 

The report of the Superintendent for the year showed 
that three new cottage homes had been built, equipped and 
occupied; namely, the Baker Cottage for boys, erected in 
memory of Ashby Lee Baker by his wife, Minnie Tucker 
Baker, and two sons, Ashby Lee Baker and Julian Tticker 
Baker; the Christ Church Cottage for girls, erected by St. 
Agnes' Guild and other members of Christ Church, Raleigh; 
and the Kenan Cottage for younger children, erected by 
Mrs. Graham Kenan, of Wilmington, in memory of her 
sister, Mary Lily Kenan Flagler. A beautiful new laundry, 
fully equipped with all the latest machinery, which the 



older boys and girls operate, turning out work every bit 
as fine as that of any professional laundry. The new laun- 
dry was contributed by St. Paul's, Winston-Salem. A cen- 
tral heating plant, with which all the buildings are con- 
nected and vvnich makes every building warm and comfort- 
aule tor the first time in the nearly lorty years existence 
of the institution, has been in operation since the first cold 
weather of the early autumn. A splendid concrete drive- 
way with concrete walks to every building has been laid. 
Tne surveying and grading for these was done under the 
direction, of Mr. Earl S. Draper, landscape architect, with- 
out cost and as a personal contribution to the building 
fund. Several much needed buildings have been added to 
the equipment of the farm and a portion of the farm land 
enclosed m a strong wire fence for the protection of our 
herd of caLtle. liepairs have been made to the chapel 
tioor and the wood work of the Stedman and Federation 
coLtages painted. There remain to be built according to 
tne Duiidiug program, an administration building and two 
more cottages. 

The report of the Superintendent also disclosed that 
there are eight children more this year than last, 112 chil- 
dren all told, 62 girls and 50 boys. 

Tne long drought of last summer destroyed most of the 
truck in the big garden as well as that of the small boys' 
individual gardens on which they had expended much 
labor. It also burned up a great deal of the pasturage 
which resulted in the yield of milk during the summer 
being much smaller than it ordinarily is. This of course 
sent tile cost of food for the children and food for the stock 
skyward. With this in mind and the payments for insur- 
ance on the five new buildings and contents of same, and 
salaries for additional staff workers, the condition of the 
finances seems encouraging. 

The Orphanage is grateful for the fact that the three 
dioceses are planning to include in their budgets the 
amounts necessary for the support of the Orphanage. If 
the three dioceses will meet the definite amounts appor- 
tioned to them for the support of the Orphanage, the Or- 
phanage can then meet its budget which has been drawn 
by the finance committee and approved by the Executive 
Committee. 

Important resolutions adopted at the meeting were: 

That it is the sense of this meeting that the Osborne 
Thanksgiving ott'ering for the Orphanage taken on the 
Sunday nearest the birthday of the Rev. Mr. Osborne, 
which is May 6th, be made an annual offering, and that all 
parishes and missions be so notified. Any amounts con- 
tributed to that purpose may be applied as a credit on the 
Forward Movement apportionment if so desired. 

The present Executive Committee is re-elected. The 
members of the committee are: The Rt. Rev. Edwin A. 
Penick, D.D., chairman. Rev. Edwin A. Osborne, Rev. George 
Floyd Rogers, Mr. J. G. Shannonhouse, Mr. F. W.'-Glover, 
Mrs. Sam Maxwell, Mr. R. H. Bouligny and Mr. Rawlinson 
Myers, all of Charlotte, Mr. W. L. Balthis of Gastonia, 
and Mr. Thomas H. Webb, of Concord. 

Mr. Francis O. Clarkson was re-elected treasurer of the 
permanent and endowment fund. 

The Hon. Hamilton C. Jones was elected attorney for the 
Orphanage to succeed Mr. Frank M. S'hannonhouse, de- 
ceased, who for nearly a decade rendered valuable service 
to the institution as legal advisor. 

Much gratification was expressed by the Board over the 
improvements which have been made at the Orphanage 
during the past year. 

CONTRIBUTIONS' RECEIVED FROM THE DIOCESE OF 
EAST CAROLINA FROM DEC. 25 TO JAN. 25. 

CASH. 

Middletown, St. George's W. A $ 15.50 

Oriental, S't. Thomas' W. A 2 . 00 

Vanceboro, Mrs. L. E. Smith 1 . 00 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



15 



Wilmington, Miss Wilhelmina Harlow 8.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 4.75 

Roper, St. Luke's 5.06 

Pollocksville Mission 3.20 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 18.00 

Wilmington, St. .James' 3.40 

Elizabeth City— F. K. Cramer 20 . 00 

Merry Hill — Emily, Richard and Whitmell Smith- 
wick 1.00 

Lake Landing. S't. George's 2.90 

Edenton, St. Paul's 19.49 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 1.60 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 53 . 10 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 6'" 

Plymouth, Grace 35 . 00 

Wilmington, S't. Paul's 15.25 

Wilmington, Good S'hepherd Church School 12.92 

Woman's Auxiliary, Diocese of East Carolina 100.00 

IN KIND. 

St. Thomas' W. A. — Box of clothing for small child. 

Washington, St. Peter's Church Sch. — Christmas present 
for every child. 



EAST CAROLINA UNABLE TO FINANCE ST. PAUL'f| 
SCHOOL. 



PITT COUNTY WOMEN HAVE MEETING. 



GOOD PAPERS AND INTERESTING DIg'CUSSION. 
(Greenville Reflector, Jan. 16.) 

The Pitt County meeting of the Episcopal women held 
.r'esterday at St. Paul's Episcopal Church was a, comnlete 
success. There were representatives present from Ayden, 
Farmville, St. John's Parish, Grifton, Winterville, Pactolus, 
iind E'tokes, and visitors from Wilmington, Washington 
Williamston, and Robersonville. 

Among the clergymen in attendance were the Rev. V\'r 
ter R. Noe, Diocesan Secretary, Wilmington; Rev. C, O. 
Pardo, Williamston. Rev. Stephen Gardner, Washington; 
Rev. J. W. Heyes, Farmville, and Rev. Geo. F. Cameron, 
Ayden. 

The program was carried out practically m full as print- 
ed in the "Daily Reflector" last Tuesday, and it was splen- 
didly received. The Diocesan officers who were present, 
Mrs. James Grist Staton, of Williamston, Mrs. S'. P. Adams 
and Mrs J. K. Woolvin, of Wilmington, and Mrs. Guy C. 
Small, of Washington, made inspiring addresses and the 
papers read by Mrs. J. W. Heyes, of Farmville, and Mrs. 
Cox, of Winterville were far above the average. These were 
requested for publication in the Diocesan paper — The Mis- 
sion Herald. 

The Rev. W. R. Noe outlined the needs of the Diocese 
in an effective address. 

A collection was taken towards furnishing a memorial 
for old St. John's Church to the memory of Mrs. Polly 
Smith, the sainted mother of the Cox and Smith families. 
and the founder of the Church at Winterville. 

The program was graced with solos by Mrs. Joyner, of 
Farmville, Miss F' oks of Ayden, and Miss Bessie Brown, 
of Greenville. 

The following officers were elected for 1926. 

President, Mrs. W. C. Askew. Farmville; Vice-President, 
Mrs. W. H. Dail, Jr., Greenville; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. 
Helen Turnage, Ayden. 

A bountiful chicken salad luncheon was served by the 
ladies in the class room adjoining the church for which 
they were heartily thanked by the visiting friends. 



TURNOVER. 
Not the edible variety but that kind which is the portion 
of a capital fund returned each year as amortized, and re- 
distributed. The latter variety affords constant enjoyment 
and yet is never consumed. 



The matter of financing S't. Paul's School, Beaufort, and 
""bus insuring a continuance of its life and usefulness, 
which has engagetf the attention of the diocese of East 
Carolina for several years, was brought to a necessary but 
unhappy conclusion at the meeting of the Executive Coun- 
cil of January 27th. The Diocese through the efforts of the 
Rishop. Executive Secretary, and others was unable to 
tind the money necessary to maintenance. Mr. Meares in 
his annual treasurer's report, stated that he had received 
the sum of $1230.00 in 1925, as the result of the campaign 
to secure memberships in a St. Paul's School Association. 
Other money was pledged, however, but not a sufficient 
amount. 

At the meeting of the Executive Council Mr. Noe made 
a report of the efforts to finance the school, and following 
this these two resolutions were passed.. 

"Resolved, That the Executive Council of the Diocese 
of East Carolina regretfully advises the management of 
St. Paul's S'chool, Beaufort, that it is unable to come to the 
financial assistance of the School or to aid it in continuing 
its work. 

Resolved, further, that a copy of this resolution be sent 
to the school authorities, with the advice that the Executive 
Council, as representative of the Diocese, deeply regrets 
its inability to aid in the carrying on of the excellent work 
done by this institution." 



REVEREND. 



Probably there is no calling in the world in whici) a man 
receives so many titles as the ministry. During the years 
of your rector's ministry he has been called Mister, Father, 
Deacon. Elder, Brother, Pastor, Rector, Doctor, Reverend. 
Revenue, Reverner, etc. The two last are very amusing and 
are only used by the most ignorant people. However, it is 
amazing what a large percenta.ge of intelligent people will 
persist in making the .grammatical blunder of addrob.s ng a 
clergyman "Reverend .Jones". "Reverend" can be used 
correctly only when followed by "Doctor", "Father," "Mis- 
ter," or the Christian name of the clergyman — i.e., the I>pv- 
erend Mr. Jones or the Reverend John Jones. Qn'r.e n 
number of St. John's people re.gularly address your rector 
as "Reverend Butler," and he finds that his experieu'^e is 
that of his brethren in the ministry. 

Recently our nel.ghbor and .good friend. Reverend Mr. 
Atwill, wrote a little poem apropos of this matter. AVith 
his permission, I am publishing it herewith: 

Call me Brother, if you will. 
Call me Parson, better still. 
Or If, perchance, the Catholic frill 
Doth your heart with longing fill — 
Thou.gh plain Mister fills the bill, 
If that title lacketh thrill. 
Then even Father brin.gs no chill 
Of hurt or rancor or ill will. 

To no D.D. do I pretend. 

Though Doctor doth some honor lend. 

Preacher, Pastor, Rector, Friend, 

Titles, almost without end. 

Never grate and ne'er offend; 

A loving ear to all I bend. 

But how the man my heart doth rend 

Who blithely calls me REVEREND! 

Will not all of St. John's people co-operate in this effort 
to stop a practice which is bad English? — Rev. Frederick 
D. Butler in The S't. John Evangelist. 



16 



THK MISSION HERALD. 



OWN A SUMMER HOME at CAROLINA BEACH 

Carolina Beach is on the Main Land. A Beach that you can drive your Automobile to the Water's edge, 
A good hard road from Wilmington. A new modern hotel now under construction that will be completed 
for the season of 1926. Lots are sold on reasonable terms and as an investment they are ideal. Informa- 
tion gladly given. Call or write any authorized representative. 

CAROLINA BEACH CORPORATION 

OWNERS AA^D DEVELOPERS OF 

CAROLINA BEACH 

Offices at CAROLINA. BEACH, N. C. WILMINGTON, N. C, WWSTON- SALEM- N. C. 

OFFICERS:— S. C. Ogburn, President; W. F. Schaffner, Vice-President; W. W. Walsh, Vice-President; 

E. P. Yates, Vice-President; E. D. Turner, F'ecretary-Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS: S. C. Ogburn, S. C. Clark, A. V. Nash, W. F. Shaffner, E. P. Yates, E. D. Turner,W. W. Walsh 
J. L. BECTON, C. E., Wilmington, N. C. Engineer in charge of development. 
REFERENCES: Any Bank or Mercantile Agency. 



-'■^^ ^ "-*■ - ^- ^'-- -^' ■■■^ ■ ^ - -^ 



TURNOVER. 



Illustration. The Annual Report of the Church Building 
Fund shows a turnover of $110,000 of the Capital Fund 
restored and loaned again to 22 Parishes to complete the 
construction of 10 Churches, 1 Rectory and 13 Parish 
Houses. 



CURTIS PERKINS 

Clothier — Hatter— Furnisher 

GREENVILLE, N. C. 




Eureka Dye Works, C. D. Myers, Mgr. 

Cleaners, Dyers and Pressers. ^ 

Mai! orders given prompt and careful "^ 

attention. <^ 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 4 



When in Elizabeth City, N. C. 
^ CALL ON 

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President 



J. C. WILLIAMS, 
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THIS MONTH 
A Statement on Evangelism. 

Annual Report of Woman's Aux= 
iliary and Parochial Societies. 
A Sketch of Miss Disosway. 
News of the Churches. 




li'UtuauiiWu^mTi 



/Iftarcb, 1926 



Published by the Diocese of East Carolina at Plymouth, N. C. 




THE MISSION HERALD. 



Oamt 9//ary'cf School^ 

h JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Rev. WARREN W. WAY, Rector. 

An Episcopal School for Girls. Four years High School and two 
years College Courses. Accredited. Special courses: Music, Art, 
Expression, Home Economics, Business. 

MODERN EQUIPMENT— 20-ACRE CAMPUS. ' 

Advent session opens Sept. 15, 1925. For catalogue address: 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager, Raleigh N. C. 






'^ — ii'-iiO:^ 



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An elementary and preparatory school for hoys and girls 
Lovely location on coast of North Carolina; healthful cli- 
mate; comfortable room's; v^rholesom© food; daily prayer; 
preparation for college; athletics; piano; band and orchestra — 
— a home atmosphere fostered. 
Accommodation for 50 boarders. 

For further information apply to, 

MR. E. F. DUNCAN, Principal. 




O 



1. Bishop William Temple's "Personal Religion and the Life of 
Fellowship." This is the ; ook recommended to the people of the 
Church for Lenten ■ '"'ing by the Bishop of London. 

2. The Rev. Dr. W. C. Bell's, "Sharing In Creation." This is a 
book that will appeal to laymen who wish to learn how the results 
of modern scholarship contribute to the substance of the Chrisitan 
faith. 

Order now through the Mission Herald. 

Write the REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR., 

Plymouth, N. C. 



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Prepares boys at cost for Col- 
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The Mission Herald. 



Vol. XL. 



PLYMOUTH N. C. MARCH, 1926. 



No. 3 



MEETING OF NATIONAL COMMISSION 

ON EVANGELISM 



BISHOP FREEMAN ISSUES A STATEMENT 



The Initial Meeting of the National Commission on Evan- 
gelism was held at the Church Missions House, New York, 
on February 2ord, with nine of the twelve members present. 
The Chairman, Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D.D., Bishop of 
East Carolina, presided. The Rev. Arthur J. Gammack, of 
Fitchburg, Mass., was elected Secretary. After a full and 
helpful discussion the following sub-committees were ap- 
pointed: 

SCHOOLS' OF THE PROPHETS— Rt. Rev. Irving P. John- 
son, Chairman. The other members of this sub-committee 
being Bishop Oldham, of Albany, and Dr. Floyd Tomkins, 
of Philadelphia. 

LAY E^VANGELIS'M— Mr. Courtenay Barber, of Chicago, 
Chairman. Other members — Mr., Willard Warner, of Ten- 
nessee, Mr. John Stewart Bryan, of Virginia, and Mr. 
Samuel Thorne, of New York. 

Bishop Darst was asked to act as Chairman of the sub- 
committee on DIOCESAN ORGANIZATION AND PREPA- 
RATION FOR THE BISHOP'S' CRUSADE. Other members 
of this committee are Bishops Freeman and Oldham, Rev. 
Messrs. John S. Bunting, of St. Louis, A. J. Gammack, of 
Mass., and Dean McDonald, of California. Messrs. John 
Stewart Bryan, of Virginia, and S'amuel Thorne, of New 
York. 

Bishop Darst is planning to speak at the Synod of the 
Pacific in Long Beach, California, in May, and is arranging^ 
to address interested groups of clergymen and laymen in a 
number of the large cities of the country on his way back 
from California. 

At the conclusion of the initial meeting of the National 
Commission on Evangelism on February 23rd, the Bishop 
of Washington made the following statement: 

Evangelism in the Church, freshened and intensified 
evangelism through the efforts of clergy and laity, this is 
the supreme need of the hour. More and more it has been 
realized in the post-war period that the one thing that can 
save the world in its present critical situation is the recog- 
nition and practice of those great principles of life given to 
mankind by Jesus Christ. In these latter days, the Church, 
as an institution, has become greatly involved in mechan- 
isms and institutions, and her clergy too much occupied 
with administrative details. Too great emphasis laid upon 
these things has seriously impaired the church's preaching 
ministry. It is growing increasingly clear that these conti:- 
tions cannot longer continue and that, if the Church is to 
be restored to its place of commanding influence, it must 
place a fresh emphasis upon the evangelistic note. Acces- 
sions to the Church's membership through confirmation 
and indeed the multiplication of organizations and the 
setting up of large institutions, do not necessarily register 



the Church's spiritual growth. We are being repeatedly 
reminded that the teaching office of the Church has been 
sadly neglected and that widespread ignorance concerning 
the vital things of its ministry is prevalent both here and 
in England. The Archbishop of Canterbury and other dig- 
nitaries of the Anglican Church, realizing this situation, 
are making an urgent appeal for the revival of the pro- 
nitaries of the Anglican Church, realizing the situation, 
note. 

The new Commission on Evangelism, had its first meet- 
ing in New York recently and felt impelled to bring to the 
attention of the whole Church the criticalness of the pres- 
ent situation, and to make an urgent appeal to clergy and 
laity alike to lay aside the less important things and to 
give themselves more completely to the ministry of the 
Word and of prayer. The Commission feels that without 
multiplying more machinery, that an urgent appeal should 
be made at this time to place a fresh emphasis upon the 
central fact of the Church's Mission which is, salvation 
through Jesus Christ. The very fact that this post-war 
period has witnessed the abrogation of wholesome conven- 
tions and practices, and the breaking down of old restraints, 
together with disregard for law, lays a burden upon the 
Church that it cannot lightly esteem, and that unrecognized 
and unassumed may result in confusion worse confounded. 
President Coolidge recently said concerning certain law- 
less tendencies "We cannot sulDStitute the authority of law 
for the virtue of man." The failure of law to effect salu- 
tary and wholesome reforms is primarily due to the fact 
that the moral character of the people is at low ebb. To 
blink the facts in the case or to disregard the church's most 
solemn duty in the present situation, may precipitate a 
condition from which we shall not recover for generations 
to come. If the Church, through its consecrated clergy 
and laity could, through unity of effort, give evangelism 
the place it deserves in the Church's program, in fine, if 
every man and woman who believes in the sovereignty and 
saving power of Jesus Christ would address themselves to 
the extension of His Kingdom among men, we should ex- 
perience such a revival of spiritual power as we have not 
known in our day and generation. If our nation responded 
to the call to arms in defense of civilization, surely the 
church should respond to a far more serious call in an age 
fraught with grave and threatening perils. 

The Commission on Evangelism feels that without delay 
an appeal should be made to the whole Church to recognize 
the urgency of a call to give evangelism the place of prece- 
dence in the Church's ministry. To this end every Bishop, 
Rector and layman is asked to give solemn consideration 
to this appeal for a revival of evangelism in the Church. 



TKE MISSION HERALD. 



WHAT THE WOMEN OF EAST CAROLINA DID IN 1925. 



REPORT OF THEl WOMAN'S' AUXILIARY AND PARO- 
CHIAL SOCIETY TO CONVENTION. 



Rt. Rev. Father in God: 

We respectfully report that 1925 has seen our work ad- 
vance along many lines. We have given more money and 
sent better boxes, but also we have gained in spirituality 
which cannot be counted in figures nor dollars and cents. 
The women are becoming more business-like in remitting 
most promptly to the Treasurer the amounts assessed. This 
makes our book-keeping easier, assures us of meeting our 
obligations and leaves the organizations free to put atten- 
tion and money on something which may be of individual 
interest. 

In our educational work we are pleased to note an in- 
crease in discussion groups and a number of parish leaders 
being developed. Lent is not the only time in which some 
form of study is done by the women. This is a decided 
advance as during Lent many services do not always give 
the required time for active study which was at one time 
thought sufficient. The subjects studied are The Bioic, 
Alaska, The S'tory of the Program, Program Presented, 
The World and 1, Bible Class Quarterly, Church History, 
My Father's Business, The Search for Peace, and Chinas 
Real Revolution. Church papers have also been read at 
many meetings. 

We are setting our faces towards the future with new 
plans and high hopes for better accomplishments. An Edu- 
cational Institute under the leadership of Miss Laura Boyer 
will be held in Fayetteville the first week in May. 

On the Honor Roll in the Convocation of Edenton are 
the following: Ayden, Aurora, Belhaven, Columbia, Cres- 
well, Edenton, Elizabeth City, Farmville, Gatesville, Green- 
ville, Grifton, Hertford, Lake Landing, Plymouth, Rober- 
Eonville, Roxobel, Washington, Williamston, ^\^oodville, 
Windsor, Winterville and Yeatesville or Pinetown. 

In the Convocation of Wilmington: Clinton, Faison, Fay- 
etteville, Goldsboro, Hope Mills, Kinston, Lumberton; All 
Saints and Christ Church, New Bern; Southport; Snow 
Hill; Good Shepherd, S't. James, St. John's and St. Paul's 
and St. John's Mission, Wilmington. 

The three Auxiliary branches which have spent the larg- 
est amounts are Section C, St. James, Wilmington, $976.76; 
St. John's, Wilmington, $918.40, and Section A. St. James', 
Wilmington, $736.10. 

The three Guilds contributing the largest sums are St. 
Mary's, St. James, Wilmington, $2,255.35; St. Paul's, Green- 
ville, $958.35; Christ Church Parish Guild, New Bern, 
$601.81. 

The three Auxiliary and Parochial Societies are St. 
David's, Creswell, $1,014.49; Emmanuel, Farmville, $785.04, 
and Chapel of the Holy Cross, Aurora, $359.06. 

The organizations with a membership of less than a dozen 
who are doing good work are the following: Faison, Grif- 
ton, Lake Waccamaw, Oriental, Robersonville, Show Hill, 
Whiteville, Winterville, Woodville and Yeatesville, or Pine- 
town. 

The work of the Order of the Daughters of the King 
is done faithfully by its members as individuals, there 
being no active Chapters. The leaders feel that the Auxil- 
iary cares for the spiritual work which is often done in 
ether parts of the world by Daughters of the King. 

The Guild of St. Barnabas for Nurses finds it difficult 
to form many Guilds among the few hospitals located in 
the Diocese. Mrs. Darst will be glad to correspond with 
any Rector who has in his parish a Hospital with nurses 
who may be helped by the formation of a Guild. 

The Church Periodical Club work has been held together 
by our faithful Correspondent, Mrs| Alfred M. Waddell. All 
national financial pledges have been met. The increased 
cost of postage has proven a hardship for the work of the 



Club. Circumstances over which Mrs. Waddell has had 
no control have been a bit discouraging. 

The Supply Department or Box Work is steadily improv- 
ing. The Store Room has been able to meet the demands 
made upon it. The boxes as requested by Headquarters 
were sent to three points in Virginia and one in Georgia. 
In our Diocese we are helped by having boxes from others 
sent for St. Paul's School, Beaufort, and Galilee Mission 
School, Creswell. 

The Church School Service League has seventeen parish 
branches with nearly two thousand members. At this time 
there is only one Junior Auxiliary which has eight mem- 
bers. St. Peter's, Washington, Good Shepherd and St. 
James, Wilmington, report Little Helpers. The Box work 
has not yet reached the standard set, but many others 
were made happy by the Christmas gifts from our Diocese. 
The Birthday Offering presented at New Orleans was 
$508.03, which sum is East Carolina's share for the past 
three years. St. John's, Fayetteville, is the banner Church 
School Service League, but Emanuel, Farmville; St. Paul's, 
Greenville; St. Peter's, Washington; Good Shepherd and 
St. James, Wilmington; and St. Luke's, Winterville, had ex- 
cellent reports. The financial reports of the Church School 
Service League are as follows for the Five Fields of Service: 

Parish $2,372 . 35 

Community ill . 82 

Diocese 484 . 53 

Nations 180.70 

World 199 . 08 

Lenten Offering — (As reported to date).. 3,152.88 

Birthday Thank Offering— 1925 106.95 

Box Valuation 299.43 

Little Helpers 53.98 

Total $6,961 . 72 

We realize that the Lenten Offering is reported to the 
Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Meares, and as the women do not 
handle any of the funds of the Church School Service 
League we do not include the above sums in our total. But, 
the women are interested in the work of the boys and 
girls, serving as teachers and leaders and we include 
their work in our report in order to maintain the interest. 

S'ewanee as an ideal Summer Conference for Church work- 
ers has a warm place in our affections and we are glad to 
report that William and John Washington Graham, of 
Edenton, go each year "On their own." Miss Louise Gaither 
of Hertford, also made the trip this year and has equipped 
herself by study and examinations to serve us in many 
ways. From our Central Expense Fund we assisted one 
delegate, Miss Elizabeth Bond, of Windsor. 

We desire to quote from a clergyman who has so beau- 
tifully expressed what we feel about The Mountain, as 
follows: 

"There is no way a Parish can better spend money than 
by sending two or more of its workers to Sewanee each 
year. Until a, Parish has gained something of what you 
and I know so well as the "S'ewanee Spirit" it cannot carry 
on the work of the Church as it should. It will lack in 
vision of what the Kingdom of God really is. It will lack 
enthusiasm for, as well as understanding of, religious edu- 
cation. It will be a half century behind in an apprecia- 
tion of our "young folks" and of what the Church at her 
best is trying to do for and with those aforesaid "young- 
sters." The Parish that does not get into the spirit of 
the Mountain will never be a "Club" — religious, more or 
less, but still a "Club". 

I have seen the workers in Parishes actually "made over" 
by contact with the life and teaching of Sewanee. I have 
seen Sunday Schools, the outworn, inefficient type we all 
know so well, made into real Church Schools and working 
the whole week through. I have seen teachers dry as dust 



THE MISSION HEEALD. 



and with the spiritual enthusiasm of a Victrola, developed 
by S'ewanee into Christians with a real love for the work 
and fired with a zeal to improve themselves as teachers for 
the Master so that they would give up much and burn the 
oil far into the night to attempt to master the teacher's 
art that they might better represent the Great Teacher. 

I have seen young people — careless, joy loving youngsters 
go to S'ewanee for a lark and come back just as joy loving 
but with a new outloolv on life, and the Church, and the 
relation of the Church to life. For the first time they had 
caught a glimpse of the Church in a large way. For the 
first time they had been made to see the Church as the 
power of God at work — helping and serving mankind. 

It is easy to be provincial, to have one's outlook limited 
by Parish or Diocese. It is very easy to sleep — and if you 
sleep long enough you are dead. Sometimes a Parish or 
Diocese will get provincial, sightless, sleepy, almost dead. 
But they won't quite die if just a few of their people and 
their Clergy get the Spirit of the Mountain. 

SE'WANEE CAN DO MORE THAN ANY AGENCY i 
KNOW OP TO BRING SPIRITUAL LIFE, ENTHUSIASM 
AND EFFICIENCY TO INDIVIDUAL, PARISH, OR 
DIOCEiSiE." 

Our United Thank Offering was $2,870.39. The amount 
presented at New Orleans was $7,780.31. Although this 
amount is not as large as what was presented at Portland 
in 1922, we do not feel discouraged as that offering includ- 
ed one large especial gift. Mrs. Woolvin has been most 
faithful, making many visits under rather trying circum- 
stances. She has conducted much correspondence from her 
sick room. 

The Girls' Friendly S'ociety has a new leader, Mrs. George 
Moulton, Jr., who is hoping to increase the interest in that 
branch of our work. We feel justly proud of our Holiday 
House at Wrightsville Beach and see each year many evi- 
dences of its usefulness. 

The many District or Get-together Meetings have proved 
their value. Mrs. B. T. Cox has given us much encourage- 
ment in this endeavor and we appreciate nt-r untiring ef- 
forts. Some of these districts are organized along county 
lines. Others have several counties or a county divided into 
two districts. Such meetings have been held in Ayden, 
Belhaven, Columbia, Creswell, Farmville, Paison, Green- 
ville, Plymouth, Roper, Washington and Williamston, 

The Convocation of Edenton had its usual strong fall 
meeting. The large number of clergymen present and our 
beloved Bishop made this meeting most helpful and in- 
spiring. 

The Pilgrimage in November to Old St. Thomas', Bath, 
was really inspiring, despite the disagreeable weather which 
spoiled our out-door picnic luncheon. The women will glad- 
ly cooperate as members of the newly formed association 
in the restoration of Old St. Thomas. 

In the Convocation of Wilmington the meeting at Faison 
largely took the place of a Convocation meeting, due to 
the fact that our Annual Meeting is being held here in St. 
John's where it was hoped a Convocational meeting might 
have been held. 

Our work has been advanced by personal visits from the 
officers to parish branches, by group meetings and the 
distribution of literature and the sending of many letters. 

Financially we report that all our obligations have been 
over paid for the year. Our report is as follows in the 
five fields of service. 

Parish . $10,340.41 

Community 1.246 .36 

Diocese . 4,353 . 94 

Nation 917.87 

World— Including United Thank Offering 4,914.42 
Box Work 3,020 . 11 

Total $24,795 .10 



Our first report of this kind was made in 1916. At that 
date we reported only the money paid through our treas- 
urer which was $3,000.29. But, the women spent much in 
the parishes and our financial report for 1916 might have 
been $9, ,584. 76 which we feel justified in comparing with 
the above sum reported for 1925. Our work has advanced. 

In 1917 we regretted to report that not every object for 
which we worked was paid in the amount desired. To make 
a comparison we report since 1921 our assessments have 
been paid each year, sometimes overpaid. This year our 
total amounts to over three thousand dollars increase over 
last year. 

In 191S we had only eleven parisl-.es asid missions on 
our Honor Roll while for 1925 we repot thirty -eight. 

To obtain mention on the Honor Roll a parish must 
through its one or several organizations pay the assess- 
ments, contribute to the Bishop's Fund and take part in 
some study work and hold a Prayer Service 

In 1916 we reported — 

21 Auxiliary branches with 629 Member?, 

17 Auxiliary and Parochial Societies. .2! 9 IVTembers 

26 Guilds 670 Members 

We now have — 

36 Auxiliary branches with 935 Members 

10 Auxiliary and Parochial Societies. .159 Members 
20 Guilds 577 Members 

a gain of two organizations and 153 members. 

Figures have been hard to obtain and many women may 
belong to more than one organization in a parish. But, 
with the auxiliaries working along the lines of the Na- 
tional Council and in^ the Five Fields of Service it is sig- 
nificant that we have increased those branches, and that 
membership. 

Our President and two Vice-Presidents, who are meva- 
bers of the Executive Council, have attended the meetings 
of the Council. Also a called meeting in Goldsboro in 
the interest of St, Paul's School. 

The Octave of Prayer for Unity held in May was observed 
by Ayden, Columbia, Creswell, Fayetteville, Greenville, 
Faison, Hertford, Hope Mills, Washington, Good Sliopherd 
and St. Paul's, Wilmington, and Windsor. 

1925 was a Triennial year. A Triennial of blessing, and 
privileges and responsibility. At this New Orleans Tiien- 
nial we had our full representation of five, Mrs. Jan;es 
Grist Staton, Mrs. S. P. Adams. Mrs. Swift Miller Eoat- 
wright, Mrs. William N. Tillinghast, and Mrs. William A. 
Graham. Also we had as visitors Mrs. T. C. Darst, Miss 
Carrie Myers, Miss Louise Gaither, Mrs. (iuy C. Small, 
Mrs George Rountree, Mrs. Alfred M. Waddell, Mrs. Tames 
F. Woolvin and Miss Mary Woolvin. Many helpful reso- 
lutions were passed. The most significant was the accept- 
ance of "The Message." 

Since New Orleans the time has been too short to present 
The Message to many points, but where it has been pre- 
sented it has been well received. The women of St. Mary's, 
Kinston. have accepted it. The Pitt County District has 
accepted it. 

To introduce The Message letters have been sent to every 
clergyman, every secretary of each vestry and to all wom- 
en's organizations. Thus the way has been paved to 
actively carry out The Message. 

What plans has the Convention to suggest to the women? 

Our reports show that we have met our financial 'obliga- 
tions in the past five years. Can't this fact be ased. a'ld 
perhaps our methods, to fulfill our first pledge of The Mes- 
sage? We offer our organization to do what is ac^eicfinle 
and helpful. 

We were nroud and happy to hear in New Orleans that 
just praise and high tributes given you by the women 
from many dioceses for the spiritual uplift which you gave 
us in your message at the closing service of our Triennial 
meeting. Now, as then, are we ready to say with you 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



"Realizing that only through personal dedication to Jesus 
Christ, our Lord, can we hope to bring to fruition our hu- 
man endeavors, we rededicate ourselves to the service of 
our Lord Jesus Christ, to making the strength of our deeds 
the measure of our faith; to a sincere and simple effort in 
our daily living to follow with humility the example of 
our Saviour.'" Respectfully submitted, 

FANNIE CHASE STATON, President. 
Woman's Auxiliary and Parochial Society. 



INTERESTING SKETCH OF DR. LULA M. DISOSWAY- 



BY MRS. ZENO G. LYON, OF THE WOMAN'S' AUXIL- 
IARY, ST. JAMES' CHURCH, AYDEN, N. C. 



IMPORTANT RESOLUTIONS OF THE ANNUAL CON-. 
VENTION. 



To the Parishes and Missions of the Diocese of East Caro- 
lina: 

At a meeting of the Annual Convention, held in St. 
John's Church, Wilmington, January ^Gth and 27th, the 
following resolutions were adopted: 

Resolved, That the present scale of appropriations for 
the stipends of clergy, serving Parishes or Missions within 
the Diocese, remain the same for the first six months of 
1926. 

Resolved, That at the end of the first six months the Com- 
mittee on Appropriations shall secure from the Treasurer 
of the Diocese, a statement of any deficits in payment on 
the agreed apportionments of the budget for the first six 
months, together with a statement from the Treasurers of 
all such Parishes and Missions as to their standing to 
date, in meeting their agreed share of their clerical sti- 
pends. After the receipt of such information, the Com- 
mittee on Appropriations shall notify any Parish or Mis- 
sion, showing a deficit in either obligations, that unless the 
deficit be met at the beginning of the second period, or a 
definite assurance be given by the Vestry of such Parish 
or Mission that full payment will be made of all such obli- 
gations by the end of the year, the Committee on Appropria- 
tions will be forced to lower the appropriation for such 
Parish or Mission an amount equal to the deficit for the 
first six months of the current year. 

Resolved, That the Executive Council be given discretion- 
ary powers in the application of this rule. 

Resolved, That every Parish and Mission in the Diocese 
be urged to make prompt monthly remittances of all con- 
tributions through the Red side of the envelope to the 
Treasurer of the Diocese. WALTER R. NOB, 

S'ecretary. 

Wilmington, N. C, February 18th, 1926. 



MARCIA ESTELLE DAUGHTRY. 



Whereas, we have learned with great regret and sincere 
sorrow of the death of Marcia Estelle Daughtry, which oc- 
curred in Atlanta, Feb. 16, 1926, and 

Whereas, Slie was a charter member of the W. P. Rob- 
erts Chapter of the U. D. C, of Gatesville, N .C, and we, 
her fellow-members desire to give some public expression 
to our genuine feeling of loss, to our grateful recognition 
of her services to this chapter, and to our sincere sympathy 
with her bereaved family and friends; therefore be it 

Resolved, that we deeply deplore the loss of our sister 
member, as a dear and life-long friend; that we gratefully 
acknowledge our appreciation of her connection with our 
chapter, and testify to her genuine worth and priceless ser- 
%'ices to humanity; that we extend to her bereaved family 
and friends our sympathy, genuine and heart-felt, for we 
too have known and loved her; and that a copy of these 
resolutions be spread upon the minutes of this organization; 
be sent to her immediate family, and in recognition of her 
beautiful Christian life and example be published in The 
Mission Herald. 

MRS'. T. M. RTDDICK, Chmn. 

MRS. B. R. COWPER, 

MRS. W. T. CROSS, 

MRS. E. R. ROBERTS', Committee. 



The high spot of the Convention was to me the inspiring 
address of Dr. Lula M. Disosway, who we all know is to 
be our Missionary to China. She is quite small in stature 
weighing a little over a hundred pounds, a blond with tiny 
features and doesn't look to be more than twenty-five, bub- 
bling over with enthusiasm and energy for the great work 
which lies before her. She has just recently received her 
medical degree and is at present serving as an interne 
in a hospital there in Wilmington. S'he was dressed 
in a uniform of her own designing, a plain white dress, 
made straight with a belt, and a short white coat with two 
large pockets out of one of which protruded a very profes- 
sional looking stethoscope. 

In a very vivid and interesting way she told us the story 
of her life, and why she decided to become a missionary. 
When quite a small child she was stricken with spinal 
meningitis from which she very miraculously recovered. 
As she grew older she began to wonder why God had spared 
her life, and soon the idea was formed in her mind that 
she was left here for a definite purpose — and that purpose 
was to become a missionary. This decision was met with 
anything but encouragement. Nevertheless, instead of 
weakening, these discouragements made her all the more 
firm in her determination; with this in view she finished 
high school find went away to college. One day, near the 
end of her four years, while reading the life of David Liv- 
ingston she read a statement to this effect: "A heathen's 
soul can more easily be reached through the healing of his 
body!" And right there was planted in her mind the de- 
sire to become a doctor also. As she had no money she 
appealed to the women in Bast Carolina and general church 
missions. They so wonderfully responded that she went 
to work with renewed zeal. After hard work, untold sacri- 
fices, deprivations and times when she felt like giving up 
and saying: "Oh, what's the use?" she notwithstanding 
stuck steadfastly to her purpose, last June graduated, and 
next fall she sails for China! 

Her talk was interspersed with several humorous inci- 
dents, but when she came to this fact, the seriousness of 
the great step that she is about to take there wasn't a dry 
eye in that whole gathering of women, not even Dr. Disos- 
way herself! 

When one stops to realize the great, big, unselfish sacri- 
fice that she is making one is filled with a keen sense of 
unworthiness — and one's every day cares and worries con- 
cerning material things fade into mere nothingness. Just 
think what she is giving up — mother, home, friends and 
country— (not to mention the possibility of love and per- 
haps marriage with a home of her own). Putting all these 
things, which most of us hold so dear — behind her! I am 
quite certain that our small sa'^riflces are less than nothing 
when compared to her great life of service to God and man- 
kind! She sees so vividly those little Chinese hands reach- 
ing across the sea to her and hears so clearly the call of 
God that she just can't fail them! She asked for the sun- 
porting prayers of the women back home and 'ended her 
talk with one of the most beautiful and touching nravers 
I've ever listened to! T just wish all the women of E^st 
Carolina could have been there and heard her, for T know 
it would have inspired them to make their lives count for 
things more spiritual— for more unselfish giving of them- 
selves and their means for the service of our Lord and 
Master Jesus Christ. 



One of those Christmas Club savings accounts was onened 
early last year by a woman in the diocese of Ouinf-v who, 
at Christmas time, sent the check to her rector, half for the 
parish and half for the general missionary work. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



MISS FLORENCE HUBAND WRITES TO BISHOP DARST. 



WORK OF AN BAST CAROLINA MISSIONARY IN 
ALAS'KA. 



_• St. John's-in-the-Wilderness, 

K AUakaket-Koyukuk River, Alaska, 

January 1st, 1926. 
The Rt. Rev. T. C. Darst, 510 Orange Street, Wilmington, 
N. C. 

Dear Bishop Darst: Noting the above date you might 
think I had made a "New Resolution", whereas it is only 
an old resolution put in working order. 

I was glad to have your letter and to know that things 
are going well in East Carolina. 

We have just passed through a busy time. All or the 
days and some of the nights too, have been full since be- 
fore Christmas. We have had only a few here with us all 
the fall. On account of the very small fish-catch all along 
the river this year the people had to scatter and stay out 
where they would best find food tor themselves and dogs. 
A few days before Christmas they began to come in and 
instead of the quiet village of only several families that 
we had grown accustomed to the place was full of busy 
excited people and barking dogs. Some were hauling wood, 
some were cleaning house, some trading their fur, some 
bringing in Christmas greens, but all with that air of get- 
ting ready for some special occasion. On Christmas eve 
the Church was dressed in simple holiday attire of ever- 
green arches and wreaths and the Christmas Tree put up 
in the hall. In the evening the school children, about thirty 
of them, hung up their stockings here in the Mission cabin 
and soon Santa Claus was busy. We had a short midnight 
service and then everything seemed ready tor that great 
glad day. Up early Christmas morning I think some of the 
children must have been up before us and when the beli 
rang they lost no time in making an appearance. Soon the 
village seemed to bloom forth in new apparel and gifts of 
one kind and another. 

Our Christmas Day Service was a very simple one, necea- 
sarily, but every one who possibly could seemed to take 
part in it. The offering was nearly as much as last year 
in spite of the fact that the people have had a great deal 
of. trouble and most of them have had very little to do with 
this year. 

They have all worked hard this fall and some of them 
did bring in a good catch of fur this time, but some very 
little compared to their needs. 

Our Christmas Tree was held in the afternoon of Christ- 
mas Day and native songs and dances filled the evening. 

We have had very mild weather all through the holidays. 
Football, dog-racing, shooting contests, etc., have filled the 
days and singing and dancing the nights. 

We are rejoicing in the fact of the lengthening days 
though we haven't been able to notice much difference yet, 
Tomorrow, if it is clear, we are due to see the sun again 
after its sojourn of several weeks below the horizon. 

Our monthly mail arrived this time on Christmas eve 
bringing many messages and more news of the General Con- 
vention. We were sorry to hear of Bishop Parker's sudden 
death. Miss Hill, my co-worker, whom you met with me 
once in Philadelphia, happened to be making her home in 
New Hampshire and was very devoted to the Bishop. 

There have been no travelers over the trail this winter, 
except the mail man. The aeroplane coming into Wiseman 
the gold-mining camp, a hundred miles above us, five or six 
times during the summer and fall have taken them all away. 
We cannot blame anyone for making a comfortable trip 
in three hours that would take them nearer three weeks 
over the trail with a dog-team and with no guarantee of 
comfort at all, hut have missed them passing through. Last 
winter we saw quite a few people that way. One traveler 
did come from Bettles and stopped a couple of days. He 
told us of three little girls up there who had no dolls or 



toys of any kind for Christmas because they were not to be 
bought in the store so we managed to see that each little 
girl got a doll anyway. 

This is such a rambling letter that 1 am not sure you will 
want to use it in the Mission Herald. 

With best wishes to both you and Mrs. Darst and all the 
people of East Carolina. Sincerely yours, 

FLORENCE. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT TO THE LATE FRANK' 
WOOD. 



PASSED BY THE VESTRY OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, 
EDENTON, N. C, MONDAY, FEB. 1st, 1926. . 



The vestry of Saint Paul's Church in regular meeting 
assembled, this the first day of February, 1926, deplore the 
death of Mr. Franic Wood, S'enior Warden of this church 
continuously for the past thirteen years; treasurer for 
many years and member of the vestry for more than 
thirty years. 

We hereby offer the following resolutions of respect 
to his memory: 

Be it Resolved, That Saint Paul's Church has lost a 
great leader, a faithful servant and a devout Christian. 

That the vestry as an unanimous body desires to record 
and make a part of the minutes of the Church this token 
of respect and regard. 

That the sympathy of this body be extended to the 
widow and members of the family, and that this resolution 
be published in the Mission Herald and the Edenton papers, 
that all may know with what high regard Mr. Frank Wood 
was held by his associates in Church Communion. 
Passed by the vestry this first day of February, 1926. 
R. B. DRANE, D.D., Rector 
L. F. ZIEGLER, Junior Warden 
D. M. WARREN, Secretary. 
W. S. SUMMERBLL 
RICHARD D. DIXON 
EUGENE. I. WARREN, 
ROBERT G. S'HACKELL, 

Vestry. 



FLOWERS FOR THE LIVING- 

It has been the custom for ages to wait until a person 
is dead and gone to send fiowers and eulogize him or her 
but as this life is not a path of roses, why wait? We should 
be always ready to give a word of cheer or encouragement. 
I have in mind a certain clergyman of this diocese that 
although up in age and young in his calling, is far ahead, 
in my point of view, of any clergyman that I know of. He, 
not forgetting the fact that he was once a lay-reader 
and his work in helping lay readers as he does is doing 
far more for our church than many suppose. In addi- 
tion to the work it gives the young men and the ser- 
vices rendered mission chapels is bound to bear the de- 
sired fruit for some of these lay-readers will feel the call 
and the result will be more candidates for the priesthood. 
May God's blessing rest upon that minister, who is none 
other than our beloved brother in Christ, Rev. James E. 
W. Cook known as "Jew" Cook. Keep the work up 
brother and to the others of this diocese upon the eve of 
this evangelistic movement supported by our own beloved 
bishop, may you take pattern of him and act accordingly. 
Let our Church 'Go Forward' and the diocese as a whole use 
every means to uphold the hands of those like the Rt. Rev. 
T. C. Darst and Rev. James E. W. Cook. A. T. Stj^. 



Acting under the instructions of the Executive Council, 
the Rev. W. R. Noe has been visiting a number of the 
parishes and missions of the Diocese, conferring with ves- 
tries and other groups as to the apportionments given them 
and suggesting ways and means of meeting it. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Ubc /Dbission Iberalb. 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST' CAROLINA 

Published Monthly at 

PLYMOUTH, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Subscription One Dollar A Year 

EDITORIAL STAFF: 
Editor: 
REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR. 
Contributing Editors: 
RT. RE;V. THOMAS' C. DARST, D.D. 
REV-. R. B. DRANE, D.D. 
REV. JAMES E. W. COOK, 
MRS. JAMES G. FTATON. 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

NOTICE OF ENTRY- 
Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage, pro- 
vided for in Section 1103,Act of October 3, 1917, author- 
ized November 30th, 1918. 

Subscribers changing their addresses, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Manager, giving 
when necessary, both the old and new addresses. 

Subscribers wishing to discontinue their subscriptions 
should so notify the Manager, as an absence of such nociii- 
cation is considered a continuance of the subscription. 

All articles for publication should reach the Business 
Manager by the 25th of the month. New subscriptions, 
renewals, requests for change of address and copy for ad- 
vertisements should be sent to 

REV, IHEODORE PARTRICK, JR., 

Plymouth, N. C. 

FACTS AND REMEDIES. 

S'igns are not wanting thai the two necessary factors in 
meeting the existing condition of the Church in East Caro- 
lina have been recognized. One factor is the necessity 
for facing the facts. The other is the suggestion and 
adoption of remedies. We must face the fact that a study 
of the vital statistics of the Church show that it is dan- 
gerously near a stand still. We are not having the growth 
that is essential to vital and vigorous life. Another fact 
is that the men of the Church are letting the women do 
most of the work and worshipping. The really distressing 
reduction in the number of baptisms and confirmations is 
dealt with in the report of the committee on The State 
of the Church to the annual Convention. There the facts 
are brought to light that all may i-ee and iinderstand the 
necessity for act- on. Judge Rountree, in his letter pub- 
lished In the February issue of the Mission Herald, cites 
facts as to the indifference of the laymen toward diocesan 
affairs, as judged by ilieir attendance upon the Conven- 
tion. \11 this would be discouraging indeed if it were not 
accompanied by unmistakable signs of a determination 
to remedy the situation. The enthusiastic carrying out 
of the program of evangelism will undoubtedly go far 
toward vitalizing the faith and energy of the Church peo- 
ple, and will be followed by a healthy increase in vital sta- 
tistics. The diocesan conference on rural church problems 
and opportunities should prove to be a move in the right 
direction. We give place to an article written by the Rev. J. 
N. Bynum in our editorial columns this month. He there 
makes several suggestions for creating interest in the dio- 
cesan convention. His suggestion as to the future reports 
of the committee on The State of the Church should be 
adopted. T. P., Jr. 



THE STATE OF THE CHURCH IN EAST CAROLINA. 

It is an unfortunate thing that in years past it has been 
the policy of the Convention to receive the report on the state 
of the Church in the Diocese near the close of the Conven- 
tion. This was particularly true in the case of the report to 
the last Convention. No report has been rendered in sev- 
eral years to the Convention of nfore importance, that 
gave greater pain and concern to loyal and interested 
hearts, than this one. The report showed a falling off in 
communicants in the Diocese for the year of 1925. It 
showed, that while a great stride forward has been made in 
contributions for all church work, in the last ten years, 
there has been an actual increase in numbers of only about 
five hundred fifty communicants. To realize that last year 
we actually lost in numbers makes the state of the Church 
distressing. Several at Convention were sadly touched 
by it. All deeply concerned about seeing the Church's mis- 
sion carried out in our Diocese must have been, — most of 
all, our beloved Bishop. 

Yet nothing was done about it; nothing was said about 
it. There was no time. The few that had stayed till the 
close of the Convention were thinking about getting away. 
Others, of the small number attending, had been forceu 
to go before the report was read. Can those of us who feel 
constrained to attend Convention because of our interest 
in the Church's work complacently see this most vital 
thing to the Church's mission pass each year when there 
is a remedy? 

We know that one reason why the report has come near 
the close of the Convention in recent years is — the Clergy 
have not sent their parochial reports in until the last days 
before Convention meets. This makes it impossible for the 
Committee on the state of the Church to have the report 
ready for the opening of the Convention. The Clergy 
should have this interest better at heart. 

We think another reason may be that no plan nas been 
made to get the report before the Convention at an earlier 
hour. 

Disappointment is voiced at each Convention at the small 
number of lay delegates attending and at the little part 
those attending take in discussions of the Church's work. 
We venture the prophecy that if the laymen of the Diocese 
are aroused to the distressingly disappointing growth of the 
Church in East Carolina before the next Convention, and 
are assured that the report on the state of the Church will 
be presented the first day of Convention, and that opportun- 
ity for discussion will not only be given to all interested, 
but certain strong laymen will be invited by the Bishop 
to speak upon the report, there will be a large lay dele- 
gation present and we will have a lively and inspiring con- 
vention. If this did not happen, it would seem to bespeak 
dead interest indeed. J. N. B. 



GENEROSITY INVITED. 



"■'■ The following resolution was passed at the Con- * 

'■■ vention: * 

* Resolved, that the following be printed in each * 

* issue of the Mission Herald: * 

* "In case anyone has already given his full and * 
'■■■ liberal share towards the apportionment of his Parish * 

* and yet desires to make a further contribution to- * 

* wards the diocesan or national program, the Con- * 

* vention urges that such a one should send his further * 
contribution directly to the diocesan or national * 

* treasurer respectively marked 'individual', to be * 

* credited in the former case to the Diocese but not to * 

* the Parish, and in the latter case to the national * 

* Ijrogram, but not to the Diocese." * 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



CHURCH KALENDAR— MARCH-APRIL. 



"O live ye by the Kalendar, 

And with the good ye dwell; 

The Spirit that came down on them 

Will Lighten you as well." — Bishop Coxe. 



March 21 — Fifth Sunday in Lent 

25 — Annunciation of Virgin Mary 
28— Sixth Sunday in Lent (Palm) 
2 — Good Friday 
4 — Easter Day 
11 — ^First Sunday after Easter 
18 — ^Second S'unday after Easter 



April 



(Violet) 
(White) 
(Violet) 
(Black) 
(White) 
(White) 
(White) 



Personal Items. 



The news that Miss Venetia Cox is seriously ill with 
typhoid fever in Hankow, China, has been received with 
great regret in East Carolina. Miss Cox, a most worthy 
representative of the Diocese in the mission field, is a 
native of Winterville, a daughter of Mrs. B. T. Cox. The 
prayers of many women in the Diocese are being offered 
up for her recovery. 



Her friends throughout the Diocese have heard with 
great concern of the critical illness of Mrs. John Hartley, 
wife of the Rector of St. Mary's, Kinston. Mrs. Hartley 
recently underwent a serious operation in a Kinston hos- 
pital, and is now recuperating in Asheville, where Dr. 
Hartley is with her. News of her rapid recovery will be 
received with great pleasure. 



The Rev. Henry M. Green, of Clear Spring, Md., has taken 
charge of the churches in Hertford and Gates counties, 
with residence at Winton. Mr. Green is welcomed heartily 
into the diocesan family. The field mat he is to serve 
has been vacant since the resignation of the Rev. Howard 
Alligood last fall. 



The numerous East Carolina friends of the Rev. W. J. 
Gordon, former priest of this Diocese, will hear with pleas- 
ure that the handsome new church that he has built at 
Spray, St. Luke's, is completed. A recent meeting of the 
Convocation of Charlotte was held there. 



Bishop Darst held a preaching mission in Holy Trinity 
Church, Greensboro, February 26 to March 7th, inclusive. 
Reports are to the effect that great interest was shown 
in the mission. The Rev. I. H. Hughes is Rector of this 
church. 



The Rt. Rev. C. M. Beckwith, Bishop of Alabama, con- 
ducted a preaching mission in S't. James Church, Wilming- 
ton, beginning March 14th. Bishop Beckwith is widely 
known as a teaching missioner, and his expositions of 
the Prayer Book are masterful. 



The Rev. W. H. Milton, D.D., who is a member of the 
National Council of the Church, attended a meeting of 
that body in New York the last week m February. Bishop 
Darst, who is a member of the Field Department, also 
attended. 



The Rev. W. R. Noe is scheduled to hold a mission in 
the Church of the Holy Comforter, Montgomery, Ala., be- 
ginning March 21st. The Rev. E. M. Parkman, a former 
priest of this Diocese, is Rector of this parish. 



The Ven. F. B. Drane, Archdeacon of the Yukon, who has 
been unable to fill many speaking engagements in various 
parts of the country because of illness, is recuperating at 



Southern Pines. Mr. Drane suffered an attack of pleurisy 
which kept him confined to his home in Edenton for sev- 
eral weeks. He expects to visit a number of the churches 
in East Carolina at an early date. 



Mr. Wm. H. R. Jackson, who has served the churches at 
Southport and Whiteville during his vacation, returned to 
the DuBose Training School, Monleagle, Tenn., this month. 



The Rev. George W. Lay, D.C.L,, chairman of the diocesan 
Department of Religious Education, recently attended a 
meeting of the Department of the Province of Sewanee, 
at Atlanta, Ga. 



His friends in the Diocese will regret to learn that the 
Rev. J. H. Gibboney has been forced to take a year's leave 
of absence from his parish, Epiphany Church, Richmond, 
Va., on account of ill health. Mr. Gibboney is well remem- 
bered as a former Rector of S't. Stephen's, Goldsboro, and 
editor of the Mission Plerald. We hope that he vvill fully 
recover his health. 



The Rev I Gustav H. Cautien, of Byltimore, Md., accepted 
a call to St. Mark's Colored Church, Wilmington, and is 
now in residence there. This important parish has been 
without a Rector for some time. 



The Rev. J. E. W. Cook, Rector of St. Paul's, Greenville, 
writes the Mission Herald that he feels much benefitted 
by his recent visit to a Baltimore hospital for treatment, 
and does not have to return until June 10th. Mr. Cook 
is able to carry out his Lenten schedule of services. His 
friends will rejoice in his complete restoration to health. 



SUBSCRiPTIONS PAID IN FEBRUARY 1926. 



Those paying one dollar: Mrs. F. L. Outland, J. Q. Beck- 
with, H. E. Rodgers, Miss M. D. Howey, Mrs. Norwood Giles, 
Mrs. F. C. Barber, Mrs. R. H. Bachman, Mrs. E. J. Moore, 
Mrs. F. P. S'idbury, Mrs. W. O. Moseley, A. M. McKoy, Mrs. 
M. M. S'tokes, Mrs. J. T. Killingsworth, Mrs. Sophia B. 
Duffy, J. C. Hay, Mrs. J. P. Watters, Mrs. C. A. Davis, Rev. 
John Hartley, Miss Jennie McClaud, Mrs. H. F. Wilder, 
Mrs. G. H. Roberts, Sr., Rev. H. G. England, Mrs. B. F. 
Roper, Mrs. C. D. Jacobs. Total, $34.00. 

Those paying more than one dollar: Mrs. W. A. Graham, 
$2.00; Mrs. Thomas Griffin, $2.00; Mrs. J. T. Exum, $3.00; 
G. D. Catling, $2.00; R. M. Riddick, $1.50; A. T. St. Amand, 
$3.00; Mrs. Callie Johnson, $2.00; Miss Martha Jackson, 
$2.00. Total, $17.50. 

Total for month, $41.50. 



CONFERENCE OF RURAL CLERGY ON APRIL 7. 



There is to be a conference for the Rural Clergy of 
the Diocese at Greenville on April 7th. Conference 
hours Tvfill run from 10:30 A. M. to 4:00 P. M. Dinner 
will be served by a Guild of St. Paul's Church. Speak- 
ers will be Rt. Rev. T. C. Darst, D.D. Professor S. H. 
Hobbs, Department Rural Social-Economics, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina; Rev. Bi. E. Brown, Tarboro. 
The subject of the Conference v/ill be Rural Church 
Work. While the conference is announced as being 
for the Rural Clergy of the Diocese, it is the hope 
of the Bishop and others that every Clergyman in 
the Diocese will attend. This subject affects the 
city church alike with the rural Church in the Dio- 
cese. Programs will be sent out later. J. N. B. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Diocesan News. 



WHAT THE CHURCH IS DOING IN DIOCESE OF EAST 
CAROLINA. 

The Diocese was most fortunate in having Mr. Lewis B. 
Franklin, vice-president of the National Council and na- 
tional treasurer of the Church, to conduct a number of 
conferences on the Church's Program during the week of 
March 8th. Mr. Franklin, accompanied by the Rev. W. R. 
Noe, visited a number of the larger parishes. Invitations 
were sent out to the clergy and people, of near-by churches, 
and a good attendance was secured. 



Notice has been sent out by Mrs. James G. Staton, dio- 
cesan treasurer of the United Thank Offering, calling atten- 
tion to the custom of making the Spring offering on An- 
nunciation Day, March 25th. Mrs. Staton has urged the 
clergy to have a Communion service on this day for this 
special purpose. She has begun her new duties with a 
vigorous appeal for a larger offering, and with the avowed 
purpose of enlisting the interest of every woman in the 
Diocese. 



The diocesan treasurer asks us to state that Holy Trinity, 
Hertford, and St. Mark's, Wilmington, reported in the last 
number of the Mission Herald as being in arrears on their 
apportionments for the year 1925, have since completed 
their payments. St. Stephen's, Red Springs, has paid 
$32.50 on the balance due of $41.00. 



The Service League of St. John's Parish, Wilmington, 
was host to the Leagues of the other churches of the city 
on Sunday evening, February 28th. The Rev. J. M. Taylor 
was present and made an address. The main purpose of 
the meeting was to discuss the advisability of forming a 
League Union. It was decided that this step should be 
taken at as early a date as possible. 



News has been received that Emmanuel Church, Farm- 
ville, will build a much needed rectory in the near future. 
This small parish, one of the youngest in the Diocese, is 
thoroughly alive. Its people have been working for some 
time to raise funds for the erection of a parish house, and 
already have a good sum in hand for that purpose. 



The diocesan Commission on Evangelism held a meeting 
in Wilson early in February, for the purpose of organizing 
for its work during 1926 and the adoption of a program. 
Enthusiastic accounts of the meeting have been received, 
indicating great faith in the future of the Church in East 
Carolina. Plans for enlisting all of the clergy of the Dio- 
cese as missioners are under way, and it is hoped to have 
a preaching mission in every church in the Diocese before 
the next meeting of the annual convention. 



The clergy and parish treasurers of the Diocese have been 
advised that all Pension Fund premiums and all correspon- 
dence relating to the Pension Fund are now handled through 
the office of the Executive Secretary rather than that of 
the diocesan treasurer. This change was made at the 
annual convention, at the request of Mr. Meares and the 
recommendation of the Finance Committee. 



Mrs. H. J. MacMillan, the new president of the Woman's 
Auxiliary and Parochial Societies, of the diocese of East 
Carolina, has sent out a letter to the clergy, urging a 
thorough organization in each parish and mission and 
asking for their co-operation. Mrs. MacMillan has entered 
vigorously upon the duties of her office. 



The Rev. James E. W. Cook, Rector of St. Paul's, Green- 
ville, has given ua a good example of the helpful part that 
publicity can play In advancing the cause of the Church. 



At the beginning of Lent Mr. Cook contributed a two-column 
editorial to the daily paper of Greenville, on the observance 
of Lent. It was most readable, and doubtless gave the read- 
ers of the paper a new conception of the season and Its 
meaning. 

FURTHER CONTRIBUTIONS TO ST. THOMAS, BATH, 
INVITED. 

The response to the notices of membership dues in St. 
Thomas' Association have been quite gratifying. Something 
like 65 per cent responded by sending either a one dollar 
bill or a check for that amount. No doubt we will hear 
from the other 35 per cent when they come across the no- 
tice that was misplaced. We hope to undertake to repair 
the roof of the Church as soon as sufficient funds are in 
hand and the weather opens up. We assure tardy members 
of the Association no offense will be taken should they find 
pleasure in remitting one dollar to the Treasurer, Rev. 
J. N. Bynum, Belhaven, N. C. Friends interested in the 
old Church are perfectly welcome to contribute any sum 
they desire for the restoration of the building even though 
they have not yet joined the Association. J. N. B. 



IN PRAISE OF MR. MADARA'S WORK. 



Rev. Guy H. Madara has resigned the rectorship of St. 
Peter's Church, Mountain Lakes, to accept a call to Christ 
Church, New Bern, North Carolina. 

During the four years of his service in the Diocese as 
Canon Missioner, Mr. Madara has carried on the work of 
this department with great devotion and zeal. He has 
never spared himself, traveling many thousands of miles 
from place to place in the Diocese, and working early and 
late in helping up with office duties. As Executive Secre- 
tary of the Department of Development and Revenue of 
the Diocese, he has fostered the work of missionary edu- 
cation, organizing and systematizing the efforts of the mem- 
bers of this great department, and pressing home upon the 
minds of the people in the parishes the immense import- 
ance of a good system and the thorough carrying out of 
details. 

Two years ago, when the new Parish of Mountain Lakes 
was organized. Canon Madara became its first Rector, giving 
thereafter half of his time to the missionary work in the 
Diocese. He now goes into a parish with long traditions 
and great missionary zeal and responsibilities. 

He has made hosts of friends in the diocese of Newark, 
both among the clergy and lay people. They will miss his 
cheerful spirit and excellent exhortations to promptness 
and fidelity in the work of the Church, and they will follow 
him to his new field of labor with the heartiest good wishes 
and earnest prayers for his prosperity and blessings in all 
good ways. (Newark Churchman.) 



MRS. WALLACE SUTTON. 

Fell asleep in Jesus on March 18th, 1926, Mrs. Wallace 
Sutton (nee Annie Gregg), at Fayetteville, North Carolina. 
The Woman's Auxiliary of St. John's Church feels a deep 
personal loss in the passing of this devoted member, an 
untiring worker in every activity where she could be used 
and who gave of herself freely in the service of the Master. 
Her sweet and sincere personality had endeared her to 
every member of the Auxiliary and she will be missed 
greatly in the Parish life. The sympathy of the women 
of St. John's Church is extended to the bereaved husband 
and children who mourn the loss of this devoted mother. 

Annie Gregg Sutton has now passed into that Home be- 
yond the grave. "May light perpetual shine on her." 
"Her day is come not gone. 
Her sun is risen, not set. 
Her life is now beyond 
The reach of death and change, 
Not ended — but begun." 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



11 



EXCHANGE OF POETIC SENTIMENT- 



The Rector's Aid Society of St. Peter's, Washington, 
ordered a cassock as a Christmas present for Mr. Gardner. 
Its failure to arrive on time brought forth the following 
poetio effusions: 

YOUR GIFT. 
"Merry Christmas, Mr. Gardner" 

How do you do, 
The Rector's Aid Society 

Send greetings to you. 
We ordered your Christmas present 

From London Town. 
A black silk Cassock 

It's a wonderful gown. 
But you know old Santa, 
Dear Jolly elf. 
He left your Christmas package 

On a London shelf. 
We are all very sorry 

Tho it's now on the way, 
But it won't be delivered. 

By Christmas Day. 
S'o Happy Christmas, Mr. Gardner 

How do you do! 
The Rectors Aid Society 
Send their love to you. 



— Church Poet. 



MY THANKS. 



Many Thanks! Rectors Aid, 

How do you do! 
The Reverend Stephen Gardner 

Sends many thanks to you. 
I received the Christmas present 

From London Town. 
A Black Silk Cassock 

It's a wonderful gown. 
I know that old Santa, 

Dear Jolly elf, 
Left that Christmas package 

On a London Shelf. 
But I am very thankful 

That it has found its way. 
Even tho' it was not delivered 

By Christmas Day. 
So many thanks! My friends. 

How do you do! 
The Rector of St. Peter's 

Sends His Love to you. 



— S G. 



MISS BOYER'S INSTITUTE AT FAYETTEVILLE TO BE 
INTERESTING EVENT. 



Announcement in the February issue of the Mission 
Herald that Miss Laura F. Boyer is to conduct an Educa- 
tional Institute in St. John's Church, Fayetteville, May 3, 
4 and 5, has aroused a great deal of interest in East Caro- 
lina. 

The Institute will begin on Monday night. May 3rd, with 
an attractive speaker on the program. After the service, 
the delegates will register so that classes on Tuesday will 
be uninterrupted. The classes will close early Wednesday 
morning. ^ -' ^'m 

The women of East Carolina are offered a splendid op- 
portunity to learn much about the work that the Church 
is doing, and are fortunate in securing Miss Boyer as the 
leader of this Institute. It is hoped that many leaders 
for discussion groups and other educational work will be 
trained at this time. 

The women of iSt. John's, Fayetteville, are looking forward 



to having a woman from each parish in the Diocese present 
on May 3rd. The parishes are asked to send in the names 
of their delegates to the Woman's Auxiliary of St. John 
Fayetteville, as soon as possible. 

The April number of the Mission Herald will carry the 
full program of the Institute. 



NEWS OF PLYMOUTH AND ROPER. 



INTERESTING STUDY CLASS-BS DURING LENT. 



The Lenten services at Grace Church, Plymouth, and St. 
Luke's, Roper, follow the same schedule of past years. Ser- 
vices are held every afternoon except Wednesday in Grace 
Church, and on Friday night. A Wednesday night service 
is given to Roper. 

. The women of Grace and S't. Luke's are having interest- 
ing discussion groups during Lent. At St. Luke's the leader 
is Miss Augusta Carstarphen. At Grace Church the women 
are studying Miss Boyer's "Search for Peace" this year. 
At a preliminary meeting a very interesting address was 
delivered on Peace by Mrs. Guy C. Small, of Washington. 
The men of Grace Church are meeting weekly at the Rec- 
tor's study for a study class. 

At a recent meeting of St. Luke's vestry it was decided 
to fall in with the suggestion made at the annual Conven- 
tion that men's clubs be organized in the parishes. After 
Lent it will be formed there, and it is planned to have 
n;onthly meetings for the study and discussion of the 
Church's work. 

The women of Grace Church were given one talent e^ch. 
consisting of .50 cents, some time after the first of the 
year. On Shrove Tuesday they met at the home of Mrs. 
W. R. Hamrtton and discovered that thev had made over 
$200.00. This was given to the Rectory Fund. 



INTERESTING ITEMS FROM VARIOUS SOURCES. 



The future of America denends upon how our bovs nnd 
girls are trained today and not on how we were trained 
when we were children. — Parish paper. 

The manager of the Copley Theatre. Boston, has loined 
the number of managers who decree that no trained ani- 
mal acts shall take place in their theatres. 

In the S'l^anish translation for the Bishons' Pin^tornl T^et- 
ter. in the Mexico diocesan paner. "stewardship" becomes 
"tacto administrative," administrative tact! 

Not the least valuable of the varied foreign-Iartaruns-p pub- 
lications of the S. P. C. K. in the past year is the TTa:^nda 
Cookery Book, for mission housewives confronted with na- 
tive African servants as cooks. 

Under the general title of "Neighbors New and Old," St. 
Paul's Chapel, New York, has had a series of about twenty 
addresses at noon-day services telling about what the Epis- 
copal Church is doing "among the foreign-born and other 
misunderstood neighbors." 

The McNulties in S'oochow are much pleased with a 
Chinese New Year's card they received from Chinese 
friends, issued by an "anti-Christian" movement, which 
enumerated eight dreadful evils due to Christianity and 
ended by wishing a happy new year. 

A layman in the diocese of Atlanta has recently taken 
out three insurance policies. One is in favor of the Do- 
mestic and Foreign Missionary Society, which is the legal 
designation of the Church's general missionary work, one 
in favor of the diocese, and one In favor of the layman's 
parish. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALE>. 



TEACHER TRAINiNG IN RELlGiOUS EDUCATION. 



DR. LAY CALLS ATTENTION TO THIS PHASE OF 
SUMMER SCHOOL WORK. 



In the earlier efforts to learn about our Church Work 
the Summer Schools and Conferences of various kinds gave 
rather general courses in Missions, Social Service and Re- 
ligious Education, and everyone heard all that was given 
on all of the subjects. This was a good beginning and 
created a general interest. 

The next development was to encourage specializing in 
one of these three departments. This secured more definite 
knc\\ ledge and some rather definite training In that one 
department. 

In the Department of Religious Education the next step 
has been to offer definite instruction in various subdivisions 
of the subject Avhich has finally been worked out to include 
a curriculum, with required and elective courses, covering 
a. specified number of hours and leading on to Credits and 
a Diploma. The plan is fully explained in the Leaflet 
(F-719) "How Membership in;, the National Accredited 
Teachers' Association (N. A. T. A.) and a National Diploma 
may be obtained." 

We all realize the need of Trained Teachers to take the 
place of those who have no other qualifications except their 
willingness to 'Take a class.' This requires very careful 
special study. We should all try to get as many as possible 
to take these definite Courses and to obtain membership 
at least in the N. A. T. A. by qualifying for Credit in the 
Third (lowest) Class. "How to enroll," (P-719) on page 
one gives the various methods. As many as possible should 
attend a two-weeks summer school, but much can be done 
locally by the Rector or some other qualified instructor. 
For "The Teacher" and "The Pupil" a Public School 
Teacher would often be best. 

There are many good S'ummer Schools. Please keep 
specially in mind the Sewanee Summer School, designed 
for all the Southern Dioceses, and the Valle Crucis Summer 
School, designed for the Carolinas. The latter is easily 
accessible by a good road from Asheville. 

Attendance at either of these schools for one session 
would secure full credit for two ten-hour courses. The in- 
structors at both are highly qualified. 

The Curriculum consists of three classes (Beginning 
with the Third), in each Class four Courses must be taken, 
and each Course requires ten hours of class-work. Credit 
is given for each ten-hour course, v/hen completed, a certifi- 
ficate for each Class (Membership in the N. A. T. A. being 
obtained by qualifying for the lowest, or Third Class) and 
a full Diploma for completion of all the Classes. Eriefiy, 
ten hours for a Course, forty hours for a Class and 120 
hours for the Diploma. 

All four courses for the Third Class are definitely pre- 
scribed. They are fundamental and every teacher should 
take them. They are as follows: 

THIRD CLASS. 

1. The Teacher (Method) Weigle, Unit II, Morehouse 
Pub. Co., 35 cents. 

2. The Pupil (Method) Unit I, Morehouse Pub. Co., 35 
cents. 

3. The Bible (Content), Our Bible, Christian Nurture, 
Morehouse Publishing Co., $1.10. 

4 . The Prayer Book, (Content) Everyman's History of 
the Prayer Book, Dearmer, Morehouse Pub. Co., $1.10. 

The text books for the "Method" courses are prescribed 
by the National Department, those for the "Content" courses 
may be prescribed by the Diocesan Department. The above 
texts are recommended, but have not been formally author- 
ized. The Vice-Chairmau would feel justified in accepting 
any reasonably good book for the present. The ability 



of the Instructor is of far more importance than the con- 
tents of the book. 

Leaflet F. 719 and a leaflet giving a full description of 
all the "Courses for Credit" in the N.A.T.A., with text- 
books recommended, may be obtained from "Dept of Rel. 
Education," 281 Fourth Ave., New York City. 

Special attention is called to the "Note" towards the top 
of page 2, (F-719). By its provision many of our Clergy 
and teachers could at once obtain credit for one or more 
courses in Class Three. 

At present the Diocese of East Carolina has no mem- 
ber in the N.A.T.A. Let us try to secure many such in the 
near future by getting Credit in the four Courses of Class 
Three. 

, GEORGE W. LAY, Vice-Chairman 
Dept. of Religious Education, 

Diocese of East Carolina. 



THE UNITED THANK OFFERING IN EAST CAROLINA. 



At the 1925 Triennial Presentation Service in New Or- 
leans the East Carolina women gave $7,780.31. 

What shall we .give at Washington in October 1928? 

To make the United Thank Offering known and loved 
you should have the following: 

liittle Blue Boxes — one in the hands of every woman. 

The Spirit of Missions — One Dollar a year. 

Leaflets: 
W. A. No. 100 U.T.O. Resolution and Prayer Card. 

per hundred $ .60 

W. A., No. 101 The Gift of a Thankful Heart, per 

hundred 1 . 00 

W. A. No. 106 1889-1928 a Record and a Hope, per 

hundred 2.00 

W. A. No. 112 That All May Give Thanks, per hun. 1 . 50 
W. A. No. 114 The United Thank Offering, per hun. 1.50 
W. A. No. 116 S'piritual Value of the U. T. O., per 

hundred 1 .00 

W, A. No, 117 U. T. O. Catechism, per hundred 1.00 

W. A. No. 121 Prayer for Auxiliary and U. T. O. 

card, per hundred .60 

W. A. No. 20 Auxiliary Handbook of 1923, each .20 

Minutes of Business Meeting at New Orleans, each .10 

Observation Trips at 25 cents a copy is a good U. T. O. 
program. 

The above may be ordered direct from: The Book Store 
Church Mission House, 281 Fourth Avenue, New York City. 

If you order from the Book Store send a check or money 
order with your order. 

Slmall packages will be sent free upon request from: 
Mrs. James Grist Staton, 301 West Main Street, William- 
ston, North Carolina. 

To make the United Thank Offering known and under- 
stood have a pageant. "In and Out of the Little Blue Box" 
is easy to give. Copies may be obtained from Mrs. Staton. 



FRANK WOOD— AN APPRECIATION. 



Died at Edenton, N. C, January 26th, 1926, 
FRANK WOOD 
son of Edward and Caroline M. Gilliam Wood. 

Born at Edenton on the 7th of June, 1858, his life was 
that of the typical gentleman of these parts, public-spirited, 
unselfishly occupied with the affairs of town, county, and 
State, through which the ideals of Holy Church had -influ- 
ence. He was a trusted official and a respected adviser 
in all those relations. 

As personal friend. Senior Warden and Treasurer of St. 
Paul's Parish, legislator of the Diocese and of the Na- 
tional Church he was most amiable and helpful. 

He now rests from his labors, and his works do follow 
him. We bless his memory, and we thank God for his 
good example. D. 



THE MISSION HEKALD. 



13 



TROMPSON ORPHANAGE AND TRAINING INSTITU- 
TION, CHARLOTTE, N. 0. 



FEBRUARY AT THE ORPHANAGE. 



One of the most interesting events of the past month was 
the visit of Arclideacon Hardin for the purpose of confer- 
ring certificates upon a class of twenty-two children who 
have made a perfect recitation of the Church catechi>n:. 
The Archdeacon made an address to the children in the 
little Chapel of St. Mary the Virg'u \>, lueh will loa.ic be 
remembered, and at the close of the service shook hands 
with each one of them with a kind personal word, which 
greatly pleased the boys and girls. 

Through the kindness of Mrs. Lewis Burwell and others, 
the older children were enabled to hear the Sewanee Glee 
Club at the Central High School, which they enjoyed im- 
mensely. 

St. Valentine's Day was a very happy day for the chil- 
dren, every child on the place being remembered with 
lovely valentines, sent by loving friends in Rocky Mount 
and Wilmington and other places. 

On February fifteenth the Superintendent and Mrs. 
Wheeler journeyed to Winston-S'alem to tell of the work of 
the Orphanage to the splendid Church Service League cf 
St. Paul's Pai'ish. St. Paul's has wonderfully supported 
the work of the Orphanage and it was a great pleasure to 
express the grateful appreciation of the children and che 
management for the numerous contributions which have 
been made by St. Paul's. 

On February 15th Mrs. Laura K. Poague came to substi 
tute as matron at Kenan Cottage for Miss Lou H'. Hill, 
who is spending her month's vacation in Asheville at the 
home of her brother. 

Drs. Hunter and Houser conducted an operation for ton- 
sils and adenoids at the Orphanage infirmary on February 
18th, successfully caring for three of the children, two boys 
and one girl. All three have recovered and will undoubt- 
edly be much better as a result of this necessary opera- 
tion. 

This Lent a very determined effort is being made by the 
children to try and double the goal which has been as- 
signed to them for their Lenten mite box offering. Prac- 
tically every copy of "The Spirit of Missions" ordered for 
the purpose has been sold, and the children are exercising 
some real self-denial with this end in view. 

Friday evening Lenten services are being conducted by 
the older boys of the Young People's Fellowship which are 
proving of real help in the devotional life of the children 
during Lent. 

Mrs. Lewis Burwell and her Sunday School class in- 
vited ten little girls from the Orphanage to meet at her 
home one afternoon after school to get acquainted and 
have a little social time together. Mrs. Burwell's thought- 
fulness was much appreciated by the children and gives 
another helpful contact with children on the outside. 

The announcement of Rev. Mr. Rogers' resignation at 
St. Peter's Church to accept the rectorship of Trinity 
Church, Asheville, has been received with much sorrow 
by the children, to vfhoxn Mr. Rogers has been a warm 
friend and by whose efforts through parish Service League 
and Sunday School so raany splendid contributions have 
been made to the children's happiness and well being. It 
is a comfort to know that as rector of Trinity Church he 
will still be deeply interested in the work of the Thompson 
Orphanage. The prayers and best wishes of the children 
follow him and his family. 

Contributions from the Diocese of East Carolina from 
January 23 to Feruary 25. 

CAS'H. 

Beaufort, St. Paul's $2.30 

Payetteville, St. John's 136.50 

Wilmington, St. James ..436.90 



Edenton, St. Paul's 25.00 

Vv'ashington, St. Peter's 108.74 

Windsor, S't. Thomas' S. S 2 . 97 

Merry Hill — Emily, Richard and Whitmell Smithwick 1.00 
Callowhee, St. David's 5.00 

CONTRIBUTIONS IN KIND. 

Washington, Miss Lena Windley — 1 box oranges. 

Wilmington, H. C. McQueen— 8 copies "The Youth's 
Companion." 

Wilmington, Division 4, St. James' C. S. S'. L. — Box of 
valentines. 

Belhaven, Mrs. B. F. Stearn — 1 pair rubber boots, coat 
and Indian suit. 

Edenton, Mrs. Charles Stunage — 1 coat. 

Fayetteville, Mrs. R. W. Herring — 1 package boy's cloth- 
ing. 



MR. MEARES RECEIVES "CONSCIENCE MONEY. 



IMr. T. D. Meares, Treasurer, Wilmington, N. C. 

Dear Mr. Meares: I made a visit recently to an old friend 
of my family. During the course of the visit this friend 
informed me that a visit by me was requested that a debt 
of long standing might be paid. "Fifty-six years ago," I 
was told, "I bought a hat from your grandfather which 
cost nine dollars. I recalled a few months ago that for 
seme reason that account was never paid. Here is a fifty 
dollar bill to pay the account with interest. I want you to 
take it and send to each of your grandfather's heirs his or 
her share." I M'as naturally surprised and amused. Sur- 
prised because it was something unthought of. Amused 
because it was so unusual. I immediately began to try to 
locate, in mind, grandft.ther's heirs. I wanted them to know 
of the honesty and righteousness in the heart of this friend 
as well as to have the small sum which should be the share 
of each. I at once saw all of them could not be found. 
The effort to get in touch with the heirs would entail 
several dollars in postage. When located the share of each 
would be in the neighborhood of 50 or 60 cents. Our friend 
did not want the heirs, or others, to know the debt was 
being settled. In view of this the small sum each would 
receive would not justify the expense and effort if the 
heirs could have the satisfaction of knowing who did it. I 
suggested that the fifty dollars be given for benevolence. 
The suggestion was accepted and I was requested to give or 
send the sum to the Thompson Orphanage. 

I have told this story because of the moral and interest 
it contains. My check for fifty dollars enclosed. 
Faithfully and sincerely, 

J. N. BYNUM. 



"A MEMORIAL." 



On the fifth day of January, 1926, Mrs. Desdia Eborn 
died at the home of her bi'other Mr. W. B. Smith in Florida, 
where she had gone to make her home. 

We, the ladies of Christ Church Auxiliary, Creswell, N. 
C, find it sad to bear the great loss of one whose life has 
been such an inspiration down through the eighty-eight 
years that she has lived among us. We feel that a friend 
has gone from among us. The ready sympathy, wise coun- 
sel, and never failing encouragement which she radiated 
will stand in our hearts as an emblem of all that was fine 
and Christ-like. 

She was a communicant of this parish for over fifty years, 
and though we will meet her no more in the Church she 
loved so well, we shall continue to live near her in the spirit 
of Christ which was so beautifully exemplified in her daily 
living. 



14 



THE MISSION HERAU). 



Young People's Department. 

Rev. J. M. Taylor, Secretary for the Young People's Work. 
Miss Elizabeth Moore, Editor of Department. 



Great regret is felt throughout the entire Diocese over 
t.iv: ue.ioion of the Rev. J. M. Taylor to accept a call to 
iViiauii, Fla. Mr. Taylor has served very acceptably for 
nine months as Executive Secretary for Young People's 
y</oni in East Carolina. Our best wishes follow him in 
his new field. 



STATEMENT FROM MR. TAYLOR. 
To the Young People of East Carolina: 

I am certainly sorry to leave you, but it seems necessary 
and I must go. I want to say that I have thoroughly en- 
joyed working with you. I shall always be keenly inter- 
ested in you and your great work. It is truly a great work 
that you young people are doing, but you are equal to its 
task, and I know that you will do well. 

I wish that it could be possible at this time to say good- 
bye to each of you with a warm handclasp but it is not, 
so I must use the next best way that 1 know to say "Good- 
bye and God bless" every one of you whom I prize so highly 
as true friends. Yours very truly, 

J. M TAYLOR. 



A STATEMENT FROM MISS' GAITHER, THE TREAS- 
URER. 

The Y. P. S'. L. of the Diocese regrets so much to have 
Mr. Taylor leave us, after serving us so faithfully as Execu- 
tive Secretary, since June During this time we have had 
no funds for his salary. Checks, covering the assessment 
of various service Leagues, which have been sent to me re- 
cently, amount to $99.50, which is not quite one-fifth of our 
pledge. 

Mr. Taylor's leaving our Diocese does not mean that we 
do not have to pay our five hundred dollars, but his going 
without having been paid makes it more urgent, that all 
assessments be paid in full as soon as possible. 

Trusting that I will receive the balance due in the near 
future, I am Faithfully yours, 

LOUISE J. GAITHER, Treasurer. 



ROLL OF HONOR. 

Y. P. S. L. overpaid their assessment. 

Holy Innocents, Seven Springs. 

Y. P. S'. L. paid assessment. St. John's, Fayetteville; 
St. Philip's, Fayetteville; Einmanuel, Farmville; St. James, 
Ayden, Avoca, Roper, Woodville. 

Y. P. S. L. paid part of assessment: St. Paul's, Edenton; 
Grace, Plymouth. 



POINTS FOR THE, Y. P. S. L. SHIELD. 
Points. 

1. 25. Full Attendance. 

2. 20. Special Service. 

3. 10. Corporate Communion. 

4. 10. 5. Number of Persons Brought to Baptism. 

5. Number of Persons Brought to Confirmation. 

5. 10. Number of Persons Brought to Sunday School. 

(Church School.) 

6. 10. New members brought to Y. P. S. L. 

7. 10. Conduction of the Service. 

8. 5. Prepared Programs. 



A PRAYER FOR THE BISHOP. 

O Heavenly Father, guide and bless our Bishop in the 

great work that he is to do. Keep him ever Physically, 

Mentally, and Spiritually equal to his task. Bless all those 

who minister in our Diocese, and the Christian Church. 



Be with them in seeking the lost, and tending those who 
have been brought home to Thy fold. And, Lord, grant 
that we too may have our share in helping in Thy work. 
All this we ask in the name of Thy son. The Great S'hepherd 
of the lost. AMEN. 



ACTIVITIES OF ST. PETER'S SERVICE LEAGUE, 
WASHINGTON, N. C. 

The Young People's Service League of our Parish, which 
was organized nearly three years ago has accomplished 
much, and during the past three months we have done a 
great many things, namely: the purchase of a piano with 
some contributions given by different organizations of the 
Church. At Christmas time we played Santa Clans with 
great success, for some of the unfortunate children of the 
city. At the present we are practicing for a play, "Always 
in Trouble," which we hope to present to the public imme- 
diately after Easter. We have scheduled, a basketball game 
between the Christian Endeavor and the Service League, 
which we hope to play one day in early March, the date 
at the present is uncertain. We aided the ladies of the 
Church in serving a supper to the men of our Parish. Our 
Service League furnishes quite a number of the members 
of the Junior Choir; and at each of our meetings we pro- 
nounce a prayer, which we dedicated to our Bishop, and 
we wish him every success in his new work. 

We are looking forward with great enthusiasm to the 
coming Conference, which is to be held with us at the 
opening of summer. 

With the above visions in sight, our organization of 
young boys and girls expect to accomplish even more in 
the future. 



YOUNG PEOPLE OF HOLY INNOCENTS RESOLVE TO 
DO MUCH. 

The Y. P. S. L. of the Holy Innocents' Parish had their 
usual meeting Saturday night before the third Sunday. 
V/e had a very interesting andi beneficial meeting, at 
which time the League voted unanimously to double the 
number of children that it would be responsible for next 
Christmas. Last Christmas our League sent a box contain- 
ing gifts, both useful and entertaining, for seven children. 
The actual cost of the box was $18.00. Next Christmas 
we will support 14 children. 

Our Y. P. S. L. decided to meet every week during Lent 
and study several books, among them "The Church at 
Work." 

We were all very happy indeed to have two of our Y. P. 
S. L. boys, John William Hardy and Gerard Hardy, help 
our Rector, Mr. G. F. Cameron in the services last 3rd 
Sunday morning and evening. Two other League boys 
have volunteered to help in the next Service, Ambrose 
Pickett and Lehman Barwick. 

Our Y. P. S. L. gave a Valentine party at which we sold 
pies which were given by the girls in the League and 
their friends. We sold ice cream, home made candy, had 
a "grab bag" and did a number of things to make money. 
The pies were sold at auction. Everybody thoroughly en- 
joyed the evening and the League cleared about $37.00. 
We used $16.00 of this money for Mr. Taylor's salary, our 
League being assessed $10.00. 

We have very recently put quite a number of new mission 
Hymnals in the Church. 

We were all delighted to have Mr. Taylor, of New Bern, 
with us at a meeting in January. We are trying hard 
to follow his many good suggestions. We hope he will 
come again very soon. 



A Chinese woman is editor of a daily Chinese paper pub- 
lished in Havana. She is a graduate of the University of 
Peking, and became a Christian while she was a school 
girl. She recently addressed the Auxiliary of Holy Trinity 
Cathedral, Havana. 



THE MISSION HEKALD. 



35 



NATIONAL COUNCIL ISSUES STATEMENT TO THE 

CHURCH. 



Convocation of Colored Church Woikers 



The National Council at its meeting on February 24 
and 25, issued the following statement to the Church: 
TO THE CHURCH. 

The amount of income for the Budget of the General 
Church promised by the dioceses for 1926 totals $3,074,502. 
This amount is $574,945 larger than the total given by the 
dioceses last year and is $46,984 larger than the highest 
amount ever received from the dioceses which was in 1920, 
the first year of the Nation-Wide Compaign. It is with the 
deepest gratification that the National Council announces 
this record-breaking advance. 

At the special meeting of the Council in January the 
total amount reported by the dioceses was $2,818,507 (ex- 
clusive of miscellaneous gifts). The supplementary efforts 
of the dioceses, in response to the appeal of the Council, 
resulted in additional promises of $225,995. Out of 97 
dioceses and districts to which budget quotas are allotted 
59 reported 100 per cent for 1926 as against 52 in 1925. 

The Council hopes that this splendid advance will ob- 
viate the necessity of closing any schools, hospitals or 
churches. Nevertheless the total expected income for 1926 
from all sources is $360,498 less than the amount needed to 
execute the Budget. The Council has therefore been oblig- 
ed to cut the appropriations in accordance with instruc- 
tions of the General Convention. 

Making a reasonable allowance for lapsed balances, 
which are unexpended portions of appropriations, the Coun- 
cil has been obliged to curtail the work in the amount of 
$200,440. The first reductions were in the work at the 
Church Missions House in the sum of $34,250. 

The next .group to suffer consisted of certain nqfional 
Church organizations, four of the Church Colleges, and the 
American Church Institute for Negroes, with a total cut of 
$55,125. 

The reduction of appropriations to the dioceses receiving 
aid from the National Council was on a flat 10 per cent 
basis, amounting to 23,213. The appropriations for the 
fcalaries of women workers provided from the United Thank 
Offering were excepted from the cut. 

The foreign-born American work was cut $6,000. 

The reductions in appropriations to the Continental Do- 
mestic Missionary Districts were centered in institutional 
work in Arizona, Idaho, Utah and Wyoming to the extent 
of $30,435 and in the items for upkeep, taxes, insurance and 
repairs in all districts, for a total of $18,500. It is ex- 
pected that this latter amount will be provided by the mis- 
sion congregations served. 

It was manifestly impossible to make specific reductions 
in the extra-continental and foreign fields without having 
the Bishops present. The Council therefore voted a flat 
2 per cent reduction, amounting to $32,917, in these budgets, 
notifying each Bishop to report promptly in what items 
the cuts would take place. 

The Council commends this situation to the consideration 
and prayers of the Church and assures the Dioceses that 
any further supplementary pledges to improve the situation 
will gladly be received at any time in order that work 
which has been perforce curtailed may be restored to its 
place in the budget appropriations and the hardships inci- 
dent to the reductions relieved. 

THE NATIONAL COUNCIL. 



-IN- 



r 



The Hotel Goldsboro 

Modern— Fire Proof. GOLDSBORO, N. C. 

VANSTORY Inc., LE=iRFF 



The Diocese of East Carolina. 



THE REV. J. W. HERRITAGE, D.D. 
THE REV. J. B. BROWN, Secretary. 
THE REV. R. I. JOHNSON. Editor. 



This Department is languishing for news. We cannot 
get from the brethren accounts of their fields. Please send 
us each month some account of happenings in your field. 
Interesting items recording the success of your various 
activities. Your ideas will help some one who is struggling 
with your problems in his own field. 

Two months of the new year have passed. We s'^ould 
be striving to maintain our monthly average of payments 
on our apportionments if we are to make the required 
showing at the end of the first half of 1926. If we can do 
this much anxiety and labor will be saved at the end of the 
year which seems to be a difficult time to raise balances. 

USUAL LENTEN SERVICES AT ST. CYPRIANS' 

The early service of meditation and prayer at St. Cyprians 
Church is again going at full strength Vv^ith much interest 
on the part of Christians of every name in the community. 
This service is held for half an hour each morning at 
6:15 and is attended by many people on their way to work 
besides m^ny others who come for the love of the "ervl^e 
at this hour. The service is held every morning in Lent 
until Easter and consists of hymns, S'cripture, prayers and 
brief meditation varied with the Litany on Wednesdays 
nnd Fridays and a Daily Celebration at 6:15 during Holy 
Week until Good Friday. 

The Cantata "Joy After Sorrow" will be rendered at 
Day Break on Easter Day this year as has been the custom 
for seven years. Many people are frequently turned away 
from this service. For the benefit of those who do not wit- 
ness the first rendition, the Cantata is usually repeated 
two weeks later at the Evening Service at which time 
many white friends come to hear our choir which is usually 
at its best for this service. 



BRIEF NOTES OF INTEREST. 



J. C. VANSTORY 
President 



J. C. WILLIAMS, 
Vice-Pres. & Treas. 



Chaplain Swan, in New York City, was concerned about 
a transport going out recently with eight hundred men, 
for a long voyage, and practically nothing to read. Just 
in time to catch the boat a box from a Church Periodical 
Club donor arrived with eight hundred books and maga- 
zines. ' ' ~n 

Twice during the past year the son of a Japanese priest 
has been ordained deacon, in the Diocese of Kobe. The 
En,glish missionary writes that it is pleasing to see the 
young men come forward, especially from homes where 
experience has taught them that they are not "bettering" 
themselves from a worldly point of view. 

Shantung, Burma, the Argentine. South Africa, Calgary 
and Delhi are the scenes of events related in The Mission 
Field (S P. G.) for February. Everywhere more workers 
are needed. 

"I think all clergy ought to have a little business train- 
ing," the newspapers quote Bishop Murray as saying, "but 
I don't think it is half as important as that all business 
men should have religious training." 

Eight thousand conies of the S'crintures i-ecently nub- 
'^hrised from the Chinese ageni^y of the ,\mprican Pi'i^le 
Society by Genernl Ch'ing. one of Feng's leading officers, 
for distribution in his army. 



16 



THE MTSSI017 HERALD. 



=5r=T^ 



-.%,-. w ^ ^^ w . 



OWN A SUMMER HOME at CAROLINA BEACH 

Carolina Beach is on the Main Land. A Beach that you can drive your Automobile to the Water's edge, 
A good hard road from Wilmington. A new modern hotel now under construction that will be completed 
for the season of 1926. Lots are sold on reasonable terms and as an investment they are ideal. Informa- 
tion gladly given. Call or write any authorized representative. 

CAROLIXA BEACH CORPORATION 

OWNERS AA^D DEVELOPERS OF 

CAROLINA BEACH 



Offices at CAROLINA. BEACH, N. C. 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WIA^STON- SALEM- N. C. 

OFFICERS:— S. C. Ogburn, President; W. F. Schaffner, Vice-President; W. W. Walsh, Vice-President; 

E, P. Yates, Vice-Presideat; E. D. Turner, F'ecretary-Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS: S. C. Ogburn, S. C. Clark, A. V. Na.sh, W. F. Shaffner, E. P. Yates, E. D. Turner,W. W. Walsh 
J. L. BECTON, C. E., Wilmington, N. C. Engineer in charge of development. 
REFERENCES: Any Bank or Mercantile Agency. 



i 



pp^- 



:T>»r--"V_.V- 



Norfolk=Sout!iern Railroad 

Train departures from Plymouth, N. C. 

Subject to change, schedule not guaranteed. 
DAILY 

Leave 2:30 P. M. — Raleigh, New Bern, Beaufort. 
Goldsboro and intermediate points. Parlor car to 
New Bern. 

Leave 12:26 A. M.— Raleigh, New Bern, Beaufort, 
Goldsboro, Charlotte, Fayetteville and intermediate 
points. Sleepers to Raleigh and New Bern. 

Leave 12:30 P. M. — Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Parlor Car. 

Levae 4:00 A. M. — Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Sleeping Car. Yours very truly, 

J F. DALTON, General Pass. Agent. 




Eiireka l)y« Works, ('. D= Myers, Mgr. 

Cleaners, Dyers and Prespers. 

Mail orders given prompt and careful 

attention. 

WILMINGTON, N. 0. 



When In Elizabeth City, N. C. 

CALL ON ^ 

First and Citizens National Bank, | 

They will be glad to serve you 2 

RESOURCES OVER FOUR MILLION DOLLARS 



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GREENVILLE, N C. 



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You will profit by trading with us. 



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Specialists in apparel for Me i, WouT'n and Children. 



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GREENVILLE, N. C. 






\> The Peoples Savings Bank, 

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Will welcome your burinesH. Four per cent Interest '^ 
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THIS MONTH 
News Account of Rural Church 
Conference. 

The Bishop's Letter. 

The Treasurer's Statement, 

News of the Churches. 





:il, 1926 



Published by the Diocese of East Carolina at Plymouth, N. C, 



o 



V. 



Y\ 



o 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Oaint T^ary'cf School^ 

k JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Rev. WARREN W. WAY, Rector. 

An Episcopal School for Girls. Four years High School and two 
years College Courses. Accredited. Special courses: Music, Art, 
Expression, Home Economics, Business. 

MODERN EQUIPMENT— 20 ACRE CAMPUS. 

Advent session opens Sept. 15, 192.5. For catalogue address: 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager, Raleigh N. C. 



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An elementary and preparatory school for boys and girls 
Lovely location on coast of North Carolina; healthful cli- 
mate; comfortable room's; wholesome fo.od; daily prayer; 
preparation for college; athletics; piano; band and orchestra — 
— a home atmosphere fostered. 
Accommodation for 50 boarders. 

For further information apply to, 

MR. E. F. DUNCAN, Principal. 



Two Books You Should Buy Now 



1. Bishop William Temple's "Personal Religion and the Life of 
Fellowship." This is the book recommended to the people of the 
Church for Lenten reading by the Bishop of London. 

2. The Rev. Dr. W. C. Bell's, "Sharing In Creation." This is a 
book that will appeal to laymen who wish to learn how the results 
of modern scholarship contribute to the substance of the Chrisitan 
faith. 

Order now through the Mission Herald. 

Write the REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR., 

Plymouth, N. C. 




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The Mission Herald. 



Vol. XL. 



PLYMOUTH N. C, APRIL. 1926. 



No. 4 



A "BACK TO THE FARM" MOVEMENT 

FOR THE CHURCH 



EAST CAROLINA CLERGY CONFER AND HEAR 
ADDRESSES ON RURAL CHURCH 



(By THEODORE 
In an attempt to discover the reasons why the Episcopal 
Church is doing so little work in the rural sections and to 
formulate some constructive plan for correcting this fault, 
the clergy of the Diocese met in St. Paul's Church, Green- 
ville, for an all-day conference on April 7th. The con- 
ference was called by the Rev. J. N. L'ynum, chairman of 
the diocesan department of Christian Social S'ervice. Mr. 
Bynum presided over the conference, and the Rev. J. W. 
Heyes was named as secretary. There was a good attend- 
ance, and it is believed that a vital question has been open- 
ed that presses for solution. 

That it is of vital importance to the future well-being of 
the Church to do its share of the work of evangelization 
among the country people and of ministering to them was 
a fact fully agreed upon. One speaker went so far as to 
express the conviction that the very existence of the Church 
as a real factor in the religious life of the nation is depend- 
ent upon its recovery of a lost prestige among the country 
people, who will be the future leaders of the political, social 
and economic affairs of the nation. 

No less assurance was voiced as to the fitness of the 
Church to minister to the people of the rural sections. 
The notion that the Church appeals only to city people, and 
to people of a high level of culture at that, was denounced 
as untrue and harmful. The existence of a great need and 
the ability of the Church to meet it was joined together 
firmly in every expression of opinion. 

BISHOP DARST OPENS DISCUS'SION. 

Bishop Darst opened the discussion with an address on: 
"The history and the status of the Rural Church." He 
pointed out in the beginning that the cause for the great 
loss sustained by the Church in America during the 150 
years preceding the Revolution was due to the virtual neg- 
lect of the Mother Church in not giving us Bishops and na- 
tive clergy. The suspicion under which the Church labored 
after the Revolution, and its hesitant attitude for 50 years 
fcUowing its establishment resulted in a tremendous loss 
that it has never regained. 

Whatever discouraging factors can be stated as to the 
past, the Bishop is firmly of the opinion that the future 
holds great possibilities in East Carolina. He pointed to 
Beaufort County, with its numerous churches, as an example 
of how the Church can grow whenever the town or city 
churches send out its clergy and laity to the surrounding 
country. He had with him a chart which showed that some 



PARTRICK, JR.) 

counties in the Diocese are not even touched by the Church, 
while in others very little is done. 

MR. E'ROWN SPEAKS' OUT OF LONG EXPERIENCE. 

Bishop Darst was followed by the Rev. Bertram E. E«rown, 
Rector of Calvary Church, Tarboro, who spoke on the 
topic: "The Episcopal Church in Rural Life: Can it meet 
the Need." Mr. E'rown is perhaps the best qualified man 
in the South to answer that question, and he did it in a 
manner that was vastly interesting and pleasing. 

Saying that the Church must answer the question either 
in the affirmative or negative, the speaker immediately 
rejected the idea that the Church is not fitted to serve 
rural lite. He gave warning that the Church would grad- 
ually degenera,te into a small and bizarre sect unless it does 
go to work in the country, for it is there, he said, that 
brains and leadership come from. He quoted the words of 
Our Lord: "Go into the highways and hedges", and saw 
muc:h significance in the fact that He Himself was country 
born. Mr. Brown indignantly refuted the idea that the 
country people are ignorant and uncultured, and urged that 
we give them the best that we have. He said that such 
care would bring large returns in vigorous life. 

Mr. Brown answered the objection that the Episcopal 
Church cannot adapt itself to the methods necessary to 
reach the country people by pointing to the great hold which 
the Church of England has on the country people of Eng- 
land. The further objection that the Church with its ritual 
and sacramental ideas will not appeal to the country people 
of America was answered by pointing to the fact that such 
churches have a great appeal for the country people of 
England, France, Russia, and Italy. 

This speaker gave it as his conviction that the great need 
of the day is evangelism, and he believes that the Episcopal 
Church can meet that need for it can enter the field un- 
hampered by the methods that have become outworn. With 
its great Catholic and Evangelical combination it can both 
adapt itself to the needs of men and fill that need fully. 

AN ECONOMIC EXPERT TALKS ADOUT EAST 
CAROLINA. 

A most comprehensive paper on social and economic 
conditions in East Carolina was read by Prof. S'. H. Hobbs, 
Jr., of the University of North Carolina. Picturing this 
section as having superior resources and tremendoua possi- 
bilities that await proper methods of cultivation and flnanc- 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



ing, Mr. Hobbs called on the clergy to identity themselves 
with the life of the people and help them to realize these 
possibilities. Ihe speaker dwelt at length upon the evils of 
the faim tenantry system, and showed how the sysiem was 
getting at nought the work of the churches and schools. 
The great majority of the tenant class are unchurched 
because of their migratory habits and wretched economic 
situation. The speaker also dwelt upon the evils of the 
present system of time business and existent credit condi- 
tions. He gave it as his opinion that the clergy who Will 
lead the people out of their economic and social distress 
will do much toward their spiritual welfare. 

A CLINIC AND GENERAL DISCUSiSION IN AFTERNOON. 

Following a delightful iumh served in St. Pauls Parisii 
house by tne women of the Churcn, the clergy nad an alter- 
noon session that engaged in a round-taule discussion. The 
Rev. Mr. Lrown, whose conspicuous success with country 
missions in Edgecomb County had given such point to his 
ODservations and conclusions of the morning, conducted a 
Clinic; answering many questions as io how to interest 
laymen, hew such work on the part of the Church is re- 
garded by the communions that are already on the field, 
etc. This was followed by a general discussion that tooK 
a wide range, but showed keen interest. At its conclusion 
the chairman, Mr. liynum, summed up Ihe results of the 
discussion and asked the clergy to inform themselves en 
the question by reading such literature as is available. 

Acting upon a motion that a committee be appointed to 
formulate a diocesan program, Mr. L'ynum appointed Rev. 
Messrs. George F. Cameron and Theodore Part rick, Jr., 
to serve v^fith him. This committee will meet soon and 
make a report. 



BISHOP DARST'S MISSION IN GREENSBORO. 



INFORMATION ABOUT THE CORPORATE GIFT. 



(By Mrs. G. F. Hill.) 

The Corporate Gift will be presented at the Triennial 
Convention in Washington, D. C, in October, 1928. It will 
be divided as follows: 

St. Agnes School, Kyoto, Japan $25,000 

St. Timothy's Hospital, Cape Mount, Liberia 20,000 

Holy Trinity Church, Port au Prince, Haiti i2,500 

Church at Baguio, P. I 18,000 

St. Mark's School, Nenana, Alaska 15,000 

Church at Livramento, Brazil 8,00o 

St. Agnes' S'chool is over-crowded with many girls at 
the door for admittance — girls whose influence in future 
years will count for much if they can be given Christian 
training. Our gift will finish an addition already under 
construction. "The Liberian Hospital will serve three large 
tribes of Africans who depend entirely upon our Church 
for medical aid in this district. 

In the midst of Voodooism with its cruel rites and de- 
grading superstition, the Cathedral at Port au Prince, the 
capital of Haiti, which our gift will complete, will stand as 
a stronghold of God among savage people, .\mong the 
Igarots in Daguio, the Church which our money will also 
ccmplete, is another witness to our faith and the pov/er of 
Jesus Christ. 

in the interior of Alaska, among gentle --and easily led 
Indians, a new dormitcry is needed for St. Mark's Schcoi 
whicli is attended by boys and girls who come from many 
miles as in a vast area practically the only religious work 
is done by our Church. In Livramento Brazil, the hearta 
of a devoted native congregation will be cheered by our 
aid in building their church. They have been sacrificing 
for years to accumulate a certain sum themselves while wor- 
shipping in an old store. 

Children of Alaska and Japan, natives of other lands 
and the faithful men and women who minister unto them 
will be the lieneflciaries of the Corporate Gift. Will >ou 
not do your part both by your gifts and prayers? 



PEOPLE OF HOLY TRINITY MUCH IMPRESSED WITH 
HIS SERMONS. 

(The Carolina Churchman.) 
It was evident from the first service held by Bishop 
Darst during the Mission he held at Holy Trinity, Greens- 
boro, February 28-March 7, that the people had prepared 
tor his message through prayer. At every meeting of 
every organization preparatory to the Mission, in the 
homes and in the Churcn and Church School special pray- 
ers were said for the success of the Mission. The Bishop 
literally, "came, saw and conquered" Greensboro. For the 
six week-day mornings the Holy Communion and Medita- 
tion service was held at 7 o'clock. The attendance at 
tnese services averaged exactly 32 per day. The evening 
services, the children's services and the Sunday services 
were all well attended. Both the L'ishop and the members 
of the parish felt that the Mission was a great success. 
It was the unanimous feeling of all who heard him that 
the National Church has laid her hands upon the rigni 
man to be Chairman of the National Commission on Evan- 
gelism. The acceptance of eleven invitations for meals, 
and the inability to accept seven or eight other invitations 
for meals surely testified to the impress that Bishop Darst 
made upon the Church people of Greensboro. They heard 
him preach. They immediately felt, "There is a man we 
must have in our homes." The Civic Clubs eagerly list- 
ened to his practical words on better citizenship. At the 
Civitan Club a handsome basket of flowers testified to 
the appreciation on the part of a florist member or the 
message to the club. Church people from, Reidsville, 
Winston-Salem, Thomasville and Burlington came for 
different services. People . of other communions in the 
city, together with college girls and faculty, came and 
went away with a new hold upon life. It was a source of 
great pride of Holy Trinity that she should be the first 
parish to be visited in the itinerary of Bishop Darst for 
his National Program. At the end of the Mission on 
Sunday evening there was placed in the Alms Basin two 
"golden bags'' of gold from laymen of the parish as a 
mark of appreciation for the Mission. The second "bag" 
was for the rector, evidently as a token of appreciation 
that he had been the means of bringing E'lshop Darst to 
the parish. The Bishop said that this made him appre- 
ciate his own gift far more, it being the first instance he 
had known of such a tribute. It is felt that great good 
will come from the soul stirring sermons of one who is 
"on fire" with the message of the Master. 

FORTY-SEVEN MILLION BELONG TO CHURCHES IN 
AMERICA. 

Nearly 47,000,000 persons are members of churches in 
this country, according to the annual census of The 
Christian Herald. 

The churches gained more than 800,000 members in 1925, 
the largest gain in many years,, according to the census. 
This IS described as "an ample harvest of sheaves," in- 
dicating a religious revival in spite of the bitter religious 
controversies of the last year. 

According to the census the Catholics in this country 
number 16,047,914, the Methodist Episcopal is the next 
lar,gest denomination, with 4,516,806 members. The census 
numbers the members of Jewish congregations at 357,135, 
but a note says that these are chiefly heads of families. 
The Catholics are credited with a gain of 203,990 during 
the year. The Methodists including the South and North 
divisions and other variations have a total membership 
of 8,920,190, and their gains of 220,183 were the largest 
recorded for any family group of denominations. 

The Baiitists (fourteen different bodies) have a total 
membership of 8,397,914 with gains of 101,396 members 
in 1925. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



The Bishop's Letter. 

During the first week in March I conducted a Mission 
in Holy Trinity Church, Greensboro, that being fhe first 
preaching mission conducted by me since assuming my 
duties as chairman of the National Commission on Evan- 
gelism. 

It was a real pleasure and privilege to be with my good 
friend, the Rev. I. Harding Hughes and his fine people, 
and if the members of the splendid congregations who 
filled the Church each night received just one third as 
much help from the mission as I did, I am sure that the 
somewhat strenuous week was wonderfully worth while. 

On Wednesday night, March 10th, upon invitation of the. 
pastor. Rev. Doctor Gilmore, I delivered an address on 
Evangelism to the congregation of the First Presbyterian 
Church in the Auditorium of the Tileston School, Wil- 
mington. 

On Thursday the eleventh I made an address at the 
afternoon Lenten service in St. James' Church, Wilming- 
ton. 

On Sunday, the 14th, I preached in St. Paul's, Beaufort, 
at 11 A. M. and 7:30 P. M. Confirming three persons, pre- 
sented by the rector, Rev. George W. Lay, D.C.L , at the 
evening service. 

In the afternoon Dr. Lay and I went across to Morehead 
City by boat in time for a service in our attractive little 
St. Andrew's Chapel, at 3 P. M. 

At this service I preached and confirmed four persons. 

This Chapel, which is a portable one has been occupying 
a borrowed lot since it was erected in Morehead, but I am 
glad to report that through the generosity of one of our 
local Communicants, it will have a permanent resting 
place in another section of the rapidly growing town. 

On Tuesday, the sixteenth, at 5 P. M., acting for Bishop 
Guerry who was convalescing from an operation I made 
an address and confirmed five persons in St. Philip's 
Church. Charleston, S'. C. 

On Tuesday evening I preached and confirmed three 
persons in St. Andrew's Church, Mount Pleasant, S. C. 

On Wednesday evening, the seventeenth, I preached and 
confirmed thirty-five persons in Grace Church, Charleston. 

On Thursday and Friday night, the eighteenth and nine- 
teenth, I had the great privilege of attending the mission 
conducted by Bishop Charles M. Beckwith, of Alabama, in 
St. .James' Church, Wilmington. 

F'ishop Bteckwith's Mission was most helpful and his 
sermons and addresses made a profound impression on 
the people of Wilmington. 

On Sunday, the twenty-first at 11 A. M.. I preached and 
confirmed eleven persons presented by the rector. Rev. 
Archer Poogher, in St. John's Church, Fayetteville. 

In the afternoon I preached and confirmed two persons. 
]}resented by Mr. Boogher, in The Chapel of the Good Sliep- 
herd, Tolar-Hart Mill Village. Fayetteville. 

At night, T preached and confirmed four persons, pre- 
sented by Mr. Boogher, in St. Philip's Chapel, "Campbell- 
ton", Fayetteville. 

Immediately after this service I confirmed a sick man 
in his home for St. Philip's. 

On Wednesday, the twenty-fourth I preached to a lar,ge 
congregation at a Community Lenten Service in Old Christ 
Church. Savannah, Georgia. 

On the morning of the twenty-fifth I celebrated Holy 
Communion and conducted a quiet Hour for the Church 
Women of Savannah in S't. Paul's Church. 

On the afternoon of Friday, the twenty-sixth. T con- 
firmed two persons presented by the rector. Rev. Alexander 
Miller, in St. Paul's Church, Wilmington 

This was a special service as the nersons confirmed will 
not be in Wilmington when I go to St. Paul's for ray regu- 
lar appointment in April. 



This letter is being written on Saturday, the twenty- 
seventh, and my appointments for tomorrow — Palm Sun- 
day — are S't. John's, Wilmington, in the morning, and a 
mass meeting of the women of the City in Grace Metho- 
dist Church, Wilmington, tomorrow afternoon. 

Holy Week will be spent in Philadelphia where I will 
speak at the Noon-Day Ijenten Service each day, including 
Good Friday, returning to Wilmington for my usual Con- 
firmation Service at the Church of the Good Shepherd on 
Easter Day. 

April will be an unusually busy month as I have many 
engagements in the Diocese, and will also be very busy 
preparing for my western trip. 

I am planning to leave Wilmington on the twenty-seventh 
and will hold Conference on Evangelism in Atlanta and 
New Orleans on the twenty-eighth and twenty-ninth. 

From New Orleans, I will go straight through to Long 
Beach, California, in time to preach the opening sermon 
at the meeting of the Synod of the Pacific on May fifth. 

Following the meeting of the Synod I will visit Fresno, 
S'an Francisco, Sacramento, Portland, Seattle, Minneapolis, 
Chicago, St. Louis and other cities in the interest of the 
National Commission on Evangelism. The trip will be long 
and strenuous, and I would like to feel that my dear peo- 
lile in East Carolina were praying that God would give me 
the strength and the wisdom necessary to the accomplish- 
ment of the task that has been committed to my hands. 

I regret very much that I will, necessarily, have to be 
away from the Diocese a great deal during the next few 
months, but I am comforted by the thoughts that my 
dear friends of the clergy and laity are willing and anxious 
for me to attempt this great work for Christ and His 
Church. 

Faithfully. Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARS'T. 



NEWS OF MR. HEYES FIELD. 



VISITING CLERGY IN FARMVILLE DURING LENT. 



An unusual and interesting baptism took place in Snow 
Hill on March 12th when the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Samuel P. Morrill was baptized by the rector. The water 
which was used' for the ceremony had been brought 
from the River Jordan by friends specially for the occasion. 
The Merrills are an old family in this section, and are re- 
sponsible for some of the first services of the Church in 
Snow Hill and Farmville. 

The vestry of Emmanuel Parish, Farmville, have recently 
purchased a lot on which they hope to build a rectory at a 
very early date. Also, the women of the Parish are stead- 
ily working to increase the funds which are being set aside 
for the purpose of building a Parish House which is sadly 
needed in order to give the S'unday school the necessary 
room for its classes. This parish is fortunate in having 
a valuable teacher of the adult Bible class, Mr, R. T. Martin, 
who holds his members after having taught them for almost 
two years. The Auxiliary is now using "The Search for 
Peace" as a Lenten text-book for their study meetings which 
are held every Friday in addition to the regular scheduled 
meetings. We have been happy in the privilege of hav- 
in.g special visiting clergymen during the Lenten season. 
.Amongst the visitin,g clergymen have been Rev. Francis J. 
Craighill of Rocky Mount, Rev. Edward F. Baxter of Wilson. 
Pev. Arthur J. Mackie and Rev. James E. W. Cook. Lenten 
services are also being held in E'allard's school house, near 
Farmville by the Rector. The Rev. W. R. Noe has been se- 
cured to hold a Mission at this place and it is hoped that 
v,'p may he able to establish a Mission there. The Rector 
is also holding services in Macclesfield at the request of the 
archdeacon of the diocese of North Carolina by the consent 
of our own Bishop. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



STATEMENT OF AMOUNTS PAID ON APPORTION- 
MENTS FOR THE CHURCH'S PROGRAM- 
DIOCESAN AND GENERAL— TO 
APRIL 1, 1926- 



FIRST. 



THIRD. 

Ayden, St. James' 

Beaufort, St. Paul's , 

Belhaven St. James' 

Bonnerton, S't. John's. 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Gatesville, St. Mary's. 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Roper, St Luke's . . . . 

Southport, S't. Philip's 

Williamston, Church of Advent., 

Winton. St. John's 

Columbia, St. Andrew's . . 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Roxobel. St. Mark's 

Snow Hill, S't. Barnabas' 

Warsaw. Calvary 

Whiteville, Grace Church.. 

Ye^tesville. St. Matthew's 

Avoca H'oly Innocents' 

Morehead City, S't. Andrew's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 



FOURTH. 

Atkinson, St. Thomas'. 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

E'ath, St. Thomas'. 

Chocowinity, Trinity 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's. 

Grifton, S't. John's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church. 

Jessama, Zion 

Lake Landing, St. George's.. 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 

Red Sprin,gs. St Stephen's 

S'even Springs, Holy Innocents'. . . . 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 

Wilmington, St. Mark's 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 

Biunyan, St. S'tephen's 

Edenton, St. John's 

Edward, Redeemer 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 

Fairfield, All Saints' 

Faison, St. Gabriel's , 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 



2506.21 



Paid by 
Location and Parish. Apportionment Parish 

Edenton, St. Paul's .$3000.00 $962.76 

Wilmington, S't. James'.. 11040.00 

Woodville, Grace Church 500.00 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Winterville. St. Luke's 

SECOND. 

Creswell, St. David's 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church.. 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 

Greenville, St Paul's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity. . . . ., 

Kinston, St. Mary's 

New Darn, Christ Church 

Plymouth, Grace Church 

Washington, St. Peter's 

Wilmington, S't. John's 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 

Windsor, St. Thomas'. 



100.00 


17 


90 


200.00 


60 


00 


700.00 


35 


00 


241.5.00 


450 


00 


4300.00 


. 700 


00 


1500.00 


218 


65 


2100.00 






1170.00 






2500.00 


25 


00 


4000.00 






1000.00 






4500.00 


375 


00 


3000.00 


421 


41 


1995.00 


88 


46 


800.00 






320.00 


50 


00 


600.00 


90 


04 


500.00 


80 


90 


100.00 


6 


20 


400.00 






250.00 






200.00 






350.00 


62 


9(T 


250.00 


50 


00 


500.00 






200.00 


66 


00 


300.00 






530.00 






125.00 






200.00 






80.00 






90.00 






100.00 






130.00 






70.00 


18 


00 


60.00 






100.00 






500.00 






100.00 


3 


00 


100.00 






200.00 






250.00 






150.00 






275.00 


14 


98 


250.00 


15 


00 


400.00 


65 


00 


100.00 






240.00 






100.00 






300.00 


55 


37 


400.00 


52 


47 


150.00 


2 


00 


25.00 






150.00 


21 


25 


25.00 






50.00 






35.00 






50.00 






50.00 







Lumberton, Trinity 100.00 

Maxton, St. Matthew's 50.00 

North West, All Souls' 50.00 

Sladesville, St. John's 30.00 

S'unbury, S't. Peter's 100 . 00 

Trenton, Grace Church 125.00 

Washington, St. Paul's 250.00 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's. 100.00 

Aurora, St Jude's 100 . 00 

Ayden, St. Thomas' 45 . 00 

Beaufort, S't. Clement's 40.00 

Gcldsboro, St. Andrew's 100.00 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 125.00 

Jasijer, St. Thomas' 50 . 00 

Kinston Christ Church 75.00 

Murfreesboro. S't. E^.irnabas' . . . . 50.00 

Oriental, St. Thomas' 25.00 

Pikeville, Mis'iion 50 . 00 

Pollorksville,' Mission 48 . 00 

Robersonville, Mission 25.00 

Roper, St. Ann's 60 . 00 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 130.00 

WillianT^ton, St. Ignatius' 30.00 

Wilmington, "Brcoklyn", Mission 15.00 

Wrightsville. "McCumber's". Mission. 20.00 

Farmville, Mission 15.00 



25.00 



1.00 



15.00 
12.50 

10.00 



$55983.00 $6577.00 



URGES ORGANIZATION OF MEN'S CLUBS. 



At a meeting of the Annual Convention, held in St John's 
Church, Wilmin.gton, January 26th and 27, the following 
reschitions were adopted: 

"Resolved, That the Convention authorize the organiza- 
tion of Men's Clubs in the Parishes and Missions of the 
Diocese and that the direction of this work be under the 
supervision of the Field Department of the Executive Coun- 
cil and that this department is requested to begin the 
formation of such clubs as soon as possible. 

"Be it further Resolved, That the Field Department be 
authoriz'^d to draft, print and send out a form of Constitu- 
tion and By-Laws with the aims and ob.le'^tives of this move- 
ment as «et forth, and a sufficient sum be authorized to 
launch fiis movement." 

"Pesolvprt. Tb^t this Convention recommends to e^ch 
nnric^h and IMispion in the Dio-^ese. the formi'tion of a Men's 
Club, under the ausni'-es and direction of the Field De- 
partment, as approved in Resolution heretofore, at this ses- 
sion adopted, and that the Secretary of the Convention be 
direr-ted to send to the Rector of each Parish, and to the 
clergyman in charge of each Mission, a cony of this resolu- 
tion with remie=t that it be presented to the men of said 
Parish or Mission, with the request that they act accord- 
ingly." 



ST. LUKE'S. WINTERVILLE. GIVEN CANDLESTlCKSi. 



(Greenville Reflertor ) 
At the Easter service at St. Luke's Emsco"-il Church 
yesterday afterncon the Rev. James E. W. Cook dedif'ated 
two beautiful brass Euf^haristir- candlesticks. The candle- 
sticks were made by the Gorham Company, Ecclesiastical 
furnishers of New York City, and were presented to the 
parish by Mr. and Mrs. Ashley St, Amand, of Wilmington. 
The ceremony was beautiful and impressive, as the rector 
explained the significance of the altar candles in Episcopal 
services. 



All six hran'^hes of the Norfolk, Va., pub.lic library and 
eight public libraries in Maryland received paid subscrip- 
tion to The Spirit of Missions, through the diocesan, 
branches of the Church Periodical Club. 



THE MISSION HERATJ>. 



GROUND BROKEN FOR ST. PETERS PARISH HOUSE. 



WASHINGTON CHURCH TO MAKE PROVISION FOR 
YOUNG PEOPLE. 



(Washington, N. C, News, March 23rd.) 

One of the most important events to have happened 
in conneclion with St. Peter's Episcopal Church took 
place Tuesday atternoon when i«.embers of the church and 
a number of other visitors attended the exercises that 
marked the breaking of ground for the huge three-story 
brick parish house which is to be erected on the church 
property. 

The exercise started at four o'clock Rev. Stephen Gard- 
ner presided. A program of hymns and prayer was car- 
ried out, following which T. Harvey Myers, junior warden 
of St. Peter's parish, gave the order for breaking ground. 
He stated that he had selected a girl to lift the first spade- 
ful of dirt; a girl whose ancestors had been closely con- 
nected with the history of the church for several genera- 
tions past— Rena Hoyt Harding, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edmund Harding. Rena performed her task in splendid 
fashion, lilting out a large shovelful of dirt. Other mem- 
bers of the church followed her. 

It was an auspicious occasion for St. Peter's and marked 
an important milestone in the history of the church. The 
plans for the new parish house call for a building that 
will be ccmplete in every department and that will give 
ample accommodations for gymnastic work, banquets, club 
meetings and other gatherings. All of the members are 
greatly interested in the erection of the new building. 

The ceremony, in connection with the erection of the 
parish house, will be the laying of the cornerstone, which 
is expected to take place some time this summer. The 
Grand Lodge of Masons will have charge of the exercises 
on that occasion. 

Little Miss Harding has an interesting "family tree," 
which was read at the exercises yesterday by Mr. Myers 
and which brought out the following relationships: 

Granddaughter of Rev. Nathaniel Harding and Rena B. 
Hoyt Harding. 

Great Granddaughter of the present Senior Warden 
John G. Bragaw, Sr , and his wife Annie C. Hoyt. 

Great Grand-daughter of Cr. Wm. A. Dlount 4th Senior 
Warden of the Parish. 

Great Grand-daughter of Edmund S. Hoyt, 3rd S'enior 
Warden of the Parish. 

Great great grand-daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James E. 
Hoyt and great great grand-daughter of Mrs. Margaret 
Mutter Blount Hoyt. 

Great Great Grand-daughter of Thomas H. Blount 1st 
Author of the first letter "concerning the erection of a 
church building" and his wife Elizabeth Mutter Blount, 
one time organist. 

Great Great Great Grand-daughter of Eli Hoyt first Sen- 
ior Warden of the Parish and his wife Ann Cambreling, 
first organist of the church. 

Therefore directly descended from four of the five Sen- 
ior Wardens of the Parish. 

Mr. Wm. E. DeMille the second Senior Warden was a 
close family connection. 

Her father is the present organist in the church and 
at different times for a period of about 100 years, her 
aunts, three great great aunts (one of them Miss E. M'. 
B. Hoyt who filled the position for thirty years), her great 
great grandmother and her great, great, great grandmother 
have served in this capacity 

Her great great Uncle Thos. H. Blount the 2nd was a 
member, of the building committee of the present church 
and the other two members were her kinsmen. 

She is also the great, great niece of Miss Patsy E'aker 
Blount who beautified the Church Yard with many rare 
shrubs and trees. 

Her grand mother Mrs. Katie Blount Bragaw was a 



life time member of the choir as is her mother Mrs. Katie 
Bragaw Harding. 

Her great uncle John G. Bragaw, Jr., means so much 
to this parish and to the Church at large, that he is called 
the Laymen's L'ishop. 

Her father Edmund H. Harding is a member of the 
building committee of the Parish House. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS PAID IN MARCH, 1926. 



Those paying one dollar: Mrs. D. E. Woodley, Mrs. C. A. 
Mann, Mrs. G. T. Brett, Mrs. T. H. Shepard, Julian Wood, 
Mrs. George Capehart, Miss M. W. Winborne, Mrs. H. N. 
Parsley, Mrs. A. P. McClammy, Miss May Kingsbury, E. B. 
Marston, Mrs. T. F. Winslow, Mrs. O. G. Mann, Mrs. C. E. 
McCullen, Mrs. C. C. Branch, Mrs. J. H. Hardin, Miss 
Theresa Agostini, Mrs. T. O. Bunting, Mrs. K. O. Buigwyn, 
Mrs. William Calder,, Mrs. William Lattimer, Mrs. Donald 
McRae, Mrs. J. R. Murchison, Mrs. E. L. Spooner, Mrs. W. 
L. Williams, Mrs. Marshall Westcoat, Rev. A Miller, Mrs. 
E. P. Bailey, Mrs. R. L. Holmes, Mrs. J. W. Perry, Miss 
Marguerite Walker, Mrs. W. C. Galloway, Mrs. John Pugh, 
Mrs. T. Litchfield, Mrs. W. J. McWilliams, Mrs. W. T. 
Bryan, Mrs. W. H. Guilford, Miss Annie Snell, Mrs. S. M. 
S'parrow, Mrs. L. T. Thompson, Mrs. C. S. Watson, Mrs. 
Theodore Guilford, Mrs. F. R. Alfred, Warrick Moore, 
Mrs. S. W. Styron, L. D. Burton, Mrs. Robert E'ogart, Mrs. 
Ralph Hodges, Miss Bertha Newman, Miss Elizabeth Tyre, 
Mrs. Zada Braddy, Mrs. A. L. Bowers, Mrs. James Hodges, 
Mrs. A. W. Carty, Mrs. R. C. Keys, Mrs. J. K. Hoyt, Mrs. 
Justus Randolph, Mrs. E. P. Martin, Mrs. Harry McMullan, 
Mrs. Claude Davis, Mrs. W. L. Laughinghouse, Mrs. W. A. 
Dlount, Sr., Mrs. D. VV. Bell, Mrs. E. H. Harding, J. B. Fowie, 
S. F. Alligood, J, G. Bragaw, Jr., Mrs. William von Eber- 
stein, Mrs. David Tayloe, Sr., Mrs. B. F. Bowers, Mrs. J. B. 
Moore, Mrs. G. C. Harding, Mrs. M. E. Watson, Mrs. Julia 
Dickinson, Mrs. M. M. Hill, Mrs. S'. H. Adams, Mrs. W. L. 
Scruggs, Mrs. W. O. Southerland, Dr. J. H. HoopejV 
Mrs. A. C. Camache, Mrs. E, E.'. Pleasants, Mrs. J. W. 
VVilliamscn, Mrs. W. F. Register, Mrs. Clayton Giles, Mrs. J. 
Hicks Bunting, Mrs. W. L. Parsley, J. V. Grainger, J. L. 
Hazelhurst, Jr., Mrs. Thos. Wright, Mrs. T. A. Smithwick, 
Mrs. T. H. Blount, Rev. J. N. Bynum, Mrs. S. W. Clark, 
Mrs. George Cooper, Lee R. Smith, Mrs. E*. F. S'tearn, Mrs. 
Thomas Swindell, Mrs. J. L. Taylor, Mrs. J. G. Tooley, Miss 
Lida Wallace, Mrs. N. Credle, Sr., Mrs. C. P. Wales, Miss 
May Houston, Mrs. J. D. Biggs, Mrs. M. H. Bonner, Mrs. 
John H. Bonner, Mrs. E. M. Brown, Mrs. H. P. E'rown, Mrs. 
J. B. Bowers, Miss Fannie H. Bryan, Mrs. Julia Campbell, 
Mrs. C. L. Carrow, Mrs. J. D. Grimes, Mrs. W. D. Grimes, 
Mrs. E. T. Knott, Miss Jane Myers, Mrs. T. Harvey Myers, 
Mrs. W. A. Respass, Mrs. J. C. Rodman, Miss Rachel Rum- 
ley, Mrs. N. L. Sawyer, Mrs. V. D. STielburne, Mrs. R. S. 
Silverthorne, Mrs. E. S. Simmons, Mrs. Guy C. S'mall, Miss 
Josephine Whitney, Mrs. W. H. Williams, Mrs. E. R. Wind- 
ley, D. W. Bell, Mrs. W. B. Rodman, Jr., Mrs. Robert Trippe, 
Mrs. John Pittman, W. J. Boyd, Mrs. E. F. Burney, Mrs. H. 
G. EMrton, Mrs. Alex Cuthrell, G. A. Johnson, Mrs. R. L. 
Johnson, Mrs. Zeno Lyon, Mrs. Aldine Quinnerly, Mrs. 
Helen Turnage, W. B. Tyson, W. A. Quinnerly, Miss Louise 
Hooks, J. K. Quinnerly. Total $146.00. 

Those paying more than one dollar: Miss Mayme Whit- 
field, $2.00; Mrs. John G. Blount, $5.00; Mrs. R. E. Tapp, 
$2.00; Mrs. George Rountree, $2.00; Miss Emma Cuthrell,. 
$2.00; Mrs. L. M Disosway, $5.00; Miss Mary Pruden, $1.50; 
Miss A. Booth,, $2.00; F. H. Fechtig, $2.00; Miss Pencie 
C. Warren, $5.00; R. E. Tapp, $2 00; Mrs. A. Capehart, 
$2.00; Mrs. E. G. Weston, $2.00; J. H. Burney, $3.00; Mrs. J. 
P. Edmondson, $2.00. Total, $39.50. 

Total for month, $185 50. 



S'everal clergymen of East Carolina took the services 
at St. Mary's, Kinston, during Dr. Hartley's absence for 
several weeks in March and April. 



TUE MISSION HERALD. 



XLbc /IIMssion Tbeialb. 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly at 

PLYMOUTH, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Subscription One Dollar A Year 

EDITORIAL STAFF: 
Editor: 
REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR. 
Contributing Editors: 
RT. REV. THOMAS' C. DARST, D.D. 
REV. R. B. DRANE, D.D. 
REV. JAMES E. W. COOK, 
MRS. JAMES G. STATON. 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 



NOTICE OF ENTRY. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage, pro- 
vided for in Section llOS.Act of October 3, 1917, author- 
ized November 30th, 1918. 

Subscribers changing their addresses, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Alanager, giving 
when necessary, both the old and new addresses. 

Subscribers wishing to discontinue their subscriptions 
should so notify the Manager, as an absence of such nocili- 
cation is considered a continuance of the subscription. 

All articles for publication should reach the Business 
Manager by the 25th of the month. New subscriptions, 
renewals, requests for change of address and copy for ad- 
vertisements should be sent to 

REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR., 

Plymouth, N. C. 

IS SOMETHING TO BE DONE ABOUT IT? 

East Carolina shares with the whole Church in America 
the stigma of the neglect of a great body of our people — 
those who live in the country and villages. That this 
neglect is not as thorough-going here as in some other 
dioceses is not an answer that can give us comfort so 
long as there are vast stretches where the Church is un- 
known. That this neglect is not to be charged up to 
this generation as much as to some generations that have 
gone before is perfectly true, but that does not relieve us 
of concern for the present diminishing growth of the 
rural churches. A conference of the rural clergy, such 
as that held in Greenville on April 7th, may not change 
the situation in East Carolina, but it is a step in the 
right direction. The clergy heard addresses which stated 
the problem, and at the same time pointed the way to its 
solution. Mr. Brown, of Tarboro, who with his laymen 
ministers to a large number of country people in a num- 
ber of missions, is quite certain that the Episcopal Church 
should and can effectively reach the rural population. 
Impressive figures and illustrations were given to prove 
that the very existence of the Church is dependent upon 
its responsiveness to this need. It is not too late to re- 
trieve our losses; that much seems to be certain. E'ut we 
hope that the matter will go beyond being accepted as a 
subject for debate. T. P.. JR. 



THE NECESSITY. 

When we come to analyze the fact that the Church is 
weak in the rural sections we come face to face with the 
same problems that affect other professions than that of 
the ministry. Like the present generation of physicians, 
our clergy are educated away from rural life. They come 



troni universities and professional schools with certain 
lastes and with certain ideas of laboratory, library and 
clinical equipment that a small place finds it difficult to 
supply. The sad fact is that when the Bishop sends them 
to the small rural churches they regard it as the lowest 
round of a ladder that will enable them to climb to some- 
thing higher. The idea of promotion is not to build up 
ilie field, but to get away from it as quickly as possible. 
Tiie manifest need is for a different attitude and practice. 
What the country and small town churches need is a min- 
istry that will make the people's life its own. Instead 
of studying to get away, the clergy should study that they 
might enter more fully and intelligently into the prob- 
lems 01 the people. We have heard the expression, "coun- 
try-minded clergy", and like it, for it sums up the real 
need. A clergy who would make common cause with the. 
people of Kasi Carolina; who had a real grasp of the 
social and economic conditions, and labored to better 
them; and whose ambition was more for the cause than 
tor self, could in a few years reverse the position of the 
Church. As for the question of inadequate salaries in 
lire small places, the answer would not be far behind a 
lew years of self-denying service and identification with 
the life of the people. T. P., JR. 



MR. HOBBiS POINTS OUT A GRAVE PERIL. 

in his admirable and exhaustive paper read before the 
vonfeifeuce of rural clergy in Greenville, Prof. S. H. Hobbs, 
Jr., of ihe University of North Carolina, dwelt upon the 
tenant and credit system of eastern North Carolina, show- 
ing that it is an economic blight upon the section. It has 
its social and religious aspects, too, all of which vitally 
affect the Church. The Church is directly affected by the 
tenant system, for it is destructive of that love of home 
and stability of social life that is essential to the develop- 
ment of the people. A. twin evil is the credit system 
that enslaves the people and promotes tenantry. The 
Church may be warned to steer clear of economic ques- 
tions, but this is one that is not merely economic. A 
people caught in the net of a system that denies them 
the right to own their own homes and which renders them 
a migratory and unstable class, will make poor soil for 
spiritual growth. They will become the victims rather 
than the beneficiaries of our boasted program of develop- 
ment, for as taxes mount land will be harder to acquire 
and hold, and wealth will become the more concentrated. 
Such results will make for discontent and the creation 
of class prejudice and class struggle, all of whicn is con- 
trary to that ideal of life which the Church holds. The 
Church can well afford to join with those far-sighted 
1 "(Jers who are working to put into the hands of the 
people the means of achieving their ecouciiuc freedom, 
and to put into their minds the desire for inaep-mdence 
and stability of life. The Church must supijlv Itii spirit- 
ual dynamic for the promotion of that fulness of life 
that goes with a happy and contented people. P. P., JR 



BISHOP DARST'S APPOINTMENTS FOR APRIL. 



■i — Good Shepherd, Wilmington. 

7 — Rural Conference, Greenville, 10 A. M. 
St. Paul's, Greenville, 8 P. M. 

11 — St. James', Wilmington, 11 A. M. 
St. Paul's, Wilmington. 8 P. M. 

14 — Meeting of lioard of Trustees, St. Mary's S'chool, 
Raleigh. 

18— Christ Church, Elizabeth City, N. C. 

22 — Piedmont Assembly, Brotherhood of St. Andrew, Char- 
lotte, N. C. 

25— St. Stephen's Church, Goldsboro, 11 A. M. 
Mission, Pikeville, 7:30 P. M. 

28 — Conference on Evangelism, Atlanta. 

29 — Conference on Evangelism, New Orleans. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



I 



CHURCH KALENDAR APRIL-MAY, 1926. 



'O live ye by the Kalendar, 

And with the good ye dwell; 

The Spirit that came down on them 

Will Lighten you as well." — Bishop Coxe. 



April 
May 



I 



25 — S. Mark, Evangelist 
1 — SS'. Philip and James 
2 — Fourth Sunday after Easter 
9 — Fifth Sunday after Easter 

13 — Ascension Day 

16 — Sunday after Ascension Day 



(Red; 

(Red) 
(White) 
(White 
(White) 
(White) 



Personal items. 



The Rev. J. W. Heyes, of Farniville, was in demand as 
a special px'eacher during Lent. He preached at services 
in Washington, Windsor, Rocky Mount, and in Christ 
Church, Raleigh. 



The Rev. J. E. W. Cook, Rector of St. Paul's, Green- 
ville, opened the Eastern Carolina Exposition with prayer 
on April 5th. 



Bishop Darst is scheduled to address special groups ot 
clergy and laity in Atlanta and iNew Orleans on April 
28 and 29. These two important stops ne will make on 
his journey to the meeting of tae .bynod of the province ot 
the Pacific. 



The Southern Churchman is publishing each week a 
sermon by one of the outstanding preachers of the Ameri- 
can Church. One of the first sermons printed was by 
the Rev. W. H. Milton, D.D., Rector of St. James, Wil- 
mington. 



Among the East Carolina clergy who expect to attend 
the Church Congress in Richmond, Va., the last week in 
April are the Rev. Messrs. J. N. Bynum, of Belhaven; C. 
B. Williams, of Creswell. and Theodore Partrick, Jr., of 
Plymouth. 



FARMVILLE WOMEN MAKE EASTER GIFT TO 
PRISONERS. 



April 9, 1926. 
The Rev. Theodore Partrick, Plymouth, N. C. 

While visiting around among my folks in Farmville I 
came across the following letter in the home of a mem- 
ber of our social service committee in the Parish. 

(April 3, 1926.) 
Dear Mrs (name withheld) : 

I thank you for yours of the 31st ult. advising that you 
were sending to the prisoners confined in safe keeping 
department a Caramel Cake as an Easter gift. The cake 
came yesterday about noon in perfect condition, and 
although I do not eat cake, I think I was more inclined 
to eat some of this one than any I have seen recently. 

So that the prisoners would get the cake while it was 
fresh, I immediately took it to them that they might see 
it. After which, I cut it into eight large slices, one for 
each prisoner. All of them are deeply grateful to you, 
and asked that I express their thanks. 

With personal appreciation, I am, with best wishes. 
Respectfully yours, 

GEORGE ROSS POU, 
Superintendent of State Prison. 
This cake was sent to the eight men who are now in 
"death row" at the State prison. 

Sincerely yours, 

J. W. HEYES. 



Diocesan News. 



WHAT THE CHURCH IS DOING IN DIOCESE OF EAST 
CAROLINA. 

From all over the Diocese come reports of splendid 
Easter services, well attended and with attractive music. 
Of growing importance is the special service on Easter 
for the young people. Junior choirs in many of the 
churches are especially active in Lent, and are well pre- 
pared for musical programs on Easter. There is a grow- 
ing emphasis, too, on Easter Communions, when every 
communicant is urged to attend one celebration. 



Miss Annie Morton Stout, an expert in religious educa- 
tion, is to visit several points in the Diocese during a ten 
day period in April. Miss Stout is employed by the de- 
i;urtnient of Religious Education of the Province of 
Sewanee. The Rev. G. W. Lay has arranged her schedule. 



Due to the absence of Bishop Darst for several weeks 
in the Spring, it is probable that a visiting L'ishop will 
made a number of visits in East Carolina for confirma- 
tion services. Several Bishops have ofiered their ser- 
vices, knowing that our own Diocesan would be much oc- 
cupied with his duties as chairman of the Commission 
on Evangelism. The visits will be made in the Convoca- 
tion of Edenton. 



The Mission Herald has received volume one number 
one of "Christ Church Tidings", a parochial paper that 
will promote the interests of Christ Church, New Bern. 
The Rector, the Rev. Guy H. Madara, is editor of the pub- 
lication. The first number of it is very creditable. 



St. Philip's, Southport, was served by the Rev. W. R. 
N|Oe during Holy Week and on Easter. Mr. Noe writes 
that the three hour service on Good Friday was well 
attended, and that all of the ministers in town took part. 
At the Easter services there were splendid congregations. 
Mr. Noe was of the opinion that the S'outhport Sunday 
School would make a strong bid for the banner given for 
the best record in the Lenten mite box offering. 



The churches of the Diocese have received a letter from 
a committee appointed to carry out a resolution of me 
recent diocesan convention that the Diocese accept a quota 
of $7,000 for the maintenance fund of the Thompson 
Orphanage, and that each church be advised of its share 
of this amount. In its letter the committee suggested 
that the Thanksgiving or Christmas offering, or both, 
be set aside for this purpose. 



The Standing Committee had a meeting in Greenville 
on April 7th, with the Rev. Messrs. R. £•. Drane, D.D., 
Stephen Gardner and Theodore Partrick,, Jr , in attend- 
ance. The papers of Mr. Harrel J. Lewis, a candidate for 
Holy Orders, were approved, and consent given to his 
ordination to the diaconate in June. Mr. Lewis is now a 
student in the Virginia Seminary. He is a young man 
of great promise. 



Christ Church, Elizabeth City, which has been altered 
slightly and thoroughly renovated concurrently with the 
erection of its parish house, now presents a very hand- 
some appearance, having one of the most beautiful in- 
teriors of any church in the Diocese. The lengthening 
of the chancel is the principal item of alteration. The 
parish house, rapidly nearing completion, will give this 
Church a splendid equipment for the religious training 
of its young people. The Rector, the Rev. George F. Hill, 
has worked untiringly for the completion of the project, 
and he has had the co-operation of the whole parish. 



]ll 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



LOVING CUP GIVEN MRS. STATON. 



PROGRAM OF EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE AT 
FAYETTEVILLE. 




The inscripticn on ihe cuy reads: "PreBented lo Fimuie 
Chase Staton, by the Women of East Carolina in appre- 
ciation of lier fourteen years of loving and loyal service 
as President of the Woman's Auxiliary and Parochial 
Society." It was given Mrs. Staton upon the occasion 
of her retirement from this office at the last diocesan 
Convention. 



COMPENSATIONS. 



The optimist is always looking for compensations, and 
consistently finds them. If Pollyanna had owned a middle 
name it would have been optimisia. There usually is a 
compensation if one looks for it, such as the plumage of 
the blue jay when contrasted with his note; or the voice 
of an artist whose physical defects were quite noticeable. 
Some one recently made note of the vei'y limited nature 
of the feminine vocabulary as compared with the masculine. 
"Possibly so," was the reply, "but think of the turnover." 

There is naturally much regret attached to the inability 
of the Church Building Fund to meet the requests of all 
applicants for loans, because its resources are already 
fully loaned to the Church. But there is a very gratifying 
compensation in the fact that in the presence of unavoidable 
limitations it could, as the normal year's work of 1925, 
lend $110,000, and give away $31,000, completing thus, 68 
Church buildings. These details will be amplified in the 
published Year Book of the Commission which will shortly 
be given wide distribution. Church people should read it 
carefully, and remembering that the larger the Fund, the 
greater the compensation to the Church, increase this Fund 
to One Million Dollars in 1926. 



The parish house of St. Paul's, Edenton, is nearing 
completion, and will be opened for use at an early date. 
Designed by Hobart Upjohn, the celebrated Church archi- 
tect, it is an architectural gem, and it is admirably suited 
to the needs of the Parish. 



The women of St. John's, Fayetteville, have sent out an 
urgent invitation to tlie women of East Carolina to attena 
tue Educational Institute, which is to be conducted by Miss 
Eaura F. Boyer. They ask that delegates be sent from every 
parish and mission. 

PROGRAM. 

MONDAY NIGHT— MAY 3RD. 

Registration of Delegates. 

opening cervice — Adaress, by Rev. J. B. W. Cook. 

Preliminary Talk by Miss Boyer. 

TUESDAY— MAY 4TH. FIRS'T SESSION. 
10:3Uirll:3u — Conference on Educational Methods. 
11:30-12:30 — Demonstration, Eatin American Text Book. 



2:30-3:30- 
3:30-4:30- 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON: 

-The Discussion Method. 

-Demonstration, Latin American Text Book. 

TUESDAY NIGHT. 



First Hour — ^Promotion and Organization of Classes, 
cecond Hour — Demonstration, Latin American Text E'ook. 



AN IMPORTANT RESOLUTION BY EXECUTIVE 
COUNCIL. 



At a meeting of the Executive Council, held on January 
2&th, the following resolution was adopted: 

■Resolved, That without entering into a definite contract 
for all time, it will in general be the policy of the Execu- 
tive Council, where a parish or mission increases the 
salary of its minister, to decrease the appropriation towards 
the support of said minister from the missionary funds, 
by not more than 50 per cent of the local increase in salary." 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE RECEIVES LARGE GIFT. 



The Thompson Orphanage received large benefactions 
from Mr. VV. H'. Williamson, a generous Churchman of 
Raleigh and Charlotte, during his life time, and at his 
death he remembered it in a handsome way. Mr. Wil- 
liamson died recently, and when his will was read it was 
discovered that he had left the Orphanage a legacy of 
$40,000, the income to be used for maintenance. 

This gift comes to the Orphanage at exactly the right 
time, as the recent expansion of the plant has increased 
the cost of maintenance. 



GENEROSITY INVITED. 



The following resolution was passed at the Con- 
vention: 

Resolved, that the following be printed in each 
issue of the Mission Herald: 

"In case anyone has already given his full and 
liberal share towards the apportionment of his Parish 
and yet desires to make a further contribution to- 
wards the diocesan or national program, the Con- 
vention urges that such a one should send his further 
contribution directly to the diocesan or national 
treasurer respectively marked 'individual', to be 
credited in the former case to the Diocese but not to 
the Parish, and in the latter case to the national 
program, but not to the Diocese." 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



11 



NEWS OF CHRIST CHURCH, NEW BERN. 



(Items from Christ Church Tidings.) 
Lent is past, but its memories are still clear and dis- 
tinct. The services were carried through and were most 
helpful. The Church was open for public worship every 
day but Saturday, and the afternoon services in particular 
were well attended. The Children's Services on Thursday 
afternoons were bright and cheerful, and their value em- 
phasized by the group of girls who formed the Junior 
Choir, under the care of Mrs. Leinster Duffy. The Wed- 
nesday evening course of lectures on the doctrinal teach- 
ing of the Rubrics, gave opportunities to learn of the 
manner in which our present-day customs came into being 
in this Church. Altogether, it may be said that our Lent 
was a large factor in making possible the delightful 
Easter which is now history in the Parish. The offerings 
at the Children's S'ervices. were added to the Sunday 
S'chool Lenten Offering, find helped to make up the large 
amount given by the childj-en. 



PALM S-UNDAY. 
The services on Palm Sunday were very well attended, 
and the Chancel was delightfully decorated by the Altar 
Guild with native palms. The white palms and the palm 
crosses which were worn by the Choir, were the gift of 
Mrs. B. R. Morris, and grateful acknowledgment of her 
courtesy is hereby made. 



GIFTS. 
Three gifts have been made to the Church. A new .M'-ar 
Service Book has been presented by Mr. E. K. K-'slio,): 
the new Chancel Prayer Book and H'ymnal has been pre- 
sented by Mr H. J. Lovick; and a beautiful set of two 
Silver-mounted Cruets for the Communion Service has 
been given by Mrs. Oscar A. Kafer, in memory of her 
mother, Mrs. Mary Jones Gibbs. These gifts are all in 
constant use, and greatly appreciated not only by the 
Rector, but by the congregation as well. 



CHOIR. 

T^e h!ird work which the Choir has been doing in re- 
hpRT-R"!'?. under the direction of Professor Prunier, was 
i^roup-ht to fruition in the Easter service. From all sides 
Irivp ''ome e'^nressions of commendation as the congrega- 
tion h^s spoken of the heln to a reverent worship of the 
Pisen Christ, given by the Choir. Mrs. John Guion sang 
the solo part with deep feeling and in excellent voice. 
We are all proud of the Choir! 



WHAT THE GENERAL CONVENTION THOUGHT OF 
RURAL WORK. 



The following resolutions, emphasizing the importance 
of rural work, were passed by the two houses of the 
General Convention in New Orleans. 

"The House of Deputies sent the following message to 
the House of Bishops: 

"Resolved, the House of Bishops concurring, that Gen- 
eral Convention calls the attention of the whole Church 
to the nationwide importance of the work of the Church 
in Rural S'ections, that the Church may more successfully 
labour to plant the Kingdom of God in our Rural Fields, 
and be it further 

"Resolved, the House of E'ishops concurring, that this 
General Convention urge upon all diocesan authorities the 
'fundamental value of 

1. Spreading the Church in rural America; 

2. Promoting the prestige of rural Church work. 

3. Establishing and holding diocesan, regional and na- 
tional conferences for rural clergy. 

4. Raising the standard for salaries for rural clergy. 



5. Placing rural work training courses in the curricula 
of our seminary; 

"And be it further Resolved, The House of Bishops con- 
curring, that General Convention recommends to the 
provinces that they consider the advisability of establish- 
ing rural-work commissions. 

"The House of Bishops concurred with the House oi 
Deputies." 



WOMEN OF ST. PETERS, WASHINGTON, MAVE 
LENTEN STUDY CLASS. 



STUDIES IN LIFE OF CHRIST PROVE INTERESTING. 



Our Woman's Auxiliary has had an intensely interesting 
I enten Study Class with two of the sessions before and 
the others each Monday during Lent. Following a sugges- 
tion by Mrs. J. G. Staton, we used rs a Guide Book Miss 
Grace Lindley's "Studies in the Gospel Revelation." — eight 
sessions, covering the whole subject of our dear S'aviour's 
life, ending with the final Revelation, and emphasizing 
our privilege to carry "His Revelation" to those who need 
Him. The eight members of the Auxiliary who took the 
chapters conducted these lessons in the way they felt they 
were best able to interpret Christ's glorious life, to make 
the scenes where He lived real to their hearers, and to 
depict his fearful suffering, death, and final Resurrection. 

Those who conducted those sessions, with an attendance 
each time of about forty women — -all so vitally interested — 
were as follows with the subjects each so conscientiously 
treated: 

I. The Advent — Mrs. Guy Small. 

II. From the opening of the Public Ministry to the call 
of the Twelve — Mrs. Jarl Bowers. 

III. From Call of the Twelve to the sending out of the 
Twelve, Mrs. J. D. Grimes. 

IV. From the Sending out of the Twelve to the Final 
Departure from Galilee, Mrs Victor Shelburne. 

Accompanying this was a paper on the "Death of .lohn 
the Paptist", written and read by '^Trs Frank Bowers. 

V On the Way to. .Jerusalem, Mrs. E. P. Martin. 

VI. First Days of Holy Week, Mrs. Will Hording. 

VIT. Last Days of Holy Week. Mrs. J. W. Charles. 

VIIT. Our Relation to the Revelation. Mrs. H. M. Btonner 

We were able to make this Study of Christ nuite com- 
plete by using Miss Lindley's little' pamphlet to show us 
what to emphasize: by using the four gospels: Matthew, 
Mark, Luke and John, as our text book; and with some 
outside collateral reading Little poems and prayers were 
given also, and a beautiful Pastoral Interpretation of the 
twenty-third Psalm written by Rev. W. A. Knight explain- 
ed to us how our "dear Lord was the perfect Shepherd." 
Colored pictures helped to vivify these Bible S'cenes and 
characters. 

The papers were so clear, so vivid, so carefully nrenared, 
that as one member expressed it: "Through the help of 
those study papers we have understood so much betteY 
the sermons based upon them." 

It seems to be the general opinion that this has been 
the most wonderful Lenten Study that we have ever shared 
in. Our beautiful church was a fitting h-ickground for our 
meetings. L, B. SMALL, Secretary. 



MISS VENETIA COX REGAINS HEALTH. 



Friends in the Diocese will rejoice to learn th^t later 
news received by the family from Miss Venetia Cox. our 
missionary in China, is to the effect that she has recovered 
from a severe case of pleurisy, following influenza. Her 
parents, Dr. and Mrs. D. T. Cox, of Winterville, have re- 
ceived many assurances of the esteem in which their 
daughter is held. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



AN APPRECIATION. 



MRS. E. E. COX. 

TRIBUTE OF A REMARKABLE WOMAN, WRITTEN 
BY A LOVED ONE. 



On Pebnuwy 24th, the gentle spirit of Mrs. E E. Cox, 
of Raleigh, passed into eternal peace and man^' East Caro- 
lina homes were saddened at the loss of this wonderful 
Church-worker, mother and friend. 

The eldest daughter of W. H. and Mrs. MaryNelson Smith 
(known as the apcstle of education in Pitt County) the 
subje-^'t of this sket'h was there carefully reared. At seven- 
teen, she married Mr. Calvin Cox. Clerk of the Court in 
Greenville, N. C. a man of sterling worth. Never was there 
a day when every one in the house did not gather at the 
family altar for prayers. Never was the bed-time hymn of 
praise omitted, never a S'unday when the Church catechism 
was forgotten. 

Left a widow in 1890. with four children under ten years 
of age, Mrs Cox dedicated her life anew to her eight boys 
and girls. They must be trained for service in the world. 
Those were days of financial depression and there was only 
p. small farm to depend upon, yet the older children worked 
tremendously and there was a mother that believed with 
Browning when 

"God's in His heaven 
All's right with the world." 

Mrs. Co.k's buoyant joy in living, no matter how stren- 
uous her task, was an inspiration to all with whom she 
came in contact. Never was there a day on that farm 
so busy but those children heard a song from their mother's 
lips. To her and her flock, being busy meant being joyful. 
There was Christianity in that home, and it was not of the 
long-faced kind either! Naturally her home was the gather- 
ing place for the young people of the neighborhood. 
The "E'ig Sister" in her own family, was the same to every 
one outside as well. 

Mrs. Cox loved her Church. She had toiled for its exist- 
ence, often times in stony soil, but she was satisfied to care 
for the seed, and to trust God for their growth 

This servant of God was spared great infirmity. She 
had prayed she might serve to the end. When her friends 
gathered to perform for her the last sad rites, over there 
was a garment she had begun the day before, on the table 
wpre the fet loaves baked by her own hand, and the dishes 
si loved so well to prepare. Truly another of her prayers 
wtis answered! 

It was a beautiful service, when two minister sons, gath- 
ered at the church their grandmother built St. Luke's. 
AVinterville. to repeat the final words of commitment for 
her they held so dear. Those were there whom she had 
loved and befriended, the rich and the poor, to pay their 
list homage. With the many exquisite floral designs were 
mingled the home-grown modest flowers of several one-time 
neighbors. 

Three sons survive, the Rev. Wm. E. Cox, of Richmond, 
Rev. H. G. Cox, of Newport News, Va., and Mr. C. T. Cox. 
nn active worker in Christ Church parish, Raleigh, Mrs. 
M. W. ITzzell of Chapel Hill. Mrs. A. T. Uzzell of Seven 
Snrings, Mrs. E. L. McCormac. Raleigh, Miss Huldah Cox, 
R. N. an active leader in the Health Department of Dur- 
ham are the daughters 

Though only 73, Mrs. Cox left four great grand-children, 
the children of Mrs. George Pat. ;( :c. of Goldsboro May they 
nass on to future citizens the ideal of the ".Joyful Ch:i.-s- 
tian" as this consecrated ancestor had held \ii) for her gen 
eration! 



(Uiurch, at the last meeting of that body, has received 
much favorable comment. This action was taken when 
it was seen that the National Council had to retrench. 
This amount has been used for missionary work in the 
Diocese. 



i:F INGERSOLL and VOLTAIRE could KNOW! 



The interesting discovery has just been made that Rt. 
Rev. John Gardner Murray, D.D., the Presiding Bishop 
of the Episcopal Church, removing from Baltimore to a 
temporary home In New York, has established himself in 
a Gramercy Park apartment hotel which is built on fhe 
site of the former' home of Col. Robert G. Ingersoll, the fa- 
mous atheist. 

This incident recalls how Voltaire, the French philoso- 
pher and atheist, being in exile in Geneva, wrote on one 
occasion that "one hundred years hence the Bible and the 
Christian religion will be but a memory." 

One hundred years later the Executive Board of 'he 
International Bible Society, which had in the meantime 
taken over Voltaire's house as headquarters, met in the 
same room in which he had written his prediction. It was 
piled high on all sides with Bibles in fifty-two different 
languages 



BISHOP JOHNSON SAYS. 



If Jack Dempsey received half a million a year for skill 
in handling his fists; if Charlie Chaplain received a quart3r 
of a million for skill in manipulating his face; if Pade- 
rewski receives $100,000 a year for skill in playing h 
piano; if President Coolidge receives $75,000 a year for 
skill in running the State; if the Surgeon General of the 
United States receives $15,000 a year for skill in treating 
the sick, and if the Chief Justice receives $12,000 for skill 
in dealing with the morals of the nation and the Chaplain 
General receives $4,000 for skill in spiritual leadership, 
we get something of an estimate of values as expressed in 
the world's standard of values which is money. 

If a Christian lady spends ten thousand a year in dress 
and one thousand in charity you get another cross section 
of values. 

If a Christian gentleman spends one hundred dollars 
a week at the club and puts one dollar in the plate on Sun- 
day, here too is a cash register of values. — The Witness,. 



THE U. T. O. 



The total amount of the United Thank Offering fro.m 
the Women of the Church through the Woman's Auxiliary, 
announced at the Audubon Park mass meeting on the even- 
ing of October 8th, was $904,514.77. 

The diocese giving the largest amount was Pennsylvania, 
it being $85,000. 

New York gave $75,542.93. 

Massochusetts gave $46,806.44. 

Central New York gave $30,120.12. 

Chicago gave $28,506.15. 

Western New York gave $27,207.86. 

Louisiana gave $13,818.61. 



East Carolina's action in voluntarily relimnishing an 
appropriation of $1,300 from the National Council of the 



fJrcal ]!rei)aration is being made this year for the cele- 
l.ration of Virginia Dare Day, on Roanoke Island, in .\u- 
gust. Sir Esnie Howard. British Ambassador to the 
United States, has jiromised to speal< on this occasion. 
The press of eastern North Carolina is .giving much pub- 
licity to the proposed celebration. Bishop Cheshire is 
president of the Roanoke Colony Association, and Dr. 
Drane is secretary. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



IS 



BENEFITS WHICH WE DERIVE FROM THE BLUE BOX. 



Read by Mrs. J. W. H'eyes at the Pitt County Group 
Meeting in Greenville on January 15th. 



The Blue E'ox is likely to be so often looked upon as one 
more thing which calls for money. Looked upon in this 
light it is placed in the budget of one's giving to the Church. 
If I am a tither, I shall count that which I put in the box 
as a portion of my tithe. If I am not a tither, I shall, at 
the end of the year, count up the amounts I have put in my 
Bex and add them to the other givings, such as support of 
Parish and General Church and assume that it reprebents 
my giving for the year. 

Again, if I am in the habit of bringing out my Blue Box 
a few days before the treasurer calls for it, and put in it 
so much change or a bill I shall be defeating the purpose 
of the L'ox They rob me of certain definite benefits which 
are meant for me to derive and to enjoy. The Blue Box does 
not belong in either my Church budget or my tithing. 
That must be thoroughly understood by me before I can 
be said to understand the elementary principles of the place 
of the Blue Box in my life as a communicant of the Church 
and a child of God. The E'ox is one financial source of the 
Church's missionary work which is not a strictly business 
proposition in the life of the communicant. No one is 
expected to have a certain or given amount in her Box. 

The Blue Box might be more appropriately named "The 
Thankful Box." I say this because its creation came about 
due to the need for an avenue, or medium, through which 
we might express, in a material way, the feeling of Thank- 
fulness for happenings or conditions which arrive in an 
individual's life. Its creation is the answer to the ques- 
tion: How can I say "thank you" and show that I mean it? 

"Do you give thanks for this or that? 
No! God be thanked, I am not grateful 
In that cold, calculating way, with blessings ranked 
As one two, three and four, — that would be hateful!" 

Life has in it too much of the mechanical and too little 
of the real. This has a serious influence on our apprecia- 
tion of the blessings which come to us through no con- 
scious effort of our own. We say "thank you", but a thank- 
fulness that fails to show itself in action, an appreciation 
which expresses itself only in polite phrases is, I fear, far 
from the Kingdom of Heaven. A woman is known by her 
behaviour, or outward conduct, equally so is this true of 
disposition. 

My appreciation, in order for it to have any bearing on 
my spiritual condition, must be disposed to act or my words 
are a sounding brass and a tinkling cymbal. Go over in 
your mind, the number of times you have said "thank you" 
and analyze the reflexive goodness which has come from 
these repeated expressions. Now go over in your mind 
the times you have expressed your gratitude materially and 
contrast the reflexive values One is largely words; the 
other is action with the will behind the action. 

Now the E'lue Box exists for the very purpose of giving 
a meaning to my expression of "Thank You!" In this sense 
there is a benefit which I derive that is far beyond the 
feeling that my money helps in the maintenance of a mis- 
sionary. The missionary is merely accidental: she has 
come about as a result of my expression in terms of money. 
I did not put my money in the Thankful Box because of 
a missionary, I put it there because it is the sacred con- 
tainer for my thanks. It makes no real difference whether 
the money is used for the salary of a school teacher in 
Alaska or for the nursing of a sick lady in China. All this 
I leave with those in Christ's Church who have the wisdom, 
knowledge and authority to dispense it as they deem wisest. 

Because my Thankful Box is not primarily the financial 
reservoir out of which some one takes so many pennies. 



nickles and dimes, I find that it has another influence over 
my life whi'h will i)rcve of boundless value if I will abide 
ly its inferred tea< hings. I am human, and because I am 
human 1 am always thinking of the things which I do not 
have, and am constantly forgetting the unearned blessings 
V, liich I experienre. Now the very fact that I one day put 
a material exin'ession in my Thankful F.'ox will have so im- 
1 li ntcd in my mind the realization of what I have as to 
c Hise me to halt in my tendency towards covetuousness. 
W'culd you know a cure for youi' temptation to break the 
tenth f cmmandn;ent, "Thou shalt not covet"? then place 
ycur Th; nkful Bex where you can see it. You will find it 
serving as a reminder of tlicse many blessings which you 
pre enjoying, and are likely to enjoy. If your Box has been 
rightly used, there will be stored up in it memories of 
gcod crops, sins forgiven, bruises that are healed, misun- 
dtr.'tandings made clear as the noon-day, healthy children 
mir-^'ulcusly s?ved from a premature death, improved living 
(cnditlons, changes from the farm to the conveniences of 
city life, clothes which you one time thought beyond your 
reach, automobiles instead of buggies and mules, roads 
rlorg which ycu fe?red by either day cr night at this season 
of the year now changed to boulevards, the fieedom of 
wom^^n, ccmfcrtable churches well cared for, three clergy- 
men in Pitt county where once you had cne, — with all these, 
and other blessings; of which only we and God know, how 
d".re we sliow thanklessness? How dare we be unduly 
rnxious for the morrow? How can we covet? Take, th^n, 
the Thankful Box seriously. Let it have one use, and only 
one, in your life — a receptacle for thanks. 

As a mother, my maternal affections would be but poorly 
rovepled if I did ncthing more than caress and kiss my 
children My affections are proved most real in the stitches 
which ,go into the dresses .in the night watches through 
which I have gone and in the efforts I have made to keep 
them clean and healthy. As a Christian, my appreciation 
of my Saviour and of the Father Who so loved the world 
as to send the Saviour demands some better way than 
words. And one way which is superior to words is my 
"Thankful Box". 



BISHOP DARST TO MAKE MANY ADDRESSES ON 
EVANGELISM. 



(News Item in Wilmington Dispatch.) 

I'ishop Thomas C. Darst, of the East Carolina Diocese, 
besides heading the general campaign of the national 
commission on evangelism of. the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, has now been named chairman of a sub-commit- 
tee to deal with diocesan organization and preparations 
for the bishops crusade. 

The campaign will be the greatest spiritual undertaking 
in the history of the church. It will be waged in every 
diocese in America and in other lands where the Ameri- 
can church has a footing 

Bishop Darst will speak at a meeting of the S'ynod of 
(he Pacific at Long Beach, Cal., in May, and will stop at 
a number of large cities en route home from the west to 
address meetings of clergy and laity. 

The drive will be intensive and thorough. Practically 
every bishop and clergyman in the nation and thousands 
cf representative laymen will take part. The movement 
is understood to have been suggested by Bishop Darst, 
who has become a leading figure in the church in America 
in recent years. His services as a preacher will be in 
great demand during the several months of the cam- 
paign. 

In addition to Bishop Darst, the members of the sub- 
committee are: Bishops Freeman and Oldham; Rev. Messrs. 
John S. L'unting, A. J. Gammack and G, R. B. MacDonald; 
Messrs. Samuel Thorne and John Stewart Bryan. 



14 



THE MISSION HEKALi). 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE AND TRAINING INSTITU- 
TION, CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Contributions from the Diocese of East Carolina from 
February 24 to March 24. 

CAS'H. 

Wilmington, Miss Wilhelmina Harlow $ 3.00 

Belhaven, St, James' 3. 00 

Belhaven, Rev. J. N. Bynum 50.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 06 

Merry Hill, Emily, Richard and Whitmell Smithwick 1.00 

IN KIND. 

Wilminglon, St. John's Church School — Box of groceries 
and provisions. 

Wilmington, H. C. McQueen — 5 issues of the "Youth's 
Companion." 

MARCH AT THE ORPHANAGE. 

On Wednesday afternoon during Lent the girls of Mrs. 
Burwell's S'unday School Class at St. Peter's Church have 
invited diftereut groups of girls of the Orphanage to tneir 
homes to become belter acquainted. This has been a splen- 
did thing tor our girls and has given them all a great deal 
of pleasure. 

The children art; all jubilant over the fact that on Mid- 
Lent Sunday they passed their Lenten mite box quota of 
$40.00 and on the following Sunday the announcement was 
made that the offering had reached the goodly sum of 
$62.98. This has largely been made possible through the 
sale of copies of the "Spirit of Missions", but chiefly 
through the money earned by an act of self-denial in giv- 
ing up a weekly treat of ice cream given them by a very 
good friend in Winston-Salem. 

Three fine new pieces of playground equipment, an ocean 
wave, six swings and a bumper slide, the gift of St. Peter's 
Service League, have recently been installed on the campus 
and so thoroughly enjoyed, that in the case of the first 
mentioned the children have had all of the sensations of a 
real ocean voyage including mal de mer. 

A meeting of the Building Committee was recently held 
ana the plans for the administration building thoroughly 
discussed and the architect authorized to secure bids on 
same. 

The Young People's Fellowship of St. Martin's Church has 
been doing a good deal for the children this Lent, taking 
the children for automobile rides and twenty-five of the 
boys one Saturday for an all day hike with all kinds of 
good things to eat. They also contributed about seventy- 
five splendid books lo the Orphanage library, and the other 
girls have come over in the afternoons to play games with 
the children, especially those of the Osborne baby cottage. 

Sunday afternoon, March 21st, the Epworth orchestra 
gave a fine concert for the children and played a number 
of the old hymns which the children enjoyed singing. 

A very helpful event of the month was the visit on Mon- 
day, March fifteenth, of Dr. Hastings H. Hart of the Rus- 
sell Sage Foundation of New York City. Dr. Hart is con- 
ceded to be the greatest authority on the care of dependent 
children in the country today. Dr. Hart thoroughly inspect- 
ed the buildings and gave many helpful suggestions, em- 
bodying the best and latest expression of social practice 
in the care and training of dependent children. 

Mrs. Laura K. Poague, of Washington, D. C, has been 
serving most acceptably as substitute matron for Miss Lou 
H'ill at the Kenan Cottage. Mrs. Poague thoroughly under- 
stands and loves children and the children all love her 
and have responded wonderfully to her motherly care. 

The death of Mr. William H. Ruffln, of Louisburg, for 
many years a valued member of the Board of Managers 
and a staunch friend of the children, causes genuine grief 
to all at the Orphanage. Among the many thoughtful 



things which Mr. Ruffin was constantly doing for the Or- 
phanage was the custom of contributing a percentage of his 
income every mouth to the maintenance fund. The loving 
sympathy and heart felt prayers of the children are ex- 
i ended to all members of his family. 



SEWANEE SUMMER SCHOOL OPENS JULY 27TH. 



E-OTH ADULT AND YOUNG PEOPLES' DIVISIONS HAVE 
GOOD PROGRAM. 

The S'ummer Training School for Workers, Sewanee, 
Tennessee, will be held this year at Sewanee from July 27 
to August 25. The Young People's Division will be from 
Tuesday, July 27, at supper to Tuesday, August 11, at 
breakfast. The Adult Division will be held from Wednes- 
day, August 11, until August 25, after dinner. The School 
of the Prophets will be held at the same time as the Adult 
Li vision. 

The Young Peoples Divisions will be in charge of Bishop 
Quin, of Texas, assisted by the Rev. Karl E'lock and others. 
The Adult Division will be in charge of Bishop Green, 
Cctidjutor of Mississippi, with the Rev. Dr. G. L. Tucker 
as Dean of the Department of Religious Education, the Rev. 
Dr. Loring Clark as Dean of the Department of Missions, the 
Rsv. Lr. H. W. S'tarr as Dean of the Department of Chris- 
lian Social iJervice, and Mrs. J. R. Wheeler la - harge of 
Woman's Organizations. In each of these leiiaiLments 
there will be instructors peculiarly suited to the subjects 
fr signed. The t'thool of the Piophets will be i?i cra'.ge of 
r.fchop Bra'' ten of Mississippi, assisted by a repi-osontative 
of tne Commission on Evangelism, and there will be lectur- 
ers on courses of interest to the clergy. We will have at the 
school, Mr. Lewis B. Franklin, Dr. John VV. Wood, .Miss 
Mabel Lee Cooper, and others, and also leoresentatives 
from the various organizations of the Church. 

Miss Gladys M. Fry, who has been the Executive Secre- 
tary has resigned from that position, and Miss Emma 
Twiggs of Savannah, Georgia, has been appointed, .\nyone 
desiring information, or who may desire to attend vhe 
&'ummer School may address Miss Emma Twiggs, Christ 
Church Parish House, 221 East Congress Street, Savannah, 
Georgia. 



SUMMER SCHOOL AT VALLE CRUCIS. 

At the recent meeting of the Diocesan Executive Council 
it was decided to join the other Carolina dioceses by ap- 
propriating $100.00 each to this school. It is greatly to be 
desired that as many as possible of our Clergy and other 
teachers should begin to arrange now to go to a Summer 
School. Many of the people from this diocese have in the 
past attended the excellent School at Sewanee, and it is 
desirable that they should continue to do so. Valle Crucis 
is in our own State and is easy of access by good roads 
by way of Asheville. An automobile party could drive there 
with small expense. The Registration Fee is $2.50 and the 
charge for board and room for the whole session is $17.50. 
A pleasant vacation can be combined with profitable study. 
The dates for this year are July 5th to 17th. The full 
faculty will be announced later, but already several able 
members have been secured. I would suggest that it would 
amply repay any Parish to supply all, or a part of, the 
funds that would secure the attendance of one or more of 
their teachers at a S'ummer School. Those who go there 
will be more efficient and they will bring back inspiration 
to do better work to all the other teachers. 

The Valle Crucis School is under the direction of a board 
consisting of one director from each of the five dioceses. 
E'nshop Darst has appointed me as Director from East Caro- 
lina. I shall be glad to give any information, but the best 
source for facts and programs is the Rev. J. W. Cantey 
Johnson, Gastonia, N. C, who with the Rev. W. H. K. 
Pendleton, of Spartanburg, S. C, are the actual guiding 
spirit of the school. GEORGE W. LAY. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



15 



Young People's Department. 



Miss Elizabeth Moore, Editor of Department. 



YOUNG PEOPLES' DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. Aubrey Parsley, president of the dioresnn organi- 
zation of the Young Peoples' Service League, h-^s sent to 
all of the Leagues a copy of the report of the first meet 
ing of the National Young People's Commission in New 
York on January 22nd The report contains' many recom- 
mendations that are of interest. 



A SUGGESTED HYMN FOR MEETINGS 

Tune: "Just As I Am." 

"Just as I am young, strong and free. 
To be the best that I can be 
For God, and righteousness and Thee, 
O Jesus Christ, I Come, I Come. 
Out in the world to win renown. 
And then take the victor's crown. 
And at Thy feet to lay it down. 
Lord of my life, I come to Thee." 



STATEMENT FROM MIS'S GAITHER. 

During Lent the Leagues turned their energies towards 
raising funds for the mite boxes, consequently payments 
on the assessments have fallen off. These payments have 
been due such a long time that I earnestly hope each 
S'ervice League will pay its full assessment promptly. 

Be of service to your League and see that your Service 
League is paid up. Faithfully yours, 

LOUISE GAITHER, Treasurer. 



The American Library Association has requested a re- 
port of Church Periodical Club's library activities, anoth- 
er national recognition of this Church agency of which, 
alas, some Church people know nothing. 



In Virginia the Brunswick County jail stands empty 
six months at a time, in spite of the fact that that county 
has the largest proportion of I^egro population. A "white" 
newspaper says this is due in no small measure to the 
influence of Archdeacon Russell of St. Paul's, one of the 
eleven schools under the American Chiirch Institute for 
Negroes. 



The Pishop of London, who is coming to see us in the 
autumn, has a new motor car, a present from his diocese, 
replacing a car that had been in use for sixteen years. 
Rocky Mountain Fords take note. The new car's first 
trip was to Buckingham Palace, where the Bishop of Lon- 
don preached to the King and Queen, and their Majesties 
saw and admired the new car. Granted all this is not 
news, but isn't it pleasant! 



The Hotel Goldsboro 

Modern— Fire Proof. GOLDSBORO, N. C. 

l VANSTORY Inc., LE'^SEE 

^ J. C. VANSTORY J. C. WILLIAMS, 

President Vice-Pres. & Treas. 



^ 



A NOVEL PROGRAM. 

St. James' League at Macon, Georgia, furnished the most 
novel program for the Conference of the Diocese of Georgia 
pnd Atl'inta held recently in S'avannab. As one can see, it is 
in the form of a cross-word puzzle. Although the design must 
be surveyed v>'ith some artistic license, the puzzle is carefully 
V, cried cut and assures an interesting evening session. Tn 
order not to spoil it, we are saving the key for the next week. 




Cross Word Puzzle Definitions: 
Horizontal — 

1. Stand for the Bible. 

2. E'iack Robe worn by Choir. 

3. Name of first Wednesday in Lent. 

4. Sign of a degree. 

.5. Music sung by Choir during receiving of alms 

6. The greatest Feast Day of the Church, 

7. The Communion Cup. 

8. A familiar symbol meaning "Jesus Saviour of Men.' 

9. Seats in the Church. 

10. White Robe worn by Choir. 

11. Chi Rho (Greek) 

12. Money received during a Service. 

13. Third Church S'eason. 

14. A form of praise. 

I.'i. The forty days before Easter. 

16. Black robe worn by a Bishop. 

17. Ruling body of men in a Church. 

18. White Robe worn by a Minister. 

19. Ornamentation back of the Altar. 
Vertical — 

1. A General Supplication. 

12. The Communion Plate. • . 

20. Shelf for the Elements. 

21. The first Church Season. 

22. The Communion Table. 

23. The head of a Diocese. 

24. The body of the Church which stands for "belief" 
2.5. Priests Altar Assistant. 

2. Church music, not a hymn. 

26. One who administers "The Lord's Supper." 

27. A minister's sign of office. 

28. "Word of God." 

29. Place of Baptism. 

30. Elevated portion of the Church proper. 

31. Cross bearer. 

32. Container for Purificators. 

33. Communion Wine container. 
14. Reverent. 

34. The portion of the Church within the Altar Rail. 

35. White Robe worn by a Bishop. 

36. S'o be it. 

37. Place from which Sermons are delivered. 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



OWN A SUMMER HOME at CAROLINA BEACH 

Carolina Beach is on the Main I^and. A Beach that you can drive your Automobile to the Water's edge, 
A good hard road from Wilmington. A new modern hotel now under construction that will he completed 
for the season of 1926. Lots are sold on reasonable terms and as an investment they are ideal. Informa- 
tion gladly given. Call or write any authorized representative. 

CAROLINA BEACH CORPORATION 

OWNERS AA'D DEVELOPERS OF 



CAROLINA BEACH 



Offices at CAROLINA. BEACH, N. C. 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WWSTON- SALEM- N. 0. 



OFFICERS: — S. C. Ogburn, President; W. F. S'chaffner, Vice-President; W. W. Walsh, Vice-President; 

E. P. Yates, Vice-President; B. D. Turner, Secretary-Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS: S. C. Ogburn, S. C. Clark, A. V. Nash, W. F. Shaffner, E. P. Yates, E. D. Turner,W. W. Walsh 
J. L. BECTON, C. E., Wilmington, N. C. Engineer in charge of development. 
REFERENCES: Any Bank or Mercantile Agency. 






Nor folk= Southern Railroad 

Train departures from Plymouth, N. C. 

Subject to change, schedule not guaranteed. 
DAILY 

Leave 2:30 P. M. — Raleigh, New Bern, Beaufort, 
Goldsboro and intermediate points. Parlor car to 
New Bern. 

Leave 12:26 A. M.— Raleigh, New Bern, Beaufort, 
Goldsboro, Charlotte, Fayetteville and intermediate 
points. Sleepers to Raleigh and New Bern. 

Leave 12:30 P. M. — Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Parlor Car. 

Levae 4:00 A. M. — Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Sleeping Car. Yours very truly, 

J. F. DALTON, General Pass. Agent 



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VOL. XL. 



No. 5 





lissinn 







ira-tt):at*l)rarrtf)$ayc0mflReu22:i7 




OF THE UTMOST IMPORTANCE 

Convention of the Young Peo= 
pie of the Diocese of East Caro= 
lina in St. Peter's Church, Wash= 
ton, N. C, June 14 and 15. See 
copy of program within. 

Inter-Diocesan Conference on 
Evangelism, St. Mary's School, 
Raleigh, N, C, June 8th and 9th. 

News item and program in 
this issue. 





/Iftav, 1926 



Published by the Diocese of East Carolina at Plymouth, N. C. 



o 



\J 



A 



O 



V 



A 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



uaint 9//ary'<^ uchool^ 

A JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Rev. WARREN W. WAY, Rector. 

An Episcopal School for Girls. Four years High School and two 
years College Courses. Accredited. Special courses: Music, Art, 
Expression, Home Economics, Business. 

MODERN EQUIPMENT— 20 ACRE CAMPUS. 

Advent session opens Sept. 15, 1925. For catalogue address: 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager, Raleigh N. C. 

^Jjeau/ort, >J\. C 






An elementary and preparatory school for hoys and girls 
Lovely location on coast of North Carolina; healthful cli- 
mate; comfortable room's; wholesome food; daily prayer; 
preparation for college; athletics; piano; band and orchestra — 
— a home atmosphere fostered. 
Accommodation for 50 boarders. 

For further information apply to, 

MR. E. F. DUNCAN, Principal. 



-^^ -'^ — ^ — '^'-^::^^Q ^-'^~- 



o^^^ 



Two Books You Should Buy Now 



1. Bishop William Temple's "Personal Religion and the Life of 
Fellowship." This is the book recommended to the jieople of the 
Church for Lenten leading by the Bishop of London. 

2. The Rev. Dr. W. C. Bell's, "Sharing In Creation." This is a 
book that will appeal to laymen who wish to learn how the results 
of modern ^scholarship contribute to the substance of the Chrisitan 
faith. 

Order now through the Mission Herald. 

Write the REV. TH'EODORE PARTRICK, JR., 

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The Mission Herald. 



Vol. XL. 



PLYMOUTH N. C. MAY, 1926. 



No. 5 



THIS MISSIONARY DIOCESE 



SOME PERTINENT FACTS AND REFLECTIONS 



(By the REV. G. W. LAY.) 



East Carolina is in a very true sense a Missionary Dio- 
cese. Much ot its territory is stiil unexplored. In five 
of its counties we have not even a Sunday School. Most 
ot its churches are not self-supporting. A study of con- 
ditions will disclose some surpriding and thought-provoking 
facts, which should lead perhaps to new methods and new 
ehorts. 

Out of forty-two Parishes it would seem that only ten 
are served by clergy who do not receive a part of their 
support trom Diocesan Funds. These are the Parishes in 
Bdenton, Elizabeth City, Fayetteville, Greenville, Kinston, 
New Bern, Washington, and St. James', St. Johns, and St. 
Paul's in Wilmington. (The other thirty-two have the 
same rights in Convention.) Of the thirty Organized Mis- 
sions and twenty-two places listed as Unorganized only five 
appear as being so served. That is to say that in eighty- 
four per cent of the places in which services are held the 
minister is partly supported by Diocesan Funds. To put 
it in another way, out of about thirty-five Clergy, including 
the Bishop, only ten receive no stipend from the Diocese. 
These conditions have apparently been about the same for 
many years. Shall we be content to let them remain so 
much longer? 

Some things in parochial and clerical support tend to be 
static, to remain unchanged indefinitely and to be regarded 
as unchangeable. 

(1) Clerical stipends that are paid by the people served 
show no great tendency to change in an upward direction. 

(2) Missions are left to the mercy of a cold, cold world 
and the stronger Parishes show little desire to adopt and 
support these orphaned and neglected children. 

(3) Diocesan appropriations for local support are regarded 
as ordained by a tew of the Medes and Persians and the 
money therefrom is thought of as dropping down myste- 
riously and surely, like the manna of old, and only requir- 
ing to be gathered in regularly by the beneficiary. 

1. The infant is entirely dependent on others, but as 
years go on he must grow into self-support. The unfor- 
tunate for a time need help from others, but financial help, 
kindly but unwisely continued, may lead to pauperism, irre- 
s])onsibility and loss of self-respect. Absence of growth 
leads to stagnation and death. The plant that depends on 
another for support and nourishment finally becomes a 
parasite. It is a pious privilege to help the infant and the 
unfortunate, but our efforts are usually in vain, if growth 
and independence do not result. It would be well for each 
of our congregations to look back several years and see 
whether they have ma,intained that gradual increase which 
could fairly be expected of them. If any have failed in 
this, immediate plana should be made and carried out to do 
better in the immediate future. 

At about the time of the first Nation Wide Campaign 
this diocese took steps to increase the meager stipends ot 



the Clergy who were supported from diocesan funds. Sev- 
eral Parishes also helped in this by doing their part. But 
in practice what was established as the minimum has be- 
come the accepted maximum. Congregations that paid 
years ago what seemed then a fairly liberal salary nave 
not thought to increase it, because it is not bei'JW the pres- 
ent minimum and the rector has not complained. It is 
quite conceivable that the oldest and most experienced 
clergymen in the diocese might be receiviaij exactly the 
Sfuue stipend as the youngest man who has just entered 
the ministry. 

It will probably be found that the stipends paid to the 
clergy by the congregations they serve have changed very 
little in recent years, while the cost of everything else 
has greatly increased. This has resulted doubtless 
from lack of thought rather than of generosity. The Clergy 
do not and will not complain. The Daity should think alld 
act as well as vote. Few years ago the Council passed a 
resolution, unanimously of course, urging an increase in 
clerical salaries paid by Parishes and Missions. This gen- 
erous expression does not seem to have resulted in much 
action. (See St. James. 2:14-16.) Increased stipends have 
come largely from diocesan funds. It may be that a con- 
gregation that desired to give its minister a better support 
felt that any increase in their share towards his stipend 
would be met by an equal decrease from the Dio- 
cese. In order to remove this difficulty the Diocesan Coun- 
cil at its last meeting passed a resolution to the effect that, 
without binding itself for all time, the Diocese would not 
scale down its appropriation in such cases more than fifty 
per cent of the local increase. The Diocese and the Clergy- 
man would benefit fifty-fifty. 

II. Missions that ai-e now' dependent entirely on the Dio- 
cese should in many cases be adopted and supported by an 
adjacent strong parish. 

If a clergyman receives a salary from his parish and a 
diocesan stipend for a mission, the parish ought to strive 
to assume the amount of that stipend. Otherwise the parish 
is hardly self-supporting in a strict sense. They have a 
man as rector whose services they perhaps could not se- 
cure without this diocesan stipend. Further the Diocese can 
hardly begin any of the new and exploratory work that is 
sorely needed, unless it is first relieved of some of the bur- 
den still entailed by work long established. 

III. Diocesan appropriations for local support can only 
be made from money contributed by the parishes and mis- 
sions whcse fair share is indicated by an apportionment. 
The funds in the diocesan treasury are very limited in 
amount and are collected with great difficulty in many 
cases. Many urgent calls for help and new work have to 
be declined because of lack of funds. If appropriation' 
made years ago are to be regarded as fixed charges, the dio- 
cese is hampered. Those receiving the henefit of such 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



approyiiatious should couaider wlietlier it is liealihy lo 
Louiiuue to receive tlie same sum for au iudeHuile peiiou, 
whether it is quite fair to parishes that give lioerally lo tnc 
diocese while receiving nothing from it, and whether ii is 
not tneir duty to relinquish gradually this diocesan ,,iu i._ 
order that more needy places may beneflt by their act. 

ur course some will at once propose that a parish luigi.t 
cease to pay its diocesan apportionment and add that much 
to tne local salary. Arithmetically this seems very simple; 
but economically it is bad and morally it is wrong, iicouoiii- 
ically it has been shown in thousands of cases that, as a con- 
gregation gives more lo outside objects, it progresses witiiiu 
itself in greater proportion. The parish that exists 
solely in and for itself soon shrivels up and 
(Jies. Morally, we individually owe a duty lo things 
outside our own immediate interests in many ways. 
Neglect of these duties will ultimately injure our 
own characters. Each one must feel that he is a 
part of all these greater things and that he is doing his 
share in the community as well as at home. A man may 
be a good husband and father, but if he is a poor citizen, 
he will win little respect and few will miss him when he 
dies. The self-satisfied self-supporting parish that has no 
interests except its own counts for little. The struggling 
little congregation, self-supporting or npt, that is interested 
in all the world and does its little something for many out- 
side objects is as a beacon set on a hill and has an influence 
that cannot be measured in money. This is of the very 
essence of Christian doctrine and practice and of the truest 
kind of even worldly success. 



DIOCESAN OFFICERS OF WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS 
MEET IN GREENVILLE. 



MRS. MACMli^LAN AXD OTHERS MAKE INSPIRING 
ADDRESSES'. 



BISHOP DARST AND MR. NOE VISIT ST. PAUL'S, 
BEAUFORT. 



THE BISHOP HAS TO CONTEND WITH BLIZZARD. 



Sunday March 14, the people of Beaufort and Morehead 
City had the privilege and pleasure of welcoming our Bishop 
for his visitation. But outwardly he received a very cold 
reception. It was quite impossible to have the 8 A. M. Com- 
munion Service in St. Paul's Beaufort, with the streets 
covered with ice, a blizzard blowing and the heating appa- 
ratus on strike. The service at 11 A. M. was condensed 
into twenty-five rather shivery minutes, including a short 
sermon by the Bishop. By 7:30 P. M. the weather was much 
better disposed and, with the aid of sixteen oilheaters, the 
temperature in church could be imagined to be comfortable. 
At this service the Bishop preached and confirmed three 
persons. A good congregation was present, but the church 
would have been crowded if the elements had not fur- 
nished a real reason for some who usually must invent 
an excuse. 

By two o'clock the sun had melted snow and ice, the 
sidewalks were dry, and in Captain Will S'mith's comfort- 
able boat we had a really delightful sail to Morehead City 
where at 3 p. m. was held the last service in St. Andrew's 
church on its site. There was a good congregation present. 
The Bishop preached and confirmed four persons. Altogether 
it was a full day. What threatened to be dangerous to the 
health of our hard-working Bishop turned out better than 
was feared and he left on the 6:30 train next morning ap 
parently none the worse for his experience and still smiling 
and hopeful. 

The Rev. W. R. Noe, Executive Secretary of the Diocese, 
favored the parish in Beaufort with a visit on Sunday, April 
18th, preaching both morning and evening. He came in 
the interest of the Apportionment and expects to return ti: 
complete his work on May 5th. Beaufort is always glad 
to welcome him to his old home town and is proud of him 
and the other three No€ brothers and the one Gibble who 
have gone from this parish into the ministry. 



(By Mrs. W. O. S. SOUTHERLAND.) 
On Wednesday, the 14th of April, Mrs. Richard Williams, 
president of the Edenton Convocation arranged a meeting 
.11 oi. jeaul's Church, Greenville, N. C, for the \.. 
that place and the neignbcring towns to give these women 
an opportunity lo meet some of the new Diocesan officers, 
c.na aiio to give these officers the pleasure of meeiin^ ... 
l.nowing some of the women wno are so capably carrying 
on their share of the work of the church. Rev. J. E. W. 
took opened the meeting with prayers and Mrs. Williams 
prtsidetl and introduced the new officers to the womeri 
'the attendance- was splendid and everyone seemed interest- 
ed m the plan which has been mapped out for the women's 
work during the coming three years. Mrs. Henry J. Mac- 
Aiillan, cur new Diocesan President, read and briefly touch- 
ed upon The Message which she hopes will be read and 
deeply stuuied by the women of the church all over the 
t4ocese. She explained the new plan of work and made 
ihe outline very clear to everyone. 

Mrs. &'. P. Adaius spoke about the Thompson Orphanage 
and told some of its needs. She also told something about 
each item included in the Corporate Gift. This gift, which 
will amount to about $100, UOO, is to be used for the follow- 
ing items of advance work to be completed in the order 
named : 

St. Agnes' School, Kyota $25,000 00 

St. Timothy's Hospital, Cape Mount, Liberia. .. .$20,000.00 

CaiLedral, Haiti V2.j\)'>m0 

c:iiurch at Baguio, Philippine Islands. I8,u00.u0 

St Mark's School, Nenana, Alaska 1.^.000 00 

Church at Livrameuto, Brazil. o,000.0'J 

Mrs. Adams impressed upon the women the need for thef-e 
objects in their respective fields and urged them to strive 
for a little more than the $100,000 for some dioceses may 
not reach their quota. 

Mrs. James G. Staton, Diocesan United Thank Oll'eriag 
Treasurer, talked about this great work and made all the 
women feel it a joy and privilege to be able to concriouie 
even in a small way to this outstanding work and greatest 
oftering of the women of the church all over the world. She 
urged that we would keep our blue boxes ever before us, 
contribute to them regularly and systematically for surely 
all of us have something to be thankful for every day. 

Mrs. Jarl E. Bowers, Chairman of the Christian S'ocial 
Service Department, made a most inspiring address on hei 
work. One who feels so deeply interested in this particu 
lar work and who enters so whole heartedly into it cannot 
fail to make a success of it. 

Mrs Louis J. Poisson, the Diocesan Box Secretary, spoke 
upon some of the phases of this work, and Mrs. W. O. S. 
Southerland, Diocesan Publicity Chairman, explained briefly 
some of the aims of this department. 

Great thanks are due Mrs. Williams for arranging this 
meeting and all the officers left with the feeling that if 
these meetings could be held oftener and a more person •. 
relationship could he established among the officers and 
other women that even greater work could be done. 

The annual report of the Church Building Fund shows 
that during the year 1925 a gift of $1,000 was made to St. 
Andrew's Church, Wrightsville, for its parish house. A 
list of the acknowledgments for the year shows that not a 
.single church in the Diocese made a contribution. This is 
not a good showing, in view of the fact that many East 
Carolina churches have been beneficiaries of this Fund. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA. 



STATEMENT OF AMOUNTS PAID ON 4PP0RTI0N 
MENTS FOR THE CHURCH'S PROGRAM— DIO- 
CESAN AND GENERAL— TO MAY 15 1926. 



FIRST. 

Apportion- 
Location and Parish ment. 

Edentcn, St. Paul's $3000.00 

Wilmington, St. James' 11040.00 

Woodville, Grace Church.... 500.00 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 100.00 

Winterville, St. Luke's 200.00 

SECOND. 

Creswell, St. David's $ 700 . 00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 2415.00 

f'ayetteville. St. John's.. 4300.00 

Goldsboro, St. S'tephen's 1500.00 

Greenville, St. Paul's.. 2100.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 1170.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 2500.00 

New Bern, Christ Church... 4000.00 
Plymouth, Grace Church.... 1000.00 

Washington, St. Peter's 4500.00 

Wilmington, St. John's 3000.00 

Wilmington. St Paul's 1995.00 

Windsor, St. Thomas' 800.00 

THIRD. 

Ayden, St. James'.... $320.00 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 600.00 

Belhaven, St. James' 500.00 

Bonnerton, St. John's 100.00 

Clinton, St. Paul's 400.00 

Garesville, St. Mary's 250.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 200.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 350.00 

Southport, St. Philip's 250.00 

Williamstcn. Church of Advent 500.00 

Wintcn, St John's.... 200.00 

Columbia, St. .'\ndrew's 300.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 530.00 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 125.00 

Snow Hill, S't. Barnabas'..... 200.00 

W'rn-saw, Calvary 80.00 

W'hiteville, Grace Church.... 90.00 

Yeatesville St. Matthew's 100.00 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 100.00 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's. 70.00 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 60.00 

FOURTH. 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' $ 100.00 $ 

Aurora, Holy Cross.... 500.00 

Bath, S't. Thomas' 100.00 

Chocowinity, Trinity 100.00 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 200.00 

Grifton, St. John's 250.00 

Hope Mills. Clirist Church... 150.00 

Jessama, Zion 275 . 00 

Lake Landing, St. George's.. 250.00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 400.00 

Red Springs, S't Stephen's... 100.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 240.00 

Vanceboro. St. Paul's 100.00 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd.. 300.00 

Wilmington, S't. Mark's 400.00 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 150.00 

Bunyan. St. Stephen's ....... 25 . 00 

Edenton. St. .John's 1 50 . 00 ' 

Edward, Redeemer . 25.00 

Elizabeth City. St. Philip's... 50.00 

Fairfield. All S^aints' ..... 35 .00 



Paid by 


Paid by 


Parish 


Ch. School. 


$1259.76 


$ 100.00 


3172.61 






61.00 


31.32 




80.00 


26.00 


1 70.00 


$ 125.00 


750.00 




1100.00 




354.40 


61.64 


250.00 


200.00 




1 33 . 09 


25 . 00 


50.00 


700.00 


454 . 29 


1500.00 


411.86 


721.87 




417.12 


8.59 





76.70 


f 50.00 


$ 


224.89 


78.01 


148.75 


100.011 


6.20 




162.05 


52.17 




18.70 




40.00 


81.75 


45.00 


75.00 


100.00 




15.00 




50.00 


55.28 


76 . 72 




17.55 


66.00 






25.00 




35.00 


45.00 


11.49 


36.15 


6.84 


10.50 


2.15 - 




$ 




55.00 


13.50 


4.75 




14.03 


32 . 00 


20.00 


14.98 


23.40 


24 . 60 




90.00 


50.00 




12.40 


22.50 




S3 . 30 




115.12 


10.00 


2.00 




25 . 00 


1 8 . 75 


3.00 


7.00 




15.00 



Apportion- 

Location and Parish ment. 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 50.00 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 50.00 

Lumberton, Trinity 100 . 00 

.Maxton, St. Matthew's 50.00 

North West, All Souls' 50.00 

S'ladesville, St. John's 30.00 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 100.00 

Trenton, Grace Church 125.00 

Washington, St. Paul's 250.00 

Wrightsville, St Andrew's... 100.00 

Aurora, St. .lude's 100.00 

Ayden, S't. Thomas' 45.00 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 40.00 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's .. 100.00 

C.reenville, St. Andrew's 125.00 

Jasper. St. Thomas' 50.00 

Kinston, Christ Church 75.00 

-Murfreesboro. St. Barnabas'.. 50.00 

Oriental, S't. Thomas.... 25.00 

Pikeville, Mission 50.00 

Pollocksville. Mission........ 48.00 

Robersonville. Mission 25.00 

Roiter, St. Ann's 60.00 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 130.00 

Williamston. St. Ignatius' 30.00 

Wilmin,gton,"Brooklyn"Mission 15.00 
\Vrfi,ghtsville,"McCumber's"Miss 20.00 

Farmville, Mission 15.00 



Paid by Paid by 
Parish Ch. School. 

25.00 

20.00 10.00 
25.00 .. .. 



1.00 

42.00 

45.88 54.77 



10.00 
15.00 

12.50 
11.00 



10.25 



30.00 



10.00 5.56 

12.97 

8.32 

5.00 ...... 



$55983.00 



ENJOYABLE GET-TOGETHER MEETING AT COLUMBIA. 



MISS PEACOCK ELECTED PRESIDENT OF GROUP. 



The women of the Creswell. Columbia. Plymouth. Roper 
and Williamston churches had a most enjoyable and profit- 
able "get together meeting" at St. Andrew's Church, Co- 
lumbia, on Wednesday, May 12th. I\Trs. Andrew Cahoon, of 
Columbia, presided, and Mrs. W. S. Carawan, of Columbia, 
acted as secretary. The Rev. C. E. Williams opened the 
meetin.g with a service of the Litany. 

The program was of a high order, and the attendance the 
largest in the history of the group meetings. The address 
of welcome was made by Mrs C. B. McKeel, and response 
made by Miss Carrie Mae Holmes, of Creswell. The first 
paper on the program was by Mrs. C. W. Tatem, of Colum- 
bia, on "The Sunday S'chool". Mrs. Tatem gave a ^€ry 
encouraging account of the growth of the St. Andrew's 
school. Mrs J. B. Edmonson, of Plymouth, read an inter- 
esting pnper on "The ideals of the meetings, and how to 
make them a success." The Rev. Theodore Partrick, Jr., 
concluded the program of the morning with an address on 
the present-day movements in the Church. 

The women of St. .4ndrew's were hostesses at a beauti 
fully served luncheon following the morning session. 

The afternoon session was featured by addresses by Miss 
.\ugusta Carstarphen, of Roper; Mrs. Cecil Swain, of Cres- 
well: and the Rev. C. E. Williams. Miss Carstarphen read 
an inspiring paper on personal consecration, and Mrs. 
Swain gave information about the United Thank Offering. 
Mr. Williams brought the meeting to a close with a devo- 
tional address, in which he urged the women present to 
give their full support to the religious education of the 
young. 

Miss Ida Peacock, of Roper, was elected president of the 
.group for the ensuing year, and Mrs. James Leary, of 
Roper, was elected secretary. The next meetin.g will be In 
S't, Luke's. Roper,, in October. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



AN INTER-DIOCESAN CONFERENCE ON EVANGELISM. 



NEWS OF ROBESON COUNTY FIELD- 



TO BE HELD AT ST. MARY'S', RALEIGH, JUNE 8 and 9. 



Of very great interest to all the clergy of Bast Carolina 
is the announcement that an inter-diocesan conference on 
Evangelism has heen arranged to meet at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, en June 8 and 9th. It -will be a 
joint conference of the dioceses of North Carolina and 
East Carolina, and all of the clergy are invited and urged 
to attend. The Bishops of the two dioceses have sanctioned 
the conference, and will have an important part in its 
promotion. 

An interesting program has lieen arranged. It includes: 

"The Bishop's Crusade and Program of the National 
Commission on Evangelism," by Bishop Darst chairman 
of that commission. 

"The Teaching Mission," by Rev. Tracy T. Walsh. 

"Rural Evangelism and Children's Missions," Rev. B E. 
Brown. 

"The Missioner, His Preparation and Work" Rev. Loring 
Clark, D,D. 

"The Methods and Mechanics of Evangelistic Missions," 
Rev. C. O. Pardo, 

"Evangelism," Types, Plans, Campai.gn Methods, etc. 
Rev. Charles L Goodell, of the Federal Council of Churc'ies. 

There will be a registration fee of .$5.00, which will 
cover all expense. The secretary of the Ccmmissicn on 
Evangelism in each diocese will act as registrar for t?iat 
diocese. All checks and applications should he received 
hy him. The Rev. Stephen Gardner will act in East 
Carolina. 

This will be a great opportunity for the clergy of East 
Carolina to acquaint themselves with a movement of vital 
importance. They are urged to notify Mr. Gardner of their 
intention to attend. 



A BLESSED EASTER SEASON AT CHURCH OF GOOD 
SHEPHERD. WILMINGTON. 



The congregation of Good Shephe 'd Ch'cvch 'ntei'pd -nto 
the full .ioy of a Blessed Easter Day after a most hc^ ^ful 
Lenten Season. 

The three S'ervices of the day were well attended sliow;ng 
a steady growth. It was again our priA'ilege to have our be- 
loved Bishop with us at the eleven o'clock service when a^ 
usual he gave one of his inspiring sermons. 

At the Church School Easter Festival the Junior ;'nd 
Primary Leagues presented an Easter pageant. 

A special feature of the Festival was the beautiful Brig 
"Inspiration", with a crew representing every nation on 
her deck. 

As she lay anchored in the harbor waiting to receive her 
cargo, the Rector in his remai'ks to the Church School said 
in part: "The Brig is built of the best materials, because it 
is intended for the highest purpose, viz: to carry the Gospel 
to the ends of the earth. The beams, planks and nails are 
made of good character, put in place and fitted together by 
daily duty. The Masts are lofty aims and endeavors, crown- 
ed with two flags — the love of Christ — the love of conntry. 
The Brig is guided by the compass of conscience and steer- 
ed by the rudder of self-control. The ch?rt is the Ploly 
Bible. The nautical almanac is the Book of Common 
Prayer. The cargo will consist of .gifts of love and service. 
The crew are all Christian people. The Captain is our 
Lord and Savior Jesus Christ." 

The children then came forward :ind loaded ber to the 
guards with their mite boxes which contained their offer- 
ings of self-sacrifice. The Brig was then ready to set sail 
on her trip around the world to carry to those who sit in 
darkness the Li.ght of the Gospel of her Captain, the Risen 
Christ. 



The Missionary in this field feels very much encouraged 
the way the work of the Church in Robeson County is pro- 
gressing. It is a rather difficult field as the Baptists, Pres- 
byterians, and Methodists are strong, and this Church 
rather weak. We have been having very good congrega- 
fions and many of other Christian communions have been 
intending our servi'^^es. T am strongly of the opinion that 
the Diocese should buy a rectory in Lumberton, the county 
seal of Robeson for the use of the Missionary in the field. 
The Church people in Lumberton, Hope Mills, and Red 
fi'prings are hardly able to provide a rectory, but I am sure 
would do all they could to assist. They are doin.g what 
they can to build up the Church and are much interested. 
Mr. J. Q. Reckwith, our faithful Lay Reader at Lumberton 
and who was largely instrumentil in building the Church 
there, comes of a family of Bishops and Priests, being a 
nephew of Bishop Beckwith, of Alabama He took a 
deep interest in the Stephen's revival which created such a 
stir in Lumberton a year or two ago The results are still 
evident in the Men's Christian Service T ea.gue of all denom- 
inations which meets every morning in the Court House 
for prayer and every Sunday afternoon in the High Scr-.ool 
building. Through Mr. Beckwith I was introduced to them, 
and have had prayer and addresses a number of times also 
prayer nt a Baptist revival, where T was very cordially re- 
ceived. We had the Christian League as our guests in 
Trinity Church, and had an old time Prayer and Experience 
meeting. We used their hymnal. I presided in my cass6ck. 
gave out the hymns and called on different ones to pray and 
sr>eak. It did us a lot of good and pleased them very much. 
Mr. Beckyvith thinks we are breaking down a great deal of 
pi'eiudice against the Church. 



NEWS OF ST. JAMES CHURCH, AYDEN. N. C- , 

During the past few months we have finished laying con- 
crete walks from the street pavement to the Rector.'-, the 
Church .ind tho Vestry Room. We have also loveled the 
church yard to rorresnond with the line of the walks, have' 
=own grass seed around the church, fnd set out some shrub- 
bery. We also had several wall fences built at the hick of 
the church. This work has added much to the beauty of 
the church yard. 

The Methodist people have been worsbjruii-ng in our 
Church during the past month, on account of their Church 
being moved to another site. We count it ''n unusu^il privi- 
lege and ble='ciTi<^ to hnve fhese .°:rod ppopTp in our Churf>h 
everv Sunday. The Rev IVTr. Brcum. the ^''"etbodi'^t Pastor, 
h^s been in .Ayden hut a short while: hut in that time has 
greatly endeared him/^elf to our people. 

On April IRtb. 192fi. 'Pisbop Darst visited u'; -ind con-f^rred 
the Apostolic Rite nf Confirmation upon a nioc.^ of eloypn 
f'^ndidates nre'^pnted by ovr Rector, the T?pv. G. F. C.^mc'en. 
This increased our ron-ini'iri'C'in* T i';! i->io"t "'f^ ncr cent 



T'-lF TDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE A GREAT &"CCP?S. 



The educntiopi] ipotitutP c^nrTji'^t.pr] i-n Pt .ToIip'r Fovpttp, 
kviIIp on M^'v -rd and 4th. bv Mjc'c; t nnri T?. 'Povpr, of 'N'pw 
Vorlr, was a arreat STiccess. nccordin°: tO' fill npoounts fhat 
hive renphed the Mission Herald. There w^o a ^ood ^^tten- 
dan'^e of wompp from various parts of the Diocese, "nd the 
hospitalitv of f-'o womop of P't. .Tobn's insured a plpasint 
st^'i' in the old citv of Fivetteville. 

TTie Rev. .T^met' F. W. Coo> m^dp fio opppipfr ad'^ress 
on the evening of the fJrd. and he ii'as heird with fre^t 
plpisure and Profit. Mi=s Bover'c ooTi<'prpnce= on the meth- 
ods of tbo di^ci'soien ptoups ^nd her deniopstmtiops with 
the use of the Latin .Ameripan te'^'t book, aroused gre^t in- 
terest and .gave real training to future leaders of such 
groups. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



ST. JOHN 6, bON^t.^TOlN, CELEBRATESi lOOTH 
ANNIVEftSARY. 



THt BIRTHDAY THANK OFFERING. 



(By tiie Rev. T. -S. iJiincetield.; 

April ibtu 01 tnia year ruarKea me one nuudredtli auui- 
\ert,ary oi uia ol. jonns uiiurtii ai (.Mouui nopej Liar- 
iiaui s oreeiv, an cne place was Known at tnat time. 

iUibsicncii> woriv nas oeen carried on in cne Lommuniiy 
lor bome time out mere was no Unurcn uuiiding, tne ±iev. 
josepn i'lerson ueiug tne xviinisier in eiiaiiit; \\as moii u- 
meniai in Duiiuing tne nrsi unuicli men locateu in a sur- 
est just Dove tne uanivs oi uuraam s Creeiv and aDout 
tnree and a naii miles irom its moatli, a Deautiiul oroad 
stream oi water emptying into l^amliLO Kiver. 

Tne buiiamg a piain wooaen sirucmie liad ueen compieied 
ana on ^prii lotn, xS'Zii, Bisnop Kavens^roit maae liis Urst 
visit to tuis Gnuicn wneie ne connrmed a class oi twelve 
peisons. 'ine recoras oi me tarisii (lew in numoerj say 
tuat on tiiat day tnere was witn tne Bisnop me Kev. Jonn 
Avery auu Josei)n i-ierscn anu tnai. Holy Communion was 
aUmiuisLereu anu lUe cnurcn uuiiaing consecrated. 

urom tnat time on tne woriv grew and at one time was a 
liourisiiing paiisn, uut like most of tne rural cliurciies in 
iiiast Uaioiiiia me greater numuer ox its memuers nave died 
or moved away, until loday me ir'arisn witn its present 
buiiuing wlilcn was ouilt aoout 1898 is located at iionnerton 
some two or tnree miies soatn of me original location, is 
not large out we leei silii one oi tlie important small parisii- 
es 111 ine ±turai uiotrict oi tne uiocese. because here we nave 
a numuer oi aescenaants oi tnose early pioneer cnurcnmen 
vvliose loyalty to and laitn in tne churcn is as fine as can 
be lound anywnere. 

it IS to De regretted that we do not have a more com- 
plete record or tnis old Parish, but there are only a lew 
oi tne recorded facts leit so that it is practically impossible 
to give a more detailed account of its history. 



MR. COOK MAKES ADDRESSES ON MASONRY. 



The Rev. James E. \V. Cook, Rector of St Pauls Church 
of Greenville, has made two visits to the Masonic Lodge 
in Aurora this year. 

On February 2:iud, Washington's Birthday, he made his 
fust visit and gave a most wonderful, fine and helpful ad- 
dress to the Masons in the l^odge Hall and also another 
address to a large number of the towns people who had 
been invited by the Masonic Lodge to hear him in an open 
address on masonry. This address was given in Thompson 
hall where iig^it refreshments were served. 

On May 10th Memorial Day, Mr. Cook made us another 
visit and gave a most helpful and inspiring address to the 
Masons in the Lodge hall, and again in Thompson Hail 
addressed a large number of invited guests of the Masonic 
Lodge. 

Both of Mr. Cook's addresses weie greatly appreciated by 
all who heard him and no doubt the finest of their kind ever 
made in the town. T. N. B. 



The Rev. W. H. Milton, D.D., attended a meeting of the 
National Council of the Cnurch, held at Racine, Wisconsin, 
on May 14th. Dr Milton was elected a member of the 
National Council at the last meeting of the General Con- 
vention. 



The Rev. G. W. Lay, D.C.L., chairman of the department 
of Religious Education of East Carolina, has written to- the 
clergy of the Diocese, offering to assist in starting off 
locally conducted teacher-training classes and in improving 
organization and management of the Sunday schools. This 
would be very valuable follow-up work in those churches 
that were visited by Miss Stout, and where much enthus- 
iasm was aroused for the betterment of the schools. 



(.By Mrs. William von EbersLein.j 

Whitsunday is approaching, and our boys and girls will 
make the first ofterlng for the new project, the Hooker 
^cnool in Mexico. 

Hooker School cares for the motherless and fatherless 
children, aov many years it continued as an asylum, a 
nappy home lor needy children, and little by little it took 
on tne nature of a school. Tiie one great and fundamental 
need lor ooys and girls of Mexico, is education, and the 
ciiurcii has been answering this call. Deaconess Bedell is 
m charge, and she writes tnat much more room and better 
ey,uipment is needed. 

The first Birthday Thank Offering was presented at the 
General Cou\eniion in Portland, Oregon, in 1922, and 
amounted to $8,126. This was given to Bishop Kowe, of 
Alaska, for his new boat, the "Pelican 11". The second 
oneiing, presented to Bishop Overs in New Orleans, was to 
build and equip a school in Liberia, and amounted to $22,- 
■i-iG.77. 

The third Birthday Thank Offering is now before us. 
How are we going to meet it? Compare tne amount of the 
first and second oherings. If enough money is given, the 
new wing on the building can be built, and pernaps new 
scholarships can be established. 

Each parish is free to work out its own method of pre- 
senting the Oheriug. But we do insist on the use of the 
envelopes, which you can get lor the asking, No. 4537, from 
the Church Missions House. After the presentation service, 
the money is forwarded to the diocesan treasurer of the 
Church &'cliool Service League, Mrs. Charles Ives, New 
Bern, N. C. 



ZION CHURCH HAS HOME-COMING DAY. 



Old /ion Church, near Washington, celebrated "Mother's 
Day" on Sunday, May 9th, in a most appropriate manner, 
by having an all-day service for the many families and in- 
dividuals scattered over eastern North Carolina whom she 
has mothered. The old "Mother Church" was thronged for 
the morning service, when the Rev. T. N. Brincefield, a 
former rector, preached a special sermon. The service was 
in charge of the present rector, the Rev. Howard AUigood. 
After a bountiful picnic dinner on the grounds, another ser- 
vice was held, and an address made by the Rev. Stephen 
Gardner. At the close of the afternoon service the Rev. 
Theodore Partrick, Jr., who was present, was called on for 
a brief address. It was a very pleasant occasion indeed, and 
may become an annual event. 



NEWS OF THE PLYMOUTH AND ROPER CHURCHES. 



The congregation of Grace Church, Plymouth, made a 
pilgrimage to St. Thomas', Bath, on Sunday, May 9th. At 
eleven o'clock there was a service of the Holy Communion, 
and an address by the Rev. Theodore Partrick, Jr. A picnic 
dinner on the church grounds followed the service. 

A "Spring Festival," something in the nature of a home- 
grown Chautauqua, was held in Plymouth again this year, 
under the direction of Parochial S'ociety of Grace Church. 
Friends from Washington, Tarboro, Norfolk and other 
points assisted the Plymouth musicians and entertainers 
in giving a most attractive three-day program. 

Miss Annie Morton Stout's visit to St. Luke's, Roper, and 
Grace Church, Plymouth, was greatly enjoyed, and will 
prove beneficial. 

St. Lu-ke's Sunday school is following its annual custom 
of having a special service on Whitsunday afternoon for 
the presentation of the Birthday Thank Offering. The 
service, featured by a pageant, is gotten up under the 
direction of Miss Ida Peacock, 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Ube /llbission 1Deial6. 



OKUAN Ub" THE, UlOCEriE OF EAo'l CAKUi^liNA 

l^ublisued iVionthly ul 

PL.YMOUTH, i\OHTH GAKULiiNA. 



SuDsci'iption One Dollar A i eai 



EDITORIAL. STAJri^F: 
Editor; 
REV. THEODuRE PARTKICK, JR. 
ContribuLing Editors: 
RT. REV. 'lHOiVlAk~ C. DARtiT, D.D. 
RiHW R. B. DRAiNE, l).V. 
REV. JAMEri E. W. COOK, 
MRS. JAMES G. tTATOxN. 



AdverLismg rates turnisJied on application, 
ouiiuaries and lormal resolutions, one cent per word. 

NOTICE Oi' EiNTKi. 

Acceptance lor mauing at special raie ol posiage, pro- 
viued ior in SecLion iiUo.Act ui oci.0L.er 6, ian, auiuor- 
izeu Noveinuer iJuin, lyis. 



ouuscriUeis cnanging tneir addresses, or railing lo receive 
their papers, should promptly notify tne manager, giving 
wnen necessary, both tlie old and new addresses. 

bubscriuers wishing to uisconiiuue tueir 6uu^^crlpnoua 
should so notify the Manager, as an absence of such uotia- 
cation IS consiuered a continuance of the subscription. 

All articles tor publicaLion should reach the Business 
Manager by the :ioth of the month. i\ew suoscriptious, 
renewals, requests for change of address and copy for ad- 
vertisements should be sent to 

REV. IHEODORE PARTRiCK, JR., 
Plymouth, N. G. 

YOUNG PEOPLE TO HAVE ANOTHER INNING. 

News that the young people of East Carolina are to 
have another Convention, mis time at St. Peter s vv ashing- 
ton, gives added emphasis to the fact that the Church is 
giving more and more attention to the young liie. v\e nail 
the Convention with pleasure for it wul piay an important 
part in creating and fostering a consciousness of our dio- 
cesan responsiuility for developing the future leadership 
of the Church. 

The large number of young people who will undoubtedly 
be present are very fortunate in that they will have a 
quartet of inspiring leaders; Bishops Darst and Penick, 
Mr. McKinstry and Frank Dean. The program, as given 
elsewhere, gives rich promise of a combination of work, 
worship and pleasure. The very great value of a large 
attendance upon the Convention is manifest, for it will 
give birth to such enthusiasm and ideas as will help the 
leagues and societies back home. By all means, the clergy 
should give the Convention their cordial support. It will 
probably be the last, as by next summer it is expected that 
a camp site will be provided and the summer camp will 
replace it. T. P., JR. 



THE CONFERENCE ON EVANGELISM. 

Conferences, conventions, summer camps, etc , are com- 
ing so thick and fast these summer days that it is getting 
to be quite an exciting adventure to decide which ones offer 
us most and come within striking distance of our pocket 
books. But we think that the clergy of East Carolina will 
hardly question the desirability of attending the inter- 
diocesan conference on Evangelism at S't. Mary's School, 
Raleigh, on June 8th and 9th, news mention of which is 



made in this issue of the Mission Herald. A glance at the 
personnel of the conference leaders furnishes evidence of 
tne desirability. Tne questions to be discussed are oi para- 
mount importance, and the men who are to lead the dis- 
cussions are pioneers in the held of evangelism as it is 
practiced in tnis Church. Bishop Darst will be back from 
a montu s visit to many important cities of the West, so 
that his reciiai of conditions and needs should be of great 
interest. Tne conference will train our clergy for leader- 
snip in a movement that will loom large in tne lite of the 
Church in the future. T. P., JR. 



A SANE VIEW ON A LIVE ISSUE. 

The convention of the diocese of North Carolina, meet- 
ing in Calvary Cnurch, Taruoro, this month passed a resolu- 
tion triat was liKe a ray of light shining out of the dariiness 
Ol iiiucn beiuddied thinking, it says; 

"This convention, believing that the cause of 
Christianity can be upneid and furthered only by 
louowing tne example and precepts of Jesus Cnrist, 
ana that true faith can grow oniy in an atmosphere 
of ireedom, puts itself on record as deploring and 
opposing all eiiorts to limit freedom of teacmng 
and discussion, and freedom of re-search to ascer- 
tain tne truth in any branch of knowledge." 
This pronouncement of the Church's position comes with 
peculiar force at this time, when a number of religious 
leadeis, native and imported, seem bent on driving intelli- 
gence and scholarship out of the churches. it seems 
strange indeed that such a resolution should be even re- 
motely necessary in tnis day and time, yet there is such a 
lecruuescence of the fear of freedom and learning that it 
is positively heroic. We feel grateful to the mover of the 
resolution and the convention for publishing to the world 
the attitude of our own Church. T. P., JR. 



AN ATMOSPHERE OF FREEDOM. 

The "committee of lUO ", the organization recently effected 
in Charlotte tor the avowed purpose of conducting a cam- 
paign in North Carolina "to prohibit the teaching of anti- 
Bible theories of evolution in the State college and public 
schools," and the imported "Bible Crusaders," who are 
making many speeches over the S'tate, are doing the cause 
of the Christian religion a distinct disservice, we .believe. 
For one thing, their habit of denouncing in heated terms 
all views other than their own and ascribing wicked mo- 
tives to educational leaders seems far removed from tliat 
charity which is Christian. The Mission Herald has stated 
its position before, but it doesn't hesitate to do so again. 
We believe that it is the worst sort of skepticism to be 
afraid to subject our faith to the clear light of advancing 
knowledge. It would be a tremendously hurtful thing tor 
the Church to assume to dictate to scientists the theories 
that they shall hold, or to dictate to teachers what they 
shall teach There is something vitally wrong with a faith 
that is afraid that its mold will have to be recast by a(;.ii 
tioual light and learning. Let us have complete freedom 
of research and give men the right to search for the truth 
in every realm of thought, confident in the faith that all 
iruth is of God. We have nothing to fear from learning. 
If the theories that are advanced are untrue, they will fall. 
If tJiey are true, we cannot afford to be found fighting 
against the truth. Instead of alienating the intelligence 
of men, let us show all sympathy for their desire to know, 
and interpret the knowledge they gain in terms of the un- 
derlying spiritual realities. T. P., JR. 



The Rev. H. D. Cone, Rector of St. Paul's, Clinton, vis- 
ited friends and relatives in Washington and Baltimore 
for several days after Easter. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Personal Items. 



The Rev. Howard Alligood, who is now making his home 
at Washingion and serving several nearby churches 
preached a special sermon to the members of the Charit- 
able lirotherhood, Lodge Mo. 1, ^at St. Stephen s cnurcn, 
near Washington, on Sunday alternoon May 9th. 



The Rev. J. W. Heyes, Rector of Emmanuel, Farmville, 
preached the baccaulaureate sermon to the graduating class 
of the high school at Whiteville, N. C. 



i 



Rev. Messrs. J. N. Bynum, Stephen Gardner, C. E, Wil- 
liams, G. F. Cameron and Theodore Partrick, Jr., attended 
tne meetings of the Church Congress in Richmond, Va., the 
last week in April. Mrs. Bynum' accompanied Mr. B'>num 
to Richmond, where she visited relatives. 



The Rev. Frank D. Dean, of Wilmington, conducted a 
pi-eaching mission in VVeldon the week beginning April 
l8th. Mr. Dean's sermons attracted such favorable notice 
that the Episcopal Church building was not large enough, 
ana tne concluaing services were heid in the more capacious 
Methodist church. 



The Rev. Stephen Gardner, of Washington, has had the 
honor of preaching two baccalaureate sermons this year; 
one at the High School in Trenton, on May 2nd; and the 
other at the Bath High School on the evening of May 9th. 

The Rev. G. F. Cameron, of Ayden, recently filled the pul- 
pit of the Rev. E. W. Halleck at St. John's, VVilmingioii, 
while Mr. Halleck was on a visit to Atlanta, Ga. 



The baccalaureate sermon to the graduating class of the 
Lumberton High School was preached this year by the 
Rev. W. H. Milton, D.D., Rector of St. James, Wilmington. 



Miss Mary Woolvin, of Wilmington, had the honor of 
being one of the pages at the Continental Congress of the 
D. A. R., which met in Washington, D. C, in April. 



Bishop Darst has had quite an unusual honor given him 
recently by being made a trustee of Pineland School for 
Girls, a Baptist Institution in Sampson County. This 
school, which is now a junior college with a record of 
great usefulness, has recently put on a campaign to raise 
a 1500,000 endowment fund. 



Friends of Mrs. J. L,. Shackleford, a very active Church- 
woman of Farmville, will be interested to learn that her 
mezzo-soprano voice was broadcasted over the radio in 
Atlanta, Ga., recently, from station W. S. B.. Mrs. Shackle- 
ford was visiting friends in Atlanta at the time. 



Her numerous friends in East Carolina will be glad to 
learn that Mrs. A. M. Waddell is rapidly recuperating from 
an operation she recently underwent in a Wilmington 
hospital. 



The Rev. G. F. Cameron of Ayden, N. C, preached the 
baccalaureate sermon at the commencement exercises of the 
Hope Mills High S'chool on May 23rd. He is a native of 
Hope Mills, and an alumnus of the school. 



Beginning May 11th, the Rev. G. F. Cameron, of Ayden, 
delivered three lectures to the students and faculty of 
Eureka College, the Free Will Baptist institution at Ayden. 
His subjects were: Socrates, an Example of intellectual In- 
tegrity; 2nd, Christianity is the Way of Life; 3rd, The 
Beauty of the Sacrificial Life. 



CHURCH KALENDAR MAY-JUNE, 1926. 



'O live ye by the Kalendar, 

And with the good ye dwell; 

The Spirit that came down on them 

Will Lighten you as well." — Bishop Coxe. 



May 23— Whitsunday 

24— Whitsun Monday 

25 — -Whitsun Tuesday 

30 — ^Trinity S'unday 
June 6 — First Sunday after Trinity 

11 — S. Barnabas 

13— Second Sunday after Trinity 

20 — Third S'unday after Trinity 

24 — Nativity S. John Baptist 



(Red; 

(Red) 

(Red) 
(White) 
(Green) 

(Red) 
(Green) 
(GreenT 
(White) 



A CONFERENCE THAT WILL INSPIRE. 

The Mission Herald is asked to call the attention of its 
leaders lo the Missionary Educational Conference, which is. 
to be held at Blue Ridge, N. C, from June 25th to July 5th 
Some of the greatest inspirational speakers of the country 
will take part. Our own Church will contribute two of 
these: Miss Grace Lindley, and Bishop Bratton, both ot 
whom will conduct classes. Bishop Bratton is to speak on 
Evangelism. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS PAID DURING MONTH OF APRIL, 1926 



Those paying one dollar: Mrs. H. M. Bell,Mrs. S'ol Cherry, 
Mrs. J. W. Cooper, Mrs. E. W. Gray, Mrs. George Gray, 
Rev. A. J. Mackie, Mrs. J. E.. Nicholls, Mrs. C. J. Rhea, 
Mrs. C. J. Sawyer, Mrs. R. W. Askew, E. H. McConnell, 
R. A. Mackie, Sr., Mrs. R, A, Williford, Mrs. R. H. Patter- 
son, Mrs. S. L. Blount, Mrs. T. W. Blount, Mrs. J. W. 
Buchanan, Mrs. J. F. Leary, Mrs. R. R. Roper, Mrs. E. L. 
S'pruill, Miss Ida Peacock, Mrs. J. W. Speight, Mrs. J. E. 
Blount. Mrs. Fannie Cordon, Mrs. G. E. Butler, Miss Mil- 
dred Fleming, Mrs. J. L. Kerr, Mrs. W. H. Herring, W. A. 
Smith, Rev. William Oglesby, Miss Lena Beery, Miss Annie 
P. Kidder, M. G. Saunders, Mrs. D. H. Scott, Mrs. W. B. 
Thorpe, Miss Sallie G. Price, Mrs. L. L. Sparrow, Mrs B. 
N. Strother, Mrs. J. L. Sprunt, Mrs. Hugh McRae, Mrs. 
George LeGrand, Mrs. Douglas Taylor, Miss Harriet Whit- 
taker, Miss Sue Collier, Rev. W. O. Cone, Miss Corinne 
Dortch, Mrs. Andrew Falkener, J. E. F. Hicks, Mrs. H. M. 
Humphrey, H. Fitzhugh Lee, Miss Lucy Miller, George C. 
Royall, Mrs. W. H. Smith, Mrs. Marcia Jordan, Mrs. C. E. 
Leens, Mrs. Allen Chauncey, Hon. Hallet Ward, Mrs. J. D. 
Calais, Mrs. J. M. Loker, Mrs. W. E. Warner, Mrs. W. T. 
Boyd, Mrs. S'am Mallison, Mrs. J. D. Archbell, Rev. H. M. 
Green, W., L. Sanwell, E, L. Banks, Mrs. T. H. Jennette, 
Mrs. M. N. Williams, Mrs. W. F. Murphy, Jr., Norwood Til- 
linghast, Sam Tillinghast, Mrs. W. N. Tillinghast, Mrs. G. 
B Robertson, Mrs. W. M. Jordan, Mrs. J. L. Allen, Miss 
Harriet Haigh, Mrs. W. J. Green, Major Joseph Huske, 
Mrs. F. R. Rose, Mrs. F. C. Saunders, Mrs. C. A. Swain, 
C. B. Williams, Mrs. T. C. Holmes, Mrs. W. D. Peal, Mrs. 
J. W. Starr, Mrs. R. A. Williford, F. P. Haywood, Miss Alice 
Adkins, T. B. Carr, Mrs. Charles Hewett, Mrs. Gilbert Mes- 
sick, Mrs. Annie K. Parker, Miss M. L. Parkhill, C. L. 
S'tevens, W. H. Jackson, E. B. Marston, Jonas Warren, 
Mrs. W. S. Summerell, Mrs. E. H. Walke, Mrs. Fannie 
Laughinghouse. Total $100.00. 

Those paying more than one dollar: Mrs. J. E. Mat- 
thews, $2,00; J. Theo. Randolph, $5.00; Mrs. C. T. Cordon, 
$2.00; Mrs. S. M. Bioatwright, $2.00; Miss Louisa Norfleet, 
$2.00. Total $13.00. 

Total for month, $113.00. 



TO 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE AND TRAINING INSTITU- 
TION, CHARLOTTE, N. 0. 



APRIL, AT THE ORPHANAGE. 



E.eiy now and then some one sends the Orphanage a 
gill hi nvfe or ten dollars in memory of a loved one who has 
Qieci. Xiiese gitts are recorded in a book of remembrance 
ana placed in the endowment lund, whereby the memorial is 
ptri-fciualed and goes on doing good for all the years to 
n,.ne This seems to us such a beautiful way in which 
10 remember one's relatives or friends that we think more 
people would choose mis way of making gifts if it were 
brought to tneir attention. 

Not long age some iriends sent us a check for live dollars 
in liei> ^,. mowers which they would othtrwise have sent to 
a iaiiiii\ in their bereavement, the money being used to care 
lor soiue of tnese little ones committed to our care. We 
wrote to the family notifying them of this memorial to 
tneir departed loved one and received a reply from tnem 
u.vpressing deep gratitude for this expression of sympathy 
and love. Is it not more beautiful to honor the memory 
^L a dear one departed in tlris manner than to send the 
mstoniaiy flowers which so soon perish? 

The announceiueat in the daily papers that Mr. William 
H. Williamson, a. devoted and generous friend of the Or- 
phanage, had lelt in his will a bequest of $40,000 to the 
Orphanage, has been received with the greatest joy and 
gratitude. The splendid Williamson Infirmary stands as a 
monument to tlje loving thought of Mr. and Mrs. William- 
son for the Orphanage. The love and sympathy of the 
entire Orphanage family goes out to the family in their 
sorrow in which we all share. 

The Sunday School of the Chapel of St Mary the Virgin 
is jubilant over their Lenten Mite Box offering, which on a 
quota of 140.00 reached the grand total of $102.20. 

The services on Easter Day were very beautiful. The 
choir looked especially nice in their new vestments con- 
tributd by St. Peter's Church Service League. All the 
children attended the Sunday School service at St. Peter's 
in the afternoon. 

We wish to express here our sincere appreciation of the 
many Easter boxes received containing the fruits of a 
great amount of hard and faithful Lenten sewing for the 
children. S'pecial mention should be made of the dresses 
made for every girl by the members of St. Peter's Service 
League, and the three big boxes containing beautiful cloth- 
ing for every one of the children made during Lent by the 
members of St. Paul's Church Service League of Winston- 
S'alem. 

On Easter Monday the annual egg hunt was held on the 
oampus. Special sections of the campus were allotted for 
the different ages of children. In this way all children 
had an equal oi^portunity to find eggs. There were little 
Easter bunnies for the younger ones and ice cream cones 
for all and a very happy afternoon was enjoyed by all. 
Every year St. Peter's Service League has provided this 
treat for the children and each hunt seems to exceed all 
foregoing ones in enjoyment. 

Our high school children are giving a good account of 
themselves in all activities. We have had representation 
on some of the athletic teams. Three of them recently 
took part in an operetta at Piedmont High and the words 
of the senior class song at Central High were written by 
one of our girls, Gwendolyn Witherspoon. 

On S'unday morning, April 18th, Bishop Penick made his 
annual visit to the Chapel of St. Mary the Virgin, preached 
and confirmed a class of ten, five boys and five girls. 

On the same afternoon at 4:00 o'clock, Mrs. Frank N. 
Challen, Executive Secretary of Young People's Work in 
the diocese, visited our branch of the Young People's Fel- 
lowhip and made a most interesting and helpful addres-s. 



Mrs. Challen expressed herself as greatly pleased with the 
L'ellowship at St. Mary's. 

CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED FROM DIOCESE EAST 
CAROLINA FROM MARCH 23 TO APRIL 23, 1926. 

CASH. 

Wilmington, Miss Columuia Munds ..$ 5.00 

Nv iimingLon, Miss W iinetmina Hariow 8 . UO 

V anceuoro, Mrs. L. E.. .tomitn 1 . OU 

Batn, b't. 'i'uomas' Woman s Auxiliary o.uO 

uatn, Mrs. M. E. Price 2.00 

Merry Hill, Emily, Richard and Whitmell Smith- 

wiciv 1 . 00 

IN KIND. 

Wilmington, St. Mary's Guild of St. James' Parish — 7 
ureases ana 'i suits. 

Hiiizaoetn City, Mrs. T. S. Harney's Bible Class — Box 
^lOLiimg lor Hester Smart. 

ueinaveu, fct. James' W. A. — 9 suits rompers and other 
cioiuing. 

.New Bern, Girls Friendly Society of Christ Church — Out- 
iii 01 CiOLuing lor Clara Bell Curtis. 

ooutuport, vvomans Auxiliary — Outfit of Clothing for 
octuie Cahoon. 

Wilmington, PI. C, McQueen — 4 copies "The Youth's Com- 
panion.' 

Wilmington, St. John's W. A. — 19 little girls' dresses, and 
ctuer ciOLUing. 



ST. MARY'S, KINSTON, AN HISTORIC PARISH. 



tC. W. McDevit in News and Observer.) 

Kinstcn, April 17 — The beginning of the Episcopal Parish 
here has been found to antedate the act incorporating the 
town by George III in November, 1762. The monarch au- 
thorized Francis McLewean, Richard Caswell, Simon Brignt, 
jr., John Shine and David Gordon, to lay off the town as 
trustees,, and to reserve one and a half acres as a site for 
a chapel and the "public." The public, it appears, meant 
a warehouse. The chapel, it seems, was standing at the 
time and the king's order merely meant that its future 
was to be made secure. 

From that time to 1832 the history of St. Mary's church 
here blends with that of Christ church at New Bern, since 
the parish at the latter place was self-supporting while 
that here was only a mission. 

In 1832 St. Mary' received new papers. The following 
were chosen vestrymen: Dr. Edward Bellamy, William 
Lovick, John Washington, Dr. Reuben Knox, George Whit- 
field, and Lewis C. Desmond. Because of the liberality of 
the citizens not members of the Episcopal church, the ves- 
try ordered the "opening of the church to all orthodox 
ministers of respectable standing in their churches." Until 
November, 1856, the only public place of worship in the 
town was S't. Mary's church. The Methodist and Baptist 
congregations used the building regularly for many years. 

Ihe Rev. Frederick Fitzgerald, who was rector from 
1855 to 1857, found upon assuming charge that the "church 
edifice was greatly out of repair from the effects of time.neg- 
lect and hard usage," and that this condition resulted from 
"political and other reasons apart from religion." So iii 
1S58 .■f2,000 was expended for repairs. The remodeled build- 
ing was consecrated by the Rt. Rev. Thomas Atkinson, 
bishop of North Carolina in 1860. It stood at \\ie corner 
of Queen and Caswell streets. The church was burned in 
1873 and the Episcopalians purchased an incompleted Pres- 
byterian church at King and McLewean streets. This was 
burned in 1900, when the present church was started. The 
church of today while not large is one of the most attrac- 
tive edifices in the section, famed for its stained glass win- 
dows. The windows are among the most artistic in the 
south. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



11 



Diocesan News. 



WHAT THE CHURCH IS DOING IN DIOCESE OF EAST 
CAROLINA. 



Mrs. W. O. S. S'outherlaiid, of Wilmington, has accepted 
appointment as chairman of publicity for the diocesan or- 
ganization of the Woman's Auxiliary and Parocliial Society. 
Mrs. Southerland writes tke Mission Herald that she is 
appointing a publicity chairman in every parish of the 
Diocese, whose duty it will be to gather interesting news 
items, and send them to the diocesan chairman A repre- 
sentative of the church papers will also be appointed in 
every parish. We hope that Mrs. Southerland will be given 
full support in this work. 



Miss Annie Morton Stout, field worker of the department 
of Religious Education of the Province of S'ewanee, made 
a ten days visit to East Carolina in April, going to a num- 
ber of parishes for conferences on the work of the Sunday 
schools. She was given a cordial welcome, and good re- 
sults are expected to follow her work. 



DR. DEAN PREACHES BACCALAUREATE SERMON AT 
ST. PETER'S. 



OTHER NEWS OF THE CHURCH' IN WAS'HINGTON 



The baccalaureate sermon for the graduating class of the 
Washington Collegiate Institute was preached in St. Peter's 
Church on S'unday morning. May 9th, by the Rev. F. D. 
Dean of Wilmington. Dr. Dean, who is very popular with 
young people all over the State, preached a sermon that 
greatly appealed to them and to their elders, who filled r' 
church. 

At the service on the morning of the 9th St. Peter's was 
filled with white and red roses, in keeping with the observ- 
ance of Mother's Day. The altar was banked with roses, 
in honor of all the mothers of the parish, both living and 
dead. The memorial furnishings were laden with roses 
in memory of departed ones. The music for the occasion 
was beautiful and appropriate. Mr. Gardner's solo, with 
harp accompaniment, was much appre-^iated. as were the 
solos of Mesdames E. H. Harding and E, M. Brown. 
■ On Low Sunday, at the morning service, a beautiful por- 
trait of the late Rev. Nathaniel Harding, Rector of the 
Parish for forty years, was presented to the Parish by the 
Hon. and Mrs. John H. Small. The address of presentation 
was made by Judge Stephen C. Bragaw, and it was accepted 
by Mr. T Harvey Myers, .Junior Warden, in the absence 
of Mr. J. G. Bragaw, S"r., Senior Warden. The portrait is 
the work of Freeman, of Washington, D. C. an artist of 
note, and is a full length oil painting. When the new 
parish house is completed, it will hang en the stage in 
the auditorium. In the meantime it hangs in the vestry 
room of the church. 

St. Peter's contains many beautiful memorials, which 
endear the church to the hearts of a very loyal congre.ga- 
tion. The latest memorial to be placed in the church was 
blessed on Sunday, May 2nd, at the morning service Imme- 
diately after the processional hymn, the Rector proceeded 
to bless the beautiful brass hymn tablet "To the .glory of 
God, and in loving memory of Mary Louisa Nutt Blount, 
1840-1924." The memorial is a gift of Mrs. Blount's daugh- 
ter, Mrs. T. Harvey Myers, wife of the Junior Warden of 
the Parish. 

The foundation of the parish house has now been com- 
pleted, and the members of the congregation are watching 
its construction with very great interest. 



A SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION OF GREAT 
INTEREST- 



MANY INSPIRATIONAL ADDRESSES. 



(By Miss Elizabeth Moore.) 

,\n inler-deuominational convention of Sunday school 
workers met in New Bern for three days in May, the sev- 
enth, eighth, and ninth. The convention had a large atten- 
dance :ind m,;ny churches were represented. 

The meeting whi;h opened Friday night wag hehl in the 
Centenary Methodist ciiurch The principal si)eaker was 
Robert Davids, cf Chicngo, who discussed the question Why 
Religious- Education? Another siJeaker was Miss Mabel 
Cooper, of New York, who delivered an address on the 
Program of Religious Education for the child. 

Mrs. S. H. -4skew, of Atlanta opened the convention Sat- 
u)-d-iy morning. In an inspirational address to the young 
people she presented the need cf daily vacation Bible 
S'chocls. Mrs. Askew asserted that they would advertise 
(hurches in the right way, would teach and train chilt'ren 
properly, would bring about better homes, and would give 
a better knowledge, love and practice for the Bi'^le. 

Dr. Owen C. Brown, of Philadelphia, spoke helpfully of 
the adults chance in the Sunday school. 

R. H Bachman. of Edenton. presided at the meeting 

The final meting was held Sunday night at the Taber- 
nacle Baptist Church. This meeting was held primarily 
for the young people whose ages ranged from twelve to 
twenty-three years. There were several t-ilks made by rep- 
resentatives of the different churches, who took' as their 
theme "Measuring Up." Different ways of measuring uii 
were discussed by the young people: measuring u]) in school 
work, in every day life, and in the home and church. 

The concluding speech was delivered by Miss Cvnf'' 
Maus, of St. Louis, Mo. Miss Maus spoke en the Life thit 
measures up giving as notable examples Queen A'i'to"' 
Florence Nightingale. Lincoln, Frances Willard and Helen 
Keller. 

The convention received the enthusiastic iiraise of all 
hearers, general comment being to the eifect that rarely 
have such instructive and inspirational addresses 1 ec n mi 
before local audiences. 



ITEMS OF INTEREST AND ENCOURAGEMENT. 



Confirmation classes of 54 are not so rare as to be "news", 
fortunately, but one does not often he^ar of 54 liaptisms 
at one service, which occurred, if we understand correctly, 
at Trinity Cathedral, Phoenix, Arizona. 3.1any of the 
adults were in a class of 43 confirmed the same day by 
the new Bishop of Arizona, Dr Mitchell. 



A Congregational missionary from Canton, Rev. Obed. 
J<.hnson, Carleton College '05, has taken a Ph.D. degree at 
the University of California, which is said to* be the first 
degree awarded for stud>- of original Chinese texts. 



Chicago City Mission staff ministers regularly to 18 in- 
stitutions, occasionally to seven more, with about 15 GOO 
inmates, making 25,262 calls recorded in a year, and aver- 
aging 921 miles of travel per week. 



New York City Mission distributes printed matter in fifty 
languages. Not long a,go they had a chaplain who could 
speak seven languages, and he used all seven in one day's 
visits. 



Voltaire, who died in 1778, prophesied that "one hundred 
years hence the Bible and the Christian religion will be 
but a memory," When the century had passed, the Inter- 
national Bible Society was using his former residence for 
headquarters. — Christ Church, Eau Claire, Wis. 



1^ 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



1926 GOALS FOR THOMPSON ORPHANAGE. 



CHRIST CHURCH, NEW BERN, CONGREGATION EN- 
GAGED IN MANY ACTIVITIES. 



Bdenton, St. Paul's $ 428.00 

Wilmington. St. James' 1 578 . 00 

Woodville, Grace Church 71 ..50 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 14.50 

Winterville, St. Luke's 28.50 

Creswell. St. David's 100.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church PAo.Oi) 

Fayetteville. St. .John's 615.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's , 215 . 00 

Greenville, S't. Paul's .500. 00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 1 68 . 00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 358.00 

New Bern, Christ Church 572 . 00 

Plymouth, Grace Church 1 43 . 00 

Washington,^ St. Patera's 643 . 00 

Wilmington, St. John's 428 . 00 

Wilmington. St. Paul's , . 285.00 

Windsor, St. Thomas' 115.00 

Ayden, St. James' 46.00 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 86 . 00 

Belhaven, St James' , . 71.50 

Bonnerton, St. John's 14.50 

Clinton. St. Paul's 57.25 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 36.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 28.50 

Roper, S't. Luke's 50.00 

Souhtport, St .Philip's 36 . 00 

Williamston, Shurch of Advent 71.50 

Winton, St. John's 28 . 50 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 43.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 76 . 00 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 18.00 

Snow Hill, St Barnabas' 28.50 

Warsaw, Calvary 11.50 

Whiteville, Grace Church 13.00 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 1 4 . 50 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 19 . 00 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's.... 10.00 

Swan Quarter. Calvary 8.50 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' 14.50 

Aurora. Holy Cross 71 . 50 

Bath, St. Thomas' 14.50 

Chocowinity. Trinity 14.50 

Grifton, St. John's 36.00 

Hope Mills Christ Church 21 . 50 

Jessama, Zion 39 . 50 

Lake Landing, St. George's 36.00 

Red S'prings, St. Stephen's 14.50 

iSeven Springs, Holy Innocents' 34.50 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 14.50 

Wilmington. Good S'hepherd 43 . Oo 

Bunyan, St Stephen's 3 . 50 

Edward. Redeemer . 3 . 50 

Fairfield, All Saints' 5 . 00 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 7 25 

Lumberton, Trinity. 14.50 

Maxton, St. Matthew's 7.25 

North West. All Souls' 7.25 

Sladesville, St. .John's 4.25 

Sunbury, St Peter's 14.50 

Trenton, Grace Church 18,00 

Wrightsville. St. Andrew's 14 . 5n 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 7.25 

Kinston, Christ Church 1 1 . 00 

Murfreesboro. St. B'arnabas' 7 . 2.5' 

Oriental St. Thomas' 3.50 

Pikeville, Mission 7.25 

Pollocksville^ Mission 7 . 00 

Bobersonville, Mission 3.50 



(Items taken from Christ Church Tidings.) 
April 16, the members of the Choir, with their wives 
and husbands, gathered at the rectory for an evening of 
])leasure. Tables were placed for many old-fashioned games 
which gave opportunity to the choir to renew an acquaint- 
ance with these old-time pastimes which in some instances 
had lapsed since youth! A pleasant evening was spent, 
although some of the guests had a hard time to get away 
from one of the tables. The prizes were won by Mrs. 
Leinster Duffy and Mr. Frank Moffett; consolation prizes 
by Mrs J. A. Howell and Mr. G. A. Farrow. After par- 
taking of refreshments, the party broke up and everybody 
went home, with renewed interest in the choir because of 
the social atmosphere of the evening. 

CHURCH SCHOOL. 

The officers and teachers of the school are keeping up 
their fine record of service, and the scholars are coming 
every S'unday in good numbers, so that this organization 
continues to flourish. It must very soon have more room, 
and the Vestry is planning ways and means to furnish it. 

BROTHERHOOD OP ST. ANDREW. 

The Brotherhood Chapter met at the Rectory on April 
19. It reported that it had arranged to take over the task 
of furnishing automobiles for the transportation of the 
Rector to the Mission Stations in this vicinity, S'unday 
afternoons. At this meeting, a new piece of work was 
undertaken. Cards were ordered inviting visitors to our 
Sunday services, and the brotherhood undertook to visit the 
three hotels in New Bern every Sunday night, and leave 
one of these invitations for every guest. This ought to 
result in a wider field of service for the Chapter, and for 
the Parish. 

ALL SAINTS' CHAPEL. 

The interest at the Chapel continues. During the month 
of April, Mrs Disosway gave the children two parties; one, 
an egg hunt on Easter Monday: the other, a little celebra- 
tion of re,ioicing over the fine Lenten work. Needless to 
say, the children en .joyed every minute of both. The Thurs- 
day evening services continue to be helpful; the two Biap- 
tisms recorded this month were at the Chapel. 

PARIS'H AID. 

During April this organization continued its quiet ser- 
vice to the community and the Parish. Five suppers wer? 
served during the month, and the women in charge of 
them bad worked hard and deserve the thanks of the con- 
gregation. The aid is now planning for its fall ■work, and 
hopes to take a large part in the Parish Bazaar, but that 
deserves another paragraph. 



FORMER EAST CAROLINA CLERGY ACTIVE IN 
SOUTHWEST. VIRGINIA. 



We note from recent numbers of the Church papers that 
a number of former East Carolina clergy are holding impor- 
tant positions in the diocese of Southwestern Vir.ginia. 
The Rev. Claiidius Smith has for manv years been one of 
its most effective workers. The Rev. J M. Robeson. D.D.. 
has recently been elected Diocesan Missioner. The Rev. D. 
Tj. Gwathmey has recently been elected to the Executive 
Council of the Diocese. The Diocesan Convention was 
held this year in Bristol, where the Rev. A. C. Tabeaii is 
Rector. 



THE MISSION HEJElALi). 



13 



THE CHURCH DEVELOPS AT AN IMPORTANT POINT. 



NEWS OF S'T. ANDREW'S, MOREHEAD CITY. 



(Correspondence of Mission Herald.) 

Except for occasional infrequent services by tlie rectors 
of New Bern and Beaufort, there had been no ministrations 
in Morehead City by our clergy until October 30th, 1919, 
when a few gathered at a private house. Thereafter there 
was a short service with instruction each week on Thurs- 
day evening, in the absence of any pastoral care and of 
regular services several of our people had joined other 
religious bodies and at first only five active Communicants 
cf the Church could be found. L.ater a monthly serv'ca 
■'A as held on Sunday afternoon successively in the movie 
theatre, in a room of the First Baptist Church and in the 
Director's Room of the Marine Bank. By the courtesy of 
the Baptist Church the first visitation by our Bishop was 
held in their church March 11th, 19:^3, when five persons 
were confirmed. 

For proper development however, it was quite necessary 
to have a building of our own. B"'inally the portable chapel 
that had been used at the shipyards in Wilmington duriiit; 
the World War was kindly presented to the congregation. 
It was taken apart, brought to Morehead City and put up 
on a lot generously lent by Mr. Charles S. Wallace, a Meth- 
odist. The first service was held in this building April 
6th, 19i24, and the Holy Communion was celebrated for the 
first time on Easter Tuesday, April 22nd of the same year. 
The last service was held on this site on March 14th of 
this year when the Bishop preached and confirmed four 
persons. The City had taken over the land containing this 
lot for a new city hall. The question was where to go. 
Fortunately Mrs. W. T. Brown, formerly of Winston-Salem, 
but now living in Morehead City, crowned many other gen- 
erous acts by giving a very suitable lot about one and a half 
blocks North West from the Atlantic Hotel. Exchanging 
this lot for the one immediately East resulted in obtaining 
$500 in addition with which to pay for moving the building 
and putting it and its surroundings in proper condition. 
The early celebration of the Holy Communioir on Eas- 
ter Day was the first service in St. Andrew's on its own 
grounds. 

As soon as the building was secured in 1924 the Bishop 
organized the congregation as a Mission and it adopted 
the name of S't. Andrew's Church. At the same time ser- 
vices began to be held every Sunday afternoon. This has 
been continued ever since except that last Summer for 
several weeks the services were held at night. This plan 
is to be carried out for most of the season for Summer 
visitors this year. Many visitors attended last year to the 
great encouragement of the resident members. Unfortun- 
ately this necessitates the omission of the night services in 
Beaufort. A boat trip of three miles separates the two 
towns. We are longing for the completion of the bridge 
which will greatly improve conditions. The usual after- 
noon service in Morehead City has to be held in the small 
amount of time left free by the three regular Sunday ser- 
vices in Beaufort. With the bridge in commission much 
time can be saved and some exposure in stormy weather 
avoided. 

The usual furnishings being lacking at first, every one 
helped to provide what was needed. The St. Mary's Guild 
gave a handsome brass Processional Cross; the ladies had 
the choir vestments ready for the first service; Mrs. Kia- 
sler of Morganton, secured a loan of a very suitable Com- 
munion Service; the priest-in-charge gave a small size 
Marginal Readings Bible; Christ Church, New Bern, gave 
a second-hand Reed organ which was very useful until 
later the congregation bought a new one; Mr. Theodore 
Webb gave two brass candlesticks for the altar; and Mrs. 
F. S. Hodge and Mrs. E. T. Jarman jointly two brass vases 
as memorials to their respective mothers. All in all the 



interior of the little church presents a very churchly and 
reverential appearance. 

The work in Morehead City has been made possible by 
the generosity of the diocesan authorities, but they cannoi 
be generous unless they are generously supported by all 
our people. Doubtless there are many other neglected 
places of equal promise where there is nood of our min- 
istrations. 

St. Andrew's is a small body of very faithful and loyal 
people. Even now there are only twenty active, resident 
communicants who with the efficient assistance of several 
others not yet confirmed are doing their very best to carry 
on a worthy work. Determination to carry on and desirt 
to be instructed are their outstanding characteristics. 



■'WHERE JEHOVAH WONT SWAT YOU IF YOU LAUGH" 

The old time religion that oppressed and frightened 
young folks by the terrible austerity and vindictiveness of 
a Jehovah whose house couldn't be laughed in, is passing. 
In Elizabeth City the Episcopalians are about to dedicate 
a Sunday School building that will be the ultimate word 
in religious educational and recreational centres, in Eliza- 
beth City at least. 

Christ Church, Parish House, to be completed and opened 
by August 1, 1926, will provide almost every delightful 
modern facility for entertaining the religious and social 
activities of the young folk, not only on Sundays but on 
week days and nights. 

Christ Church needed more room. Instead of rebuilding 
or adding to its church edifice it is putting upwards of 
$-10,000 into a parish house of permanency and surpassing 
beauty. Its fine Gothic lines and massive Tudor roof of 
heavy slate makes it one of the few out-standing buildings 
in Elizabeth City. 

The parish house has a frontage of 44 feet on East Fear- 
ing street 82 feet on McMorrine street and there is a south- 
east el or wing 26x32 feet. The first floor contains 15 Sun- 
day school class rooms, rest rooms for both men and women, 
a secretary's office and the rector's study. 

The upper floor is designed for various uses. It can be 
used as a theatre, seating more than 350 people; as a gym- 
nasium or as a banquet hall. It has a commodious stage; 
moving picture booth; kitchen, pantry and serving room. 
An el is devoted to one large cheery room for club and 
vestry meetings. 

The whole plant is designed to give both young and old 
folks a social centre in which every one may find pleasur- 
able occupation and enjoy being a Christian without stand- 
ing in constant dread of having the wrath of Hebraic Je- 
hovah of the thunderbolts spilled upon their heads or busted 
under their feet. 

Christ Church has in a big fine way helped to solve the 
problem of how to take care of the restless energetic spirit 
of modern youth and give young foUis a more inviting and 
attractive resort than they will find on street corners, dance 
halls and pool jjarlors. 

There are many interesting features of the new building. 
The roof carries 117,000 pounds of slate. The basement 
carrying the heating equipment has storage room for a 
full car load of coal. The heating and electrical equipment 
are of the best Dust and sweepings from all floors are 
carried to the basement through convenient chutes. 

No individual or group appears to take credit for the 
idea of the new parish house, but it is the outgrowth of the 
needs of such a house developed and made apparent as a 
result of the excellent parish work of the Rector, Rev. Geo. 
F. Hill and his wife. One of Mr. Hill's first activities 
when he came to Christ Church six years ago was to make 
over a small cottage on the church property into a parish 
house. This makeshift parish house was a great success 
and from its humble beginnings the big and impressive 
new building grew. — Elizabeth City Independent. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Young People's Department. 

Miss Elizabeth Moore, Editor of Department. 

PERTINENT FACTS' ABOUT THE YOUNG PEOPLE'S 
CONVENTION. 
Time: June 14th and 15th 
Place: St. Peter's, Washington, N. C. 
Leaders: Bishop Penick, 
Bishop Darst, 
Rev. A. R. McKinstry, 
Rev. F. D. Dean, 
Rev. Stephen Gardner, 
inspiration. Consecration, Business and Recre- 



Prcgr;\ni 
ation. 

Who May Attend: All youn 
All clergy. 

Expense: Registration fee, .$1.00 each. 



people 14 years and over. 



EAST CAROLINA YOUNG PEOPLE EXPECTED TO GO 
TO CAMP CAPERS. 

Dr. Dean asks the editor of this department to state that 
East Carolina has been given a quota of 20 persons for 
Camp Capers, Brevard, N. C, and he hopes soon to com- 
plete the personnel of those who will go from this Diocese. 
The camp will be held this year from June 17 to July 2. 
I'his is a camp for the Carolina dioceses, and has been 
officially adopted by East Carolina until the selection of its 
own camp site. "Write the Rev. F. D. Dean, Wilmington, 
for particulars. 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S CONtVENTION, JUNE 14th and 15th. 

After conference with the leaders and young people of 
St. Peter's Church, Washington, N. C, the Rev. Frank D. 
Dean, chairman of the Commission on Young People's Worlv 
has announced that the annual convention of the young 
people of the diocese of East Carolina will he held with 
St. Peter's Church on June 1-ith and 15th. 

A i)rogram that is filled to overflowing with inspirational 
addresses and provision for pleasure has been arranged. 
Announcement that the Rt. Rev. E. A. Penick, Bishop Co-ad- 
jutor of the diocese of North Carolina; and the Rev. A. R. 
McKinstry, of the National CouQCil; are to be two of the 
leaders and speakers insures a program of a high order of 
excellence. 

The Convention will open on Monday evening, June 14th. 
at 7:30, with a banquet in honor of Bishop and Mrs. Darst. 
Mr. Aubrey Parsley, president of the diocesan organiza- 
tion of the Y. P. S. L., will preside. After the banquet, 
which is to be a very happy occasion, a service of prepara- 
tion for the Holy Communion on the following morning is 
to be conducted by Bishop Penick. 

Tuesday, the 15th, will be a full day indeed. It will begin 
with a corporate Communion at 7:30 A. M. Bishops Darst 
and Penick will be the celebrants. At nine o'clock the 
opening business session will be held, with an address by 
Bishop Darst. During this session Mr. McKinstry will 
address the young people on the work of the national or- 
ganization. A constitution and by-laws will be adopted, 
committees will report, officers elected for the coming year. 
An interestng feature of the morning program will be a 
Question Box. The young people are invited to bring their 
problems, so that a solution may be found. 

At 2:30 in the afternoon the young people will make a 
pilgrimage to Bath, where Bishop Darst will make an ad- 
dress in old S't. Thomas' Church, and institute the new 
officers. 

From Bath, everybody will go to Bayview, a beautiful 
resort place. H'ere the "fun" will begin. Stunts will be 
given by each League, under the direction of Dr. Dean, 



chief fun-maker; and Mr. Gardner, song leader. Each 
branch of the League is expected to put on a stunt. At 
twilight, a basket picnic will be held. After the picnic, 
the entertainment of the delegates and visitors will be in 
the hands of the young people of Washington, and that in 
sures a continuance of a good time. 

Every League is asked to elect two official or voting 
delegates, so as to expedite elections, etc. 

All young people in the Diocese 14 years of age and over 
are expected, and urged to attend. This includes all of the 
clergy. A registration of $1.00 will be charged, this amount 
to be used to defray necessary expense. 



ANSWERS TO CROSS-WORD PUZZLE IN APRIL MIS"- 
SION HERALD. 

HORIZONTAL. 

1. S'tand for the Bible. Lectern. 

2. Black Robe worn by the Choir; Cassock. 

3. Name of First Wednesday in Lent. Ash. 

4. Sign of a degree: Hood. 

5. Music sung by Choir during receiving of alms: Offertory 

6. The Greatest Feast Day of the Church: Easter. 

7. The Communion Cup: Chalice. 

8. A familiar symbol meaning "Jesus Savior of men"; 
I. H. S. 

9. Seats in the Church: Pews. 

10 White Robe worn by the Choir: Cotta. 

11. Chi Rho (Greek): X. P. 

12. Money received during a S'ervice: Alms. 

13. Third Church Season: Epiphany. 

14. A form of praise: Hymn. 

15. The forty days before Easter: Lent. 

16. Black robe worn by a Bishop: Chimere. 

17. Ruling body of men in a Church: Vestry. 

18. White Robe worn by a Minister: Surplice. 

19. Ornamentation back of the Altar: Reredos. 

VERTICAL. 

1. A general supplication: Litany. 
11. The Communion Plate: Paten. 

20. Shelf for the Elements: Credence. 

21. The first Church Season: Advent. 

22. The Communion Table. Altar. 

23. The head of a Diocese: Bishop. 

24. The Body of the Church which stands for "belief": Nave 

25. Priest's Altar Assistant: Acolyte. 

2. Church music, not a hymn: Chant. 

26. One who administers the "Lord's Supper": Priest. 

27. A minister's sign of office: S'tole. 

28. "Word of God": Bible. 

29. Place of Baptism. Font. 

30. Elevated part of the Church proper: Chancel. 

31. Cross Bearer: Crueller. 

32. Container for Purificators: Burse. 

33. Communion Wine Container: Cruet. 
14. Reverent: Holy. 

34. The portion of the Church within the Altar Rail: 
Sanctuary. 

35. White Robe worn by a Bishop: Rochet. 

36. So be it: Amen. 

37. Place from which sermons are delivered: Pulpit. 



We are publishing elsewhere in this issue of the Mission 
Herald a list of the apportionments given each church in 
the Diocese on the $7,000 pledged to the Thompson Orphan- 
age for the year 1926. It will be remembered that the dio- 
cesan Convention fixed on this amount as East Carolina's 
proportionate part of the support of this institution. Mr. 
Noe writes that the parishes heard from so far seem to be 
willing to accept their share. It will be left to the parishes 
to determine the best way of raising the amounts. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



15 



Convocation of Colored Church Woi kers 



-IN- 



The Diocese of East Carolina. 



THE REV. J. W. HERRITAGE, D.D. 
THE REV. J. B. BROWN, Secretary. 
THE REV. R. I. JOHNSON, Editor. 



NEWS OF COLORED CONVOCATION. 

The choir of St. Cyprian's Church together with friends 
in a motorcade of twelve cars went after morning service 
at St. Cyprian's Church on the second Sunday after Easter 
to St. Clement's Mission, Beaufort, Avhere our Easter Can- 
tata "Joy after Sorrow" was rendered in the afternoon at 
3:00. On former visits to Beaufort we have sung in the 
County Court House but on this occasion owing to repairs 
there we could not use it. But through the kindness of 
white friends we were permitted to sing in the white school 
auditorium A large gathering as usual greeted us half of 
whom were white citizens of Beaufort who expressed them- 
selves as very pleased with the rendition. A free will offer- 
ing of about $25 was given for the fund to repair S't. 
Clement's Mission. 

Here at St. Clement's is a building that in every way 
discredits our Church. It is in a most dilapidated condi- 
tion and must soon be conditioned in order to save what 
we have. Friends of the Colored Work who wish to help 
in a case of real need can certainly find a splendid oppor- 
tunity here at St. Clement's. Two faithful sisters, Mrs. 
Sutton and Mrs. Stanley under great difficulties are striving 
to carry on their little Parish S'chool and the Sunday 
School and nothing would give them greater encourage- 
ment in the work which they have fostered with what 
strength they have had for many years, than to see their 
Church in a more attractive condition. We celebrated the 
Holy f'ummunion there on the 2nd Sunday after Easts-; to 
a congregation which waiteu patiently though we were an 
hour and a half in arriving for the morning service. 

On April 29th a party of friends motored from Wilming- 
ton to visit us among whom was the Rev. Gustav H. Caution 
new rector of St. Mark's Church, Wilmington. We were 
delighted to meet Mr. Caution and to form the belief that 
in him St. Mark's has a man of God and an energetic and 
resourceful Pastor who will lead that splendid Parish to 
its rightful place in the Colored Convocation. May God 
abundantly bless both Priest and people. 

We can see why Mr. Holder with his nice group Bulletin 
which gives the news of his field may not feel disposed to 
send us news for this column but what shall we say of our 
brothers at Washington, Belhaven and Fayetteville? 
Friends, give us the help of your activities in this depart- 
ment which Mr. Partrick so generously grants us. He 
writes me as urgently for news as I implore you to send it. 



Among hospitals in this S'tate assisted by the Duke 
Foundation are the Church hospitals for Colored people 
at Charlotte and Raleigh: Good Samaritan and St. Agnes. 



In a special issue of the "Review of Reviews" devoted 
very largely to North Carolina and the South, Clarence Poe 
of the "Progressive Farmer" has the following to say about 
North Carolina and Negro Education: 

As evidence of the growing disposition to deal fairly 
with the Ne,gro it may be noted that North Carolina now 
provides better schools for its Negroes than it did for its 
whites 20 years ago. In fact. North Carolina spensd for 
educating its 700,000 Negroes twice as much as it spent in 
1903 for its 2,000,000 white and Negro population combined. 



DEATH OF PROMINENT LAYMAN. 



With regret we announce the death of Mr. Joseph A. 
Bright, a consecrated and generous-minded member of St. 
John Evangelist Church, Edenton In the passing away of 
Mr. Bright, our Mission has lost a faithful and devoted 
member. He was senior warden for years, always prompt 
in the discharge of the duties the office imposed upon him. 

For two years or more he has been in declining health. 
This became mere evident when in conducting the service 
as lay reader during the absence of the rector. He fell out 
from complete nervousness. He partially jecovered until 
six months ago when his physician ordered him to cease 
work. He rallied until the evening of Good Friday when 
his soul took its flight to God Who gave it. He leaves a 
mother, a devoV:!d wife and two children, David and Marion, 
to mourn their loss. S. N. G- 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas it has pleased Almighty God to call home cur 
fellow member Joseph A. Bright from this life to a life of 
peace. 

Whereas, As God is no Respecter of persons we bow in 
humble submission to His divine will. 

Whereas, We realize we have lost a devoted and conse- 
crated meraJjer of the church, we desire to record our deep- 
est sympathy for the family in their bereavement; there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That we, the Vestry of St. John Evangelist 
Church, do hereby express our sorrow at the great loss we 
have suffered in the removal from the scene of action, on^ 
who is dear to us, and do express our sincere participation 
with the family in their grief and sorrow. 

Resolved, That these resolutions be recorded upon the 
minutes of the vestry and that a copy be sent to the family 
and The Mission Herald. 

S. N. GRIFFITH, Rector 
HERMAN HATHAWAY, JR. 
JOSEPH BLOUNT, Treasurer. 
VIRGIL LEWIS, Secretary. 
ROBERT McCLENNY. 



Half a mule is wanted. Bishop Colmore has been prom- 
ised a horse and six cows, for the model farm which is a 
valual)le part of the mission work in Porto Rica, but his 
much needed mule has not yet made a successful appeal 
The Auxiliary at St. Thomas Church, Whitemarsh, Pa., has 
received $50 for the purpose and hopes before long to have 
enough small gifts to make up the other $50 necessary. 



Heroic effort of Ohio child. Cod liver oil, fifty cents a 
week for one dose a day, to secure money for the Easter 
offering! 



The Blount-Harvey Company, 



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GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



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President 



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Vice-Pres. & Treas. 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



^"^^-^ -^ 



OWN A SUMMER HOME at CAROLINA BEACH 

Carolina Beach is on the Main I>and. A Beach that you can drive your Automobile to the Water's edge, 
A good hard road from Wilmington. A new modern hotel now under construction that will be completed 
for the season of 1926. Lots are sold on reasonable terms and as an investment they are ideal. Informa- 
tion gladly given. Call or write any authorized representative. 

CAROLINA BEACH CORPORATION 

OWNERS AND DEVELOPERS OF 

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fet^-<^ 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WINSTON- SALEM- N. C. 

Walsh. Vice-President; 



Offices at CAROLINA. BEACH, N. C. 

OFFICERS: — S. C. Ogburn, President; W. F. Scbaffnei-, Vice-President; W. W. 

B. P. Yates, Vice-President; E. D. Turner, Secretary-Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS: S. C. Ogburn, S. C. Clark, A. V. Nash, W. F. Shaffner, E. P. Yates, E. D. Turner.W. W. Walsh 
J. L. BECTON, C. E., Wilmington, N. C. Engineer in charge of development. 
REFERENCES: Any Bank or Mercantile Agency.. 



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PASSENGER SCHEDULES EFFECTIVE MAY 2, '26. 
PLYMOUTH, N. C. 

DAILY. 

Leave 2:30 P. M. — Raleigh, New Bern, Beaufort, 
Goldsboro and intermediate points. Parlor car to 
New Bern. 

Leave 12:43 A.M. — Raleigh, New Bern, Goldsboro, 
I'eaufort, Charlotte, Fayetteville and intermediate 
points Sleeping car Ralei.gh to New Bern. 

Leave 12:30 P. M. — Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Parlor Car. 

Leave 4:00 A. M. — .Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Sleeping car. 

For tickets, Pullman reservations and other in- 
formation, address or apply to 

W. C. MILLER, Ticket Agent, 
Plymouth, N. C. 




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Cleaners, Dyers and Pressers. i 



Mail orders given prompt and careful 
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CALL ON 



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RESOURCES OVER FOUR MILLION DOLLARS 



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You will profit by trading with us. 



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THIS MONTH. 

The Bishop's Western Trip. 

News story of Y. P. S. L. Con- 
vention. 

News story of Conference on 
Evangelism. 

News of the Churches. 

Financial Statement. 



5une, 1926 




O 



yj 



Published by the Diocese of East Carolina at Plymouth, N. C. 



HMMt?pi^'^^MaaM^»L.w»a 




THE MISSION HERALD. 



uaint 9//ari/'a Ochool^ 

A JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Rev. WARREN W. WAY, Rector. 

An Episcopal Srhool for Girls. Four years High Scliool and two 
years College Courses. Accredited. Special courses: Music, Art, 
Expression, Home Economics, Business. 

MODERN EQUIPMENT— 20-AC RE CAMPUS. 

Advent session opens Sept. 15. 1925. For catalogue address: 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager, Raleigh N. C. 



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An elementary and preparatory school for hoys and girls 
Lovely location on coast of North Carolina; healthful cli- 
mate; comfortable roomte; wholesome food; daily prayer; 
preparation for college; athletics; piano; band and orchestra — 
— a home atmosphere fostered. 
Accommodation for 50 boarders. 

For further information apply to, 

MR. E. F. DUNCAN, Principal. 




Two Books You Should Buy Now 



1. Bishop William Temple's' "Personal Religion and the Life of 
Fellowship." This is the book recommended to the people of the 
Church for Lenten reading by the Bishop of London. 

2. The Rev. Dr. W. C. Bell's, "Sliaring In Creation." This is a 
book that will appeal to laymen who wish to learn how the results 
of modern scholarship contribute to the substance of the Chrisitan 
faith. 

Order now through the Mission Herald. 

Write the REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR., 

Plymouth, N. C. 




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The Mission Herald. 



Vol. XL. 



PLYMOUTH N. C. JUNE, 1926. 



No. 6 



THE BISHOP'S ACCOUNT OF HIS VISIT 

TO THE WEST 



THE BISHOP'S LETTER 



Owing to my absence from the diocese for five weeks, 1 
was unable to send a letter for publication in the May 
issue of The Mission Herald, but now that I am back in 
my own country and among my own beloved people I will 
try to make up for my silence by telling you something of 
my trip to the far west. 

In my last letter I stated that I would probably be very 
busy during the month of April, and my prophecy proved 
to be correct. During that month 1 preached and Con- 
firmed in The Church of The Good Shepherd, St. Paul's 
and St. James' Church, 'Wilmington, and in St. Paul's, 
Greenville; St. James', Ay den; Christ Church, Elizabeth 
City; St. Stephens, Goldsboro; our new Mission in Mount 
Olive, and the Pikeville Mission. 

I- also had the privilege of attending the Conference on 
Rural Work in S't. Paul's, Greenville; a special meeting 
of the Board of Trustees of St. Mary's School in Raleigh, 
and a Congregational meeting in St. Paul's, E.denton. 

On Thursday the twenty-second of April I had the privi- 
lege of speaking to the Piedmont Assembly of the Brother- 
hood of St. Andrew in St. Martin's Church, Charlotte. 

THE WESTERN TOUR. 

On Tuesday, April the twenty-seventh, I started on my 
tour in the interest of the National Commission on Evan- 
gelism. 

My first Conference was held in Atlanta, on April twenty- 
eighth, and I left that city feeling that our plans had the 
cordial and hearty approval of Bishop Mikell and the 
Clergy of his diocese. 

On the following day I had a most helpful Conference 
with Bishop S'essums and a number of the Clergy and 
laity of the City at a dinner meeting in Trinity Parish 
House, New Orleans. 

Leaving New Orleans on the Southern Pacific Thursday 
night, April twenty-ninth, I arrived at the attractive little 
City of Bl Paso, Texas, on Saturday morning. May the first. 

My object in stopping in El Paso was aot only to break 
the long journey to the West Coast, but especially that I 
might have a conference with my old friend the Rev. B. T. 
Kemerer, rector of St Clement's Church, Bl Paso. It was 
good to see Mr. Kemerer again, and my conference with 
him was most helpful to me. 

Leaving Bl Paso the next morning I reached the won- 
derful City of Los Angeles the following day, and after 
a night there I went on to Long Beach, California, in time 
for the opening service of the Synod of the Pacific on May 
fifth. 

I had the great privilege of preaching the sermon at the 
opening service,, and of making an address on Evangelism 
the following day. On the third day of the Synod I ad- 



dressed the Woman's Auxiliary of the Synod on the same 
subject. Long Beach might well be called "the Atlantic 
City' of the Pacific Coast, and is a most attractive seaside 
city. Among the old friends whom I saw in Long Beach 
was my dear friend, Chaplain B. F. Huske who is stationed 
at S'an Pedro near Long Beach. "Thollie's" mother, father, 
and sister were spending a few months with him, and I 
felt that I was in a very cordial and loving East Carolina 
atmosphere when 1 went to their temporary home in Long 
Beach. 

Saturday the eighth, was spent in traveling over the 
beautiful Coast route from Los Angeles to San Francisco. 

On Sunday, the ninth, at eleven o'clock I preached to 
a splendid congregation in Grace Cathedral, San Francisco, 
and that evening 1 had the pleasure of taking dinner with 
some East Carolina friends, Mrs. Williams, of Red Springs, 
and her daughter Mrs. Heath. 

On Monday, the tenth, I took a six hour railroad journey 
to Fresno Cal., the See City of Bishop Sanford, of the 
Missionary District of S'an Joaquin, where i apoKe to 
one hundred and fifty people at a dinner In the Cathedral 
Parish House. Arrangements for this dinner meeting 
had been made by Dean MacDonald, a member of our Com- 
mission. 

Returning to San Francisco that night I spoke to a group 
of Clergy and laity of the city at a luncheon meeting on 
the eleventh. That afternoon I went to San Jose, Cal., 
where I spoke at a meeting of the San Jose Convocacion 
that night. 

The next morning I went on to Sacramento, See City 
of Bishop Moreland of the Diocese of Sacramento, when I 
spoke to a group of the Clergy and laity of that diocese 
that afternoon and again at a Reception that night. 

Leaving Sacramento on the night of the twelfth, I reach- 
ed Portland, Oregon, on the morning of the fourteenth and 
spent two busy days in that city, speaking three times to 
diherent groups on the fourteenth and once on the 15th. 
These engagements included two luncheons and one big 
dinner. 

On Sunday, the eleventh, I preached in St. Mark's 
Church, Seattle, in the morning and at a mass meeting in 
Trinity Church, Takoma, that night. 

On Monday, the seventeenth, I spoke to a group of the 
Clergy and laity of Seattle at a luncheon in the College 
Club. 

Tuesday, the eighteenth, was spent in Spokane, where 
I addressed a group of the Clergy and laity at a luncheon 
meeting and held a Conference with the Clergy in the 
afternoon. 

Leaving Spokane that night, I reached Minneapolis on 
the night of the twentieth where I spoke to a group of 



THE M1S810N HERALD. 



the Clergy and laity at a dinner meeting in the Minnesota 
Club, St. Paul, on the night of the twenty-first. From Min- 
neapolis I went on to Chicago. 

On Sunday, the twenty-third, I preached in S't. Paul's 
Church, Chicago, in the morning, and St. JLuke's Church, 
Evanston, that afternoon. 

On Monday morning, the twenty-fourth, I spoke to about 
fifty of the Chicago Clergy in St. James' Parish House, and 
at twelve-thirty 1 spoke to a large group of the Clergy and 
laity at a luncheon in the Union League Club. 

From Chicago I went on to St. Louis where I spoke to 
a large congregational meeting in the Church of the Ascen- 
sion on the night of the twenty-fifth. 

On the twenty-sixth, I had a conference with the clergy 
of this city in the afternoon, and spoke to a large group 
o£ the Clergy and laity at a dinner meeting in the Cathedral 
Parish House that night. 

From St. Louis I went on to Richmond where I had a 
Conference with the Clergy of that city on S'aturday, the 
twenty-ninth. 

From Richmond I came to Wilmington, reaching here 
on the morning of the thirtieth, and it was indeed good 
to be home again after nearly five weeks of constant travel- 
ing and speaking. During my absence I had traveled about 
seven thousand miles, and while the trip had been a very 
strenuous one, I was happy in the thought that it had been 
absolutely worth while. 

The response to my appeal for a spiritual Crusade was 
really very wonderful, and I was assured that the plans of 
our Commission would have the hearty and loyal co-opera- 
tion of the Bishop, Priests and laymen to whom the plans 
were presented. 

The task before our Commission is a tremendous one, 
and it will tax us to the utmost to bring it to completion, but 
I believe more firmly than ever that God is with us as we 
plan and as we work, and that He will bless us and use 
us as we go forward in the work for the extension of the 
Kingdom of His Sou. 

The need is great and only a church filled with the 
spirit of power — charged with a passion for the souls of 
men conscious of its great mission can meet t'nat need. 

God grant that the Church in East Carolina may play 
its full part in the crusade for souls, in their effort to lift 
humanity to the height of noble living and unselfish ser- 
vice, in this onward march which must never end until 
Christ reigns supreme in a world that needs Him so sadly. 

Faithfully, Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS' C. DARST. 



worked because of the very good road connecting the two. 
For the time being the Bishop and Council will noi re- 
|)lace the Archdeacon. — Asheville Citizen. 



REV. J. H. GRIFFITH, ARCHDEACON, WILL GO TO 
LENOIR PARISH. 



.1. H. Griffith, Archdeacon of the Western Diocese of 
North Carolina, resigned to the Bishop and Council the 
archdeaconate to take effect on June 1, in order to accept 
the rectorship at Lenoir, N. C. Archdeacon Griffith said 
that he felt that there was a wonderful opportunity for 
him to develop that church and also the one at Wilkesboro. 
There are two parishes in connection with this church, one 
at Ronda and one just outside Lenoir. He will give up his 
home here and take residence in Lenoir about June 1. 

The Bishop and Council passed a standing resolution of 
grateful thanks and appreciation of the splendid work that 
Archdeacon Griffith has done in this diocese and stated 
that they only let him go to Lenoir and Wilkesboro because 
these two places were in need of a man of his vigorous 
type and ability. They have both been vacant for several 
years, except for short intermittent services, and it is be- 
lieved that now, under the impulse of the splendid growth 
that both of these towns are making, with the vigorous 
work that Archdeacon Griffith is capable of doing, splendid 
results will be obtained. The two parishes can be easily 



NE'WS FROM GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 



(By Miss Bessie Haydn.) 

Our Rector preached the Biaccalaureale S'ermons this 
.\ear at L,ewiston, Wcodviile, Benson, and Scotland Neck, 
->. C. rie aiso preacned to the Knight Templars at Wilson, 
c.ad lectured to tne S'cottish Rite Masons at Raleigh, N C 

our dunaay School continues to thrive under the leader- 
.bUip 01 superintendent Cnas. O'H. Home. The average 
attfciutanLe is new over lOU. The Adult Biole Cla^s, taugnt 
ijy oenator F. C. Harding, is an outstanding feature of the 
;^.aooi, and is steadily growing in interest and in numoers. 

The class of Mrs. R. Williams held a banquet two weeks 
ago inviting the Rector and Mrs. Cook, Superintendent 
and other iriends. It was quite a success, and the class 
inienos to make it an annual affair. About torty sat down 
10 the festive board. 

The Rev James E. W. Cook, Mrs. Cook, and Miss Mar- 
garet have gone on a trip North to be gone for the whole 
mcnth of June. Our Rector has to report at the Kelly 
Hcspital, Baltimore, Md., and we all hope he will receive 
his discharge as "cured". While in the North Mr. and 
xUis. Cook will visit their children at Camden, N. J., Echo 
r-arK, N. J., and Atlantic City, N. J., and aiso take in the 
t'esqui Exposition at Philadelphia. We wish for them a 
happy vacation and a safe return home. 

Our Sunday school is using the Little- Cross and Crown 
tins and Sunday, June 6th, will mark our second year. 
At this time about eight or nine Wreaths will be distrib- 
uted, which represents two years attendance without miss- 
ing. I think the pupils should be congratulated on this 
fine habit of attending Church School. We will also have 
about nine or ten delegates to the Young People's meeting 
in Washington, N. C, June 14 and 15. We also have one 
delegate to Camp Capers — Miss Eloise Hyde. 



SEWANEd SUMMER TRAINING SCHOOL. 



As fine as the program of the Sewauee Summer Training 
Scnool always is, that tor 1926, August 11th to 25th, sur- 
passes ail previous years. Among the notable features will 
be; Lir. Burton Scott Easton, Professor of xNew Testament 
Interpretation, General Theological Seminary, New York, 
on Tlie Lite of Christ; Rev. Bertram E. Brown, nationally 
known for his work at Tarboro, North Carolina, on "The 
Church and The Rural Problem"; Dr. Lewis B. Franklin, 
V ice-President of the National Council, on Courses for Ves- 
tiynien and Secretaries; Dr. John W. Wood on Missions; 
Jjean C. L. Wells on China, Irom which country he has just 
returned; J. H. Steuterman on Church Music; Mrs. Joseph 
R. Wheeler on Woman's Work and Leadership; Rev R. 
Cary Montague of Richmond, Virginia, on Christian Social 
Service. 

Other members of the faculty include Miss Mabel Lee 
Cooper, National Department of Religious Education; Mr. 
Lean C. Palmer, Secretary Brotherhood of St. Andrew; Dr. 
Gardner L. Tucker, Dr. Homer W. S'tarr, and Miss Annie 
iiioiton Stout, of the Province of S'ewanee Education 
S'taft; Mrs. F. N. Challen, Y. P. S. L. leader of North Caro- 
lina; Miss Christine Boylsqton, Rev. G. Croft Williams, and 
Rev. Lewis N, Taylor, authorities on Social Service. 

A full line of credit courses for the National Accredited 
Teachers' Association will be given. 

The School of the Prophets will be under Dr. J. S. lUint- 
ing with a comi)etent staff of assistants. 

A full program may be secured from the Secretary, Mi; ;. 
Emma Twiggs, Christ Church, Savannah, Georgia. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



COMPELLING WORDS BY BISHOP GREEN. 



"Over and over again I have, been compelled to point 
out how our best laid plans and dearest Diocesan hopes 
wait on the financial means to do the work. In our budget 
and program we shall see the dream expressed in words 
and their cost in terms of money. But the money is only 
a symbol. The budget and program is a challenge to our 
consecrated loyalty and to our sacrificial devotion. The 
money symbol is but a convenient and concrete means of 
challenging your personal devotion. A man's money is after 
all but one of the symbols of himself. When the Church 
asks your money she is really asking for yourself; not yours 
but you. She asks your money as a representative of your- 
self. But the cold fact still stands that as this world is 
ordered today, the Church's work waits on the money to 
pay her honest bills; the Church's workers cannot live on 
charity doles but must go forth to their work in self-re- 
specting support. Our worlf must continue to be but labor 
and sorrow, our dreams must vanish in disappointment 
ana heartbreak, until a converted people have seen the vis- 
ion of sacrifice and of service in Christ's name through His 
Church and have properly valued the privilege of laying 
themselves with their money, and their money with them- 
selves, upon the altar of her service. The program repre- 
sents that challenge, and after all a challenge to a mini- 
mum rather than a maximum. May we think of it in terms 
of our duty and privilege in Christ's name, who died for 
us." 

From the Annual Address of the Bishop Coadjutor of 
Mississippi. 

STATEMENT OF AMOUNTS PAID ON APPORTION- 
MENTS' FOR THE CHURCH'S PROGRAM- 
DIOCESAN AND CrENERAI^TO 
JUNE 7TH, 1926. 

FIRST. 
Apportion- 
Location and Parish. ment. 

Edenton, St. Paul's $3000 . 00 

Wilmington, S't. James' 11040.00 

Woodville, Grace Church .500.00 

Burgaw, St Mary's 100. 00 

Winterville. St. Luke's 200.00 



Paid by Paid by 
Parish Ch. School 
$1259.76 $100.00 



I 



SECOND 

Creswell, St. David's $ 700.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 2415.00 

Fayetteville, S't. .Tohn's 4300.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's..... 1500.00 

Greenville, St. Paul's 2100.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 1170.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 2500 . 00 

New Bern, Christ Church 4000.00 

Plymouth, Grace Church 1000.00 

Washington, S't. Peter's.. 4500.00 

Wilmington, St. John's 3000.00 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 1995.00 

Windsor, St. Thomas' 800.00 

THIRD 

Ayden, St. James' $ 320.00 

Beaufort, S't. Paul's . . 600 . 00 

Belhaven, S't James' 500 . 00 

Bcnnerton, St. John's 100.00 

Clinton. St. Paul's 400 . 00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's.... 250.00 

Hamilton, S't. Martin's 200.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 350 . 00 

Scuthijort, St. Philip's 250.00 

William^ton, Church of Advent 500.00 

Winton. St. John's 200.00 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 300.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel ...... 530,00 



4305.86 

31.32 
100.00 

$110.00 
950.00 

1100.00 
447.00 
250.00 



880.02 
61.00 

26.00 
$125.00 



25.00 
850.00 
100.00 
1500.00 
939.05 
417.12 

35.00 

$50.00 
250.54 
148.75 
8.35 
162.05 



61.64 
200.00 
133.09 

50.00 
454.29 

75.00 

411.86 

182.55 

8.59 

76.70 



100.S5 
75.00 



115.28 



78.0] 
100.00 

52.17 
18.70 
40.00 
45.00 
100.00 
35 . 00 
15.00 
50.00 
76.72 



Apportion- 
Location and Parish. ment. 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 125 . 00 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 200.00 

Warsaw, Calvary 80.00 

Whiteville, Grace Church 90.00 

Yeatesville, S't. Matthew's 100.00 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 100.00 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's 70.00 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 60.00 

FOURTH 

Atkinson, St. Thomas'.. $ 100.00 

Aurora, Holy Cross 500.00 

l^ath, St. Thomas' 100 . 00 

Chocowinity, Trinity 100.00 

Fayetteville, S't. Joseph's 200.00 

Griffon, St. John's 250 . 00 

Hope Mills, Christ Church... 150.00 

.lessama, Zion 275 . 00 

Lake Landing, St. George's.. 250.00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 400.00 

Red Sprin,gs, S't. Stephen's.. 100.00 

Feven Springs, Holy Innocents' 240.00 

Vi'nceboro, St. Paul's 100.00 

Wilmington. Good S'hepherd. 300.00 

Wilmington. St. Mark's 400.00 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 150 . 00 

Bunyan, St. Stephen's.. 25.00 

Fdenton, St. John's 150.00 

Edward, Redeemer 25.00 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's... 50.00 

Fairfield, All Saints' . . 35.00 

Faison. St. Gabriel's ' 50 . 00 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 50.00 

Lumberton. Trinity .. 1>I0.00 

Maxton. S't. Matthew's 50.00 

North West, All Souls' 50 .00 

Sladesville. S't. John's 30.00 

S'unbury, S't. Peter's 100.00 

Trenton. Grace Church. ..... . 125.00 

Washington, St. Paul's 250.00 

Wrightsville, S't. Andrew's... 100.00 

Aurora, St. Jude's 100.00 

Ayden. S't. Thomas' 45 . 00 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 40.00 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 100.00 

Greenville. St. Andrew's 125.00 

Jfsper, St Thomas' 50.00 

Kinston, Christ Church 75.00 

Mnrfreesboro, S't. Barnabas'.. 50.00 

Oriental, St. Thomas' 25.00 

Pikeville. Mission 50.00 

Pollocksville, Mission........ 48.00 

Robersonville. Mission 25.00 

Roper. St. Ann's 60.00 

Haddocks X Roads. St.S'tephen's 130.00 

Williamston, St. Ignatius' 30.00 

Wilmin.gton, "Brooklyn" Miss. 15.00 
Wrightsville, 

"McCumber's" Mission.. 20.00 

Farmvillle, Mission 15.00 



$55983.00 



Paid by 


Paid by 


Parish Ch. S'chool 


70.00 


17.55 


66.00 






25.00 




35.00 


55.00 


11.49 


42.15 


7.21 


10.50 


2.15 


$ 


$ 




55.00 


18.95 


4.75 




14.03 




20.00 


50.00 




32.00 


20.00 


14.98 


23.40 


24.60 




190.00 


50.00 




12.40 


22.50 






7.24 


83.30 


281.00 


115.12 


10.00 


2.00 





35.00 

3.60 

25.00 
20.00 
25.00 

1.00 



50.00 
10.00 

12.97 



5.00 



18.75 

7.00 
15.00 

10.00 



18.00 


5.00 




42.00 


6.91 


9.46 


45.88 


54.77 


9.00 


6.00 




10.25 


10.00 




15.00 




26.00 




31.25 


30.00 


21.00 





5.56 



8.32 
5.00 



An old French dictionary, a very ancient one, giving the 
French word for "muddy", gives also examples of the use 
of that word. It says that "muddy as an Archdeacon" was 
a proverbial saying. That was because in the old ancient 
times every archdeacon was booted and spurred; he spent 
most of his time riding up and down the diocese and 
was splashed with mud like any hunting parson. — ^Londoij 
Diocesan Magazine. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



CONFERENCE ON EVANGELISM AROUSES GREAT 
INTEREST. 



GROUP OF CLERGY AT ST. MARY'S HEAR FINE 
ADDRES'SES. 



(By Theodore Partrick, Jr.) 

A conference of greater helpfulness and spiritual value 
than the inter-diocesan conference on Evangelism at St. 
Mary's School, Raleigh, on June 8th and 9th, has not been 
held in North Carolina. The group of clergy from the dio- 
ceses of North Carolina and East Carolina was not large, — 
not as large as it should have been, — but it was a group of 
men very much in earnest, very teachable, and responsive 
to the spiritual challenge of the hour. The leaders of the 
conference were wisely chosen. It was to be expected that 
Bishop Darst would be one of the leaders, because of his 
chairmanship of the National Commission on Evangelism. 
Bishop Penick was no less inspirational, nor were any of 
the speakers and leaders. 

The conference was arranged bv the Rev. Messrs. C. O. 
Pardo and B. E. Brown, evangelistic leaders of the two 
dioceses All of the cler.gy present stayed at St. Mary's, 
and there were two full days of delightful fellowshin. It 
was a matter of great regret that Bishop Cheshire was un- 
able to attend, owing to his attendance at the commen'^e'- 
ment of the University of the South. 

The conference began on Tuesday morning, June 8th, 
with a celebration of the Holy Communion in the chaoel 
of St. Mary's. After breakfast, there was a morning full 
of addresses that insnired and discussion that brought out 
vital facts. Bishon Darst. the first speaker, outlined the 
program of the national commission, with particular refer- 
ence to the Bishop's Crusade. A period of nation-wide 
preparation this Fall is to be followed in Epinhany 1927 
with a great preaching crusade that is expected to arouse 
all parts of the Church to a sense of its evangelistic 
mission. 

One of the most inspiring preachers that has come to 
North Carolina in a lon.g time is the Rev. Charles L. Good- 
ell, representative of the Federal Council of Churches, who 
gave the first of his nddresses on "General Evangelism", 
following that of Bishop Darst. Dr. Goodell expressed 
great pleasure in the fact that the Episconal Church is tak- 
ing such great interest in the subject of evangelism, and 
assured his hearers that the sunnort of the cause by this 
great Church will have a fine effect. He stressed the fact 
that more use must be made of the laymen, and l^id great 
emphasis upon the necessity of personal work "We can't 
have a day of Pentecost until we are prepared for it," he 
said, and ursred such preparation. 

The Rev. W. J. Loaring Clark, one of the national mis- 
sioners of the Church, delivered on Tuesdav the first of 
two addresses on the preparation and work of the mission- 
er, Dr. Clark, who has been heard in East Carolina before. 
delivered addresses that were of the greatest practical help- 
fulness. Out of a large experience he told the Clergv where 
to lay the emnhasis and how to get the best results in 
the conduct of nrenching missions. Stressing the fact that 
the Church must be more evangelistic he amused his hearers 
by saying that "the Church is better at curin.g fish than 
at catching them." 

Tjcading a discussion on the Teaching Mission, the Rev. 
Tracy T. Walsh, of York, S. C. gave~7nanv helpful sugges- 
tions as to the methods and purposes of this kind of mis- 
sion. After lunch on Tuesdav the Rev. B. E. Brown, of 
Tarboro, snoke on "Rural Evangelism". Any one who 
knows of Mr. Brown's wide exnerience in this tyne of work 
and bis vivid and homely stvle of presentation will not be 
surprised to learn that it made a deep impression 

On Tuesday evening evensong was said in the chanel. and 
a meditation .given by Tfr. Goodell that gripped his hearers. 



Following this there was a round-table discussion on the 
.general subject of evangelism. 

On Wednesday morning therp was a celebration of the 
Holy Communion, with Bishop Darst as celebrant. The first 
period after breakfast was taken by Dr. Goodell, who again 
delighted his hearers. After him, Mr. Brown, gave the sec- 
ond of his addresses, "The Children's Mission." It was 
really not an address, but an actual demonstration, and 
proved of great interest. The Rev. C O. Pardo read a very 
comprehensive and interesting paper on "The Methods and 
]\Techanics of the Evangelistic Mission" Dr. Clark .gave his 
concluding address, and maintained the high level of inter- 
e;'t evoked by his first. 

In the afternoon Bishop Darst spoke a.gain on the 
"Bishop's Crusade." telling his hearers in detail of his re- 
cent visit to the West. Great interest was shown in his 
desc-ription cf his visit in the interest of Evangelism to 
the P<icifin coast and mid-west. Bishop Darst said that the 
outstanding impression which he received was the great 
interest and response of the laity. 

The meditation of evensong in the chapel was conducted 
by Bishop Penick. whose interpretation of the tasks and 
p'ivileges of the clergv was heard with the greatest interest. 
The concluding session at night was a round-table dis- 
'■upsion. 

Too much credit cannot be given all those who worked to 
make the conference a success. The work of Mr. Pardo in 
nr'aneing the program and looking after many details, 
and the work of the host, Mr. Way, deserves particular 
mention 



MR. GEORGE C ROVAl L "^l-ErTFO SENIOR WARDEN 
OF ST. THOMAS', BATH. 



The npwlv nnpointed Vestrv of St. Thomas' Churi^h. Bath, 
stnrted off with n fipo -,-nfl enthusiastic meeting nn the after- 
noon of Mnv !?3rd 0"t of a piembers^ip of twelve, tc^ men 
were pree^nt. Mr. George C Ro^'fll was elected S'enior 
wrqrden Mr. Wilson Tamb Jun'or Warden Mr C R Nick- 
erson, Se^ret^rv. and Mr H. N. Roner. Parochial Treasurer. 

.A roSQlntinp \i'"c! riciSRofl Tplipvin"- tho Tnoal POTT'Tegntion 
cf the hiirrip-n nf roi-iniTc; fo fho Cbuf'^h nnd limitirsr their 
TPcnoTicibniti^ tn fTiPiV mrorTiiol !3Tid dio'^f'san hudfiTPf as 

berpto^'ore Thn lopni mprpi^ers of the Vestry were an- 
nointed a Coinmittcp to attend +n t>ie=e pffnirs. A building 
committee was appointed and ipstru^ted to proceed with 
repairs to ihc nhumh at once The Treasurer of the Asso- 
f^iation for the Re'^t'^ration and Preservation cf '^'t .Thomas' 
Church reported $T7?, in band. This sum is not sufficient 
to Put on the greatlv needed roof. We wish there could 
he further subscription to about $350 at once. This would 
enable us to put the Church in .good condition before the 
fall. 

Mr Royall struck a fine note and started a great move- 
ment, we believe, when he volunteered to give four services 
a year in St. Thomas' and challenged the other vestrymen 
to follow him that this ancient church might have contin- 
uity of services. Four others accepted the challenge and 
twenty-two services, in addition to the Vicar's twelve, were 
pledged. Are there not other laymen, lovers of their 
Church and ready to serve the Master, who will volunteer 
to ioin this service staff? 

The relation of the Association for the Restoration and 
Preservation of St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, Bath, to 
this new and lar.ger Vestry shall be that of an auxiliary, 
doing its work through the Vestry. It shall be the policy 
of the Vestry to push the restoration of the building until 
it is restored as. near to its original appearance as possible, 
ever guarding against any change that would be out of 
keeping with the original architecture. We have started 
work with the idea of completing the restoration before 
19.T4 when we hope to celebrate the TWO HUNDREDTH 
ANNIVERSARY OF S'T. THOMAS'. 



THE MISSION HERAU). 



THE BIRTHDAY THANK OFFERING. 



(An address by Miss Anna Louise Robertson) 

The first Birthday Thank Offering was for Bishop Rowe's 
boat the Pelican No. 2, the amount raised was $8,126.00. 
This was presented at the General Convennou m l!^2i:. 
The second offering which was presented last faij 192u 
was for the Bishop Overs school for boys in Liberia aad 
was $22,426.77. The offering this year and for Liie n'.-xt 
two years which will be presented in 1&28 will ise tow;nd 
the Hooker School for Girls in Mexico City, Mexico. 

Over fifty years ago Mrs. Hooker, a widow jf a c)er4v- 
man opened her home to the motherless and fatherless 
children — soon it became a school and then it began to 
grow and it now has twelve grades and is in charge of 
Deaconess Newell. 

I want you to consider with me for a few minutes two 
pictures. The one on this side is a picture of the girls 
and boys of Good Shepherd Church School — they have com- 
fortable homes in them a mother and a father to love and 
take care of them and to see that they are properly nour- 
ished. These boys and girls have splendid schools to at- 
tend — they have a Church S'chool with loving teachers giv- 
ing their services to teach them of the real things of life. 

On the other side is a picture of the children of Mexico 
many of them fatherless, motherless and homeless. Those 
who have parents are not properly cared for because the 
mothers do not know how to do it. Many of the children 
of well-to-do families are undernourished. The majority 
of the people in this picture cannot read or write only 15 
out of every hundred. That is because the country in 
which they live has been at war so much they have not the 
money for schools. In the center of this pathetic picture 
of these sadly neglected children — God's children therefore 
our brothers and sisters — stands a school which is minis- 
tering to a large number of the girls — but there are also 
a great many on the outside of the high wall which sur- 
rounds the school waiting and anxious to get in. So eager 
are they for an education that they come for miles and 
miles only to be told they cannot get in because there 
is not money enough to build an addition to the school and 
in the already crowded building there is no room for them. 

The General Church is asking the boys and girls of the 
Church who are enjoying so many blessings and privileges 
to open the gates of Hooker School to their less fortunate 
sisters of Mexico. 

Will not you of Good Shepherd Church School do your 
part that you may have a share in swinging the gates 
wide. Remember it is a Birthday Thank Offering, it is to 
be given on the Churches Birthday, which is Whitsunday. 
You are asked to give a penny, a nickle, a dime or what- 
ever you wish for each year you are old as a thank offering 
to God for His goodness in sparing you another year and 
for the blessings of that year. Thankful that you are Amer- 
ican children and all that it means. 

Will not the children in this picture make some sacrifice 
to help the children in the other picture. Carry these two 
pictures home with you. Pray for these children, for Dea- 
coness Newell, for those on the inside that they may leave 
that school and go forward and win Mexico for Christ — 
pray for those on the outside that they may not give up 
hope and then join with your prayers your gift and help 
to open the gates of the Hooker School. 



ers with the importance of "Leaving all things with the 
spirit which was in Christ Jesus." 

Dr. Dean preached at the evening hour to an overflow 
congregation of the Methodist Church here. 



DR. DEAN AT WELDON. 



(Correspondence of News and Observer.) 
Weldon, May 31 — Dr. Frank Dean, of Wilmington, preach- 
ed the baccalaureate sermon for the graduating class of the 
Weldon high school in the school auditorium on Sunday, 
May 30, at the 11 o'clock hour, before a large and apprecia- 
tive audience. 

T^r. Dean in a. mo»t practieal maamer impreesed his hear- 



REVERENT VISITS TO ST. PAUL'S CHURCH YARD. 



PLANS' FOR VIRGINIA DARE MEMORIAL EXERCISES. 



Many visitors in their sight-seeing round;^, come to St. 
Paul's Church Yard, and into the Church. Among the most 
appreciative are the children, who have learned something 
of North Carolina Colonial History, in their school work. 
Attention to these calls has become increasingly exacting 
ol the time and the ability of the care-takers; it is hoped 
that good is thereby done. There is usually some expres- 
sion of respect and reverence for the sacred place and there 
is probably an increase of respect for those Old Timers 
who in 1736 built these walls so solidly, and designed this 
Church so symmetrically. This may tend to counteract 
the self-conceit of our day which thinks that WE know 
so much more, and that we do so much better than our 
G randfathers ! 

We, of St. Paul's, are made to appreciate the contrast 
there is between the ease and comlort of our occupancy 
of the good old Church, and the delay and difficulty of our 
getting into the new Parish House. As so often happens, 
questions of compliance with contract specifications are 
stow of adjustment; and thereby dedication of the Parish 
House is Held in abeyance. However, having access to it, 
we make use of it to a limited extent. On a recent Sunday, 
the children went into the Parish House to see it and to 
have a parting address from Archdeacon Drane just before 
his departure from Edenton to go to his Alaskan Mission 
field. To our distress, Mr. Drane was confined to his room 
by sickness, and we could not have him; but after a prayer 
by the Rector and a short address, the children were permit- 
ted to explore the building; and thus the children, who will 
have the longest use of the Parish House, were the first 
to use it. It awaits its furniture before it can be properly 
used. 

An occasion of interest to the Parish was Bishop Cheshire's 
special service and ministration of Confirmation recently, 
by invitation of Bishop Darst, We had a like visita- 
tion last year, and both of these were because of Bishop 
Cheshire's presence in Edenton to attend annual meetings 
of The Roanoke Colony Memorial Association. At this 
meeting the usual action was taken for the observance of 
the anniversary of the birth of Virginia Dare, 18th August. 

An unusually interesting programme of exercises will be 
offered, this year, with the British Ambassador as chief 
speaker. It is the earnest wish of this writer that the 
appropriation by Congress for a memorial to Virginia Dare 
may now go into the already collecting fund for a digni- 
fied memorial Gateway to Virginia Dare, and that the foun- 
dation of it may be laid at Old Fort Raleigh, next August. 
The Diocese of East Carolina is co-operating with the Roan- 
oke Colony Memorial Association for the erection of such 
a memorial, and the special fund is now about a Thousand 
Dollars, with Fifteen Hundred more promised by the 
Colonial Dames. The design for this Gate-way, has been 
accepted by the Joint Committee, and it has had the 
approval of many interested contributors. D. 

Edenton, N. C, June 14th, 1926. 



"The Londoner" in the London Evening News writes 
of Fulham, where the Bishop of London's Palace is located. 
He says the Bishops of London have been Lord's in Ful- 
ham ever since St. Erkenwald's days, which were more 
than 1200 years ago. In Fulham, says Domesday Book, 
the Bishop of London holds 40 hides of land. That land 
had been given to a Bishop of London nearly four eenturle8 
before the Norman ea^ne. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Xlbe /IMsston 1l3erall6. 

ORGAN OF THie DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly at 

PLiYMOUTH, NORTH CAROLINA. 



Subscription One Dollar A Year 

EDITORIAL. STAFF: 
Editor: 
REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR. 
Contributing Editors: 
RT. REV. THOMAS' C. DARST, D.D. 
REV. R. B. DRANE, D.D. 
REV. JAMES E. W, COOK, 
MRS. JAMES G. ?'TATON. 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 



NOTICE OF ENTRY. 
Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage, pro- 
vided for in Section 1103,Act of October 3, 1917, author- 
ized November 30th, 1918. 

aubscribers changing their addresses, or failing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Manager, giving 
when necessary, both the old and new addresses. 

Subscribers wishing to discontinue tneir suudciipiious 
should- so notify the Manager, as an absence of such notih- 
cation is considered a continuance of the subscription. 

All articles for publication should reach the Business 
Manager by the 25th of the month. New subscriptions, 
renewals, requests for change of address and copy for ad- 
vertisements should be sent to 

REV. THEODORE PARTRICK, JR., 
Plymouth, N. C. 

As usual, the Mission Herald will not be issued in July. 
It may become necessary to do away with the August num- 
ber also, in order to avoid a delicit at the end of the year. 
If circumstances allow, we will appear in August. If not, 
please expect the paper in September. We wish you a happy 
and a not too uncomfortable summer. T. P., Jr. 



THE CHURCH'S CALL TO BISHOP DARST. 

When it becomes known in the Diocese that the Churcli 
has asked Bishop Darst lo be away iioiu Kast Carolina tor 
a period of nine months or more, in order to direct the 
great evangelistic movement that is to be known as "The 
Bishop's Crusade," his people will contemplate such action 
with mingled feelings. They will miss aim greatly, and 
there will be fear ttiat the work in the Diocese will suffer 
by reason of his absence. Over against this will be the joy 
of sharing with the whole Church his splendid enthusiasm 
for the church's mission and his power to arouse people out 
of their spiritual lethargy. Clergy from far distant dio- 
ceses have remarked on the willingness of the people of 
East Carolina to share their Bishop with others, and they 
have said that we were making a real contribution in so 
doing. We know that whatever decision the Bishop makes, 
after consultation with his advisers, he will have the co- 
operation and the prayers of his people all over East Caro- 
lina. T. P., Jr. 



"SEWANEES RIGHT." 

iSewanee had always been a mystic word to us, and it 
was with eager hearts that we arrived there last week to 
attend the meeting of the Board of Trustees and the Com- 
mencement. We had heard of it all our lives, but could 



never grasp its full meaning. Its musical sound brought 
to our ears enjoyable, yet inueflnable imaginations, it was 
only by the sheerest accident tnat we did not go there tor 
our academic preparation tor the blessed ministry. Now 
and then we met a man trom there; occasionally we heard 
ot its atnletic teams conquering some powerful foe; some- 
times its literary societies went loith and triumphed over 
other educational institutions; and once upon a time we 
heard a renowned scholar. Dr. J. O. F. Murray, who had 
come to America trom Cambridge University, interpret tiie 
Soteriology of one of Sewanee s great sons, the Rev. Dr. 
UuBose. 

Any vagueness of definition began to vanish when we 
were within seven miles of Sewanee Mountain. We looked, 
ana behold! — there was a majestic white Cross, some thirty 
leet hign, standing upon the mountain, keeping guard over 
the interests of Sewanee. It was erected by loving hands 
10 commemorate S'ewanee's heroic dead of the late World 
War. But it does more than that. It is inherently em- 
blematic ot tue motif of Sewanee. Just thinK. of tne Cross 
of Christ being the dominating feature of an institution! 
Tiiat is why Sewanee is gloriously difterent trom most edu- 
cational institutions. It considers itself a handmaid of the 
Church, its Board of Regents, Board of Trustees, Officers, 
and Faculty are composed, for the most part, of clergy and 
prominent laymen ot the Church. Its policies are directed 
by the representatives of the Church, its objectives are tne 
Objectives of tlie Church; and it strives with the Church 
to educate our youth in tlie religion of Jesus Christ. That 
is the reason Sewanee so often conquers what appears to 
be a mightier foe. It conquers because its heart is pure. 
If you really desire unmii^igated hospitality, to feel the 
warmth of natural fraternity and spontaneous friendliness, 
to know the satisfaction of striving alter the highest in 
lite, to share in the building of laudable character, go to 
Sewanee. "Sewanee's right!" G.F.CAMERON, 

Ayden, N. C, June 15th, 1926. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS PAID IN MAY, 1926. 



Those paying one dollar: J. M. James, Mrs. M. Butt, 
Mrs. G. R. Little, W. M. B/utt, Mrs. Lassie J. Price, Mrs. 
Wm, L. Price, Mrs. Wallace S'utton, R. B. Martin, Dr. J. T. 
Hoggard, Mrs. W. G. Chapman, Mrs. W. B. Foreman, Mrs. 
D. G. McKeithan, Mrs. J. F. Masters, J. J. Galling, Mrs. W. 
F, Hastings, Mrs. Ed. Davis, Mrs. V. H. Finck, Mrs. T, S. 
Harney, Rev. G. F. Hill, Mrs. F. G. Jacocks, Mrs. S. H. 
Johnson, Mrs. T. C. Jones, Mrs. C. W. Melick, Mrs. J. B. 
Griggs, Mrs. J. C. B|. Ehringhaus, Mrs. J. T. Stephenson, 
Rev, J. W. Heyes, Mrs. E. C. Beaman, Mrs. R. T. Martin, 

A. S. Bynum, Mrs. J. L. S'hackleford, Mrs. Lizzie Griffin, 
Rev. F. N. Skinner, Mrs. T. E, Sprunt, H. A. White, Mrs. 

B. T. McBryde, Mrs. Wm. A. Williams, Mrs. W. Y. Sheppard, 
Mrs, C, R. Thomas, Rev. D. L. Gwathmey, Miss Mary Lee 
Long, Rev. J, R. Harding, Rev. Archer Bcogher, B, R. 
Huske, Mrs, M, D. Towe, J. C. B, Ehringhaus, Mrs. Paul 
Davenport, Mrs. W. H. Zoeller, Rev. H. A. Cox, Mrs, David 
Jones, Rev. E. N. Joyner, A, S'. Huske, Mrs. J. J. Simmons, 
Mrs. J. B. Pollock. Total $64.00, 

Those paying more than one dollar: Mrs, J, C. Dawson, 
$2.00; Mrs. Fred Schlez, $1.50; Mrs. J. P. Raines, $2.00; 
Mrs. E. L Roper, $2 00; Mrs. Wm. H. Long, $2,00; Mrs. 
B. T. Cox, $2.50: Mrs. J. D. Bell, $2.00; Mrs. R. B. Creecy, 
$2,00; Miss Amy Dawson, $2 00; Mrs. P, L, Bridgers, $2,00; 
J, P. Greenleaf $1,50. Rev. B. T. Jillson, $2,00; Mrs. T. G. 
Skinner, $2.00; Mrs. J, B. Flora, $2,00; Mrs. Furney Brock, 
$3,00. Total $30.50. 

Total for month, $84.50. 



The free use of Lausanne University and other buildings, 
including the Cathedral of Notre Dame, has been offered 
fo.' the World Conference on Faith and Order to be held 
in Lausanne, Swithzerland, In August, 1927. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Personal Items. 



Mauy tiieuds iu East (Jarolina will regiet lo learn thai 
tne uev. b\ J\. tKinner, tor many years a priest oi iJasl 
Carolina anU secretary ol tiie Uiocese, has been torced lo 
retire on account or nis health. He will live at Martin s 
ruiut, a. (J. it IS noyeu tnat nis health will improve. 



Tne \en. F. B. Drane, Archdeacon ot the Yukon, Mrs. 
Drane ana tneir young daugnter, reLurned this montn tu 
AlasKa, alter a nine months luriougu to the iStates. Great 
regret nas ueen leit over tne lact tnat Arcndeacon Jjrane s 
iieciitii nas not ueen good lor much ot tne time, i^rayers will 
be onered up lor a (juicK. and complete recovery. 



The Rev. J. E. Holder, of Kinston, was honored this year 
|jy being invited to preacn the baccalaureate sermon to tUe 
graduating class ot at. Augustine's achool, Kaleign, i\. G. 



Tne newspapers in i^umberton were enthusiastic in their 
praise of the annual sermon to the graduating class of the 
lOi.ai high scnooi, delivered by the Kev. VV. H. Milton, D.D. 



The state newspapers on June 14th carried an account 
ot a robbery of tne rectory of St. Paul's, VVinston-S'alem. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gribbin were not reported as losing any val- 
uables, though some valuable jewelry belonging to a friend 
staying in the house was taken. 



The principal address at the annual Memorial Day exer- 
cises in Wilmington this year was delivered by the Rev. 
E. VV. Halleck. Rector of St. John's Church. 



The Rev. C. O. Pardo, Rector of the Church of the Advent, 
Vv'illiamstcn, attended the meeting of the national commis- 
sion on Evangelism in Washington, D. C, on June 10th. 



The Rev. G. F. Cameron, of Ayden, attended the meeting 
of the Board of Trustees of the University of the South at 
S'ewanee, Tenn., from June 3rd to 8th. Mr. Cameron was 
elected a trustee at the last annual convention. 



The Rev. Stephen Gardner, Rector of St. Peter's Wash- 
ington, will spend his vacation, the month of July, at 
Blowing Rock. 



The Rev. E. T. Jillson, Rector of Holy Trinity, Hertford, 
preached the baccalaureate sermons to the graduating 
classes of the high schools in Edenton and Hertford this 
year, both on the same day. Mr. and Mrs. Jillson leave 
the first of July for an extended visit to relatives in Rhode 
Island. 



The Rev. G. P. Hill, Rector of Christ Church, Elizabeth 
City, preached the baccalaureate sermon to the graduating 
class of the high school at Plymouth on Sunday, JuniS' 6th. 



PROGRAM FOR PITT COUNTY FIELD DAY. 



The Pitt County, Field Day, which has come to be an 
annual event, is to be held this year at Green Wreath 
Park, near Farmville, on July Gth. The Program is as fol- 
lows: 

S'ong Service. 

Evangelism: Clergyman's Viewpoint, Layman's View- 
point. 

Publicity, an address by Mrs. W. O. S. Sutherland. 

Woman's Work in Relation to Diocesan Finance, Mrs. 
H. J. MacMillan. 

Problems and Perplexities of a Rural Clergyman, Rev. 
G. F. Cameron. 

Address, Rev. Edward Baxter, Wilson, N. C. 



CHURCH KALENDAR JULY-AUGUST-SEPTEMBER, 1926 



"O live ye by the Kalendar, 

And with the good ye dwell; 

The Spirit that came down on them 

Will Lighten you as well." — Bishop Coxe. 



July 



AU£ 



June 27 — Fourth Sunday after Trinity 
29 — St. Peter, Apostle 

4 — Fifth Sunday after Trinity 
11 — S'ixth Sunday after Trinity 
18 — Seventh Sunday after Trinity 
25 — St. James', Apostle 

1 — Ninth Sunday after Trinity 

6 — Transfiguration 

8 — Tenth S'unday after Trinity 
15 — ^Eleventh Sunday after Trinity 
22— Twelfth Sunday after Trinity 
24 — St. Bartholomew, Apostle 
29 — Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity 

5 — 'Fourteenth S'unday after Trinity 
12 — Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity 

CONGRATULATIONS. 



Sept. 



(Green) 
(Red) 
(Green) 
(Green) 
(Green) 
(Red) 
(Green) 
(White) 
(Green 
(Green) 
(Green) 
(Red) 
(Green) 
(Green) 
(Green) 



THE BEST STATEMENT EVER ISSUED. 

Up to June 1st the Church has broken all records for 
piiynientb. 

Forty-four dioceses out of ninety-eight to which quotas 
were given have paid in their full proportion of the budget 
to date. Not room enough to name them, look them up 
for yourself. Some new names in the honor column. 

The total payments are within $70,000 of the amount due. 

The payments for May were $148,500 in excess of the 
Dionthly budget quotas. 

We are ahead of last year by $283,949.30. 

The "Pay As You Go" plan is working. 

We have stopped paying interest on loans. 
Joyfully yours, 
LEWIS' Bi. FRANKLIN, Treasurer. 

Note: East Carolina has paid $4,066.00 on the amount 
due to June 1st of $3,900. 



WILMINGTON CHURCH WOMEN HEAR DR. DISOSWAY. 



S'T .PAUL'S WOMEN HAVE LAWN PARTY. 

On Wednesday, May 12th, in St. James' Church, Wilming- 
ton, N. C, Section B. of the Woman's Auxiliary of that 
church held their regular meeting. Representatives from 
the other Episcopal Churches were invited and a delightful 
evening was spent by all. Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan opened 
the meeting with prayer and spoke a few words of wel- 
come. Miss Gibbons and Miss Nash sang solos, and then 
Dr. Disoswa.y told us something about her preparation for 
Missionary work in China. She made us feel the hard ana 
weary hours of work and study she had spent, indeed here 
is one of those courageous ones, who has already passed 
through several years of labor, discouragement, self-abase- 
ment, in study and preparation, looking forward with joy 
and eagerness to a lifetime of work in the service of God. 
She has just received her pass-ports and lists of supplies 
she must carry with her. It was quite a revelation to us 
to know some of the things every missionary is supposed 
to have. 

Our good wishes and prayers will follow her wherever 
she is and may He grant us strength to "carry on" here 
as our faithful missionaries are doing in other fields. 

The women of St. Paul's Church, Wilinington, N. C, held 
a lawn-party on the lawn of the Church Friday, May 14th, 
from 7 P. M. to 10 P. M. The proceeds will go towards 
the new Parish House and quite a nice sum was realized for 
this, ice-cream cones, lemonade, cake and candy were sold 
and a grab-bag was much in evidence. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



MtETING OF NATIONAL COMMiSSiON ON EVAN- 
GELISM. 



Cliurcli, i\ew Beni, wouia be laappy to receive word of it, 
and to arrange tor its sliipment to Trenton. 



(By the Rev. (J. o. l^ardo.; 

The National Commission on r^vuuseiism, Bishop Darst 
CJiaiinian, met TJiursday, June ioiii, in Bisnop lluuse, Ca- 
tueurai Close, Washington, D. c. uu iuursuay night 
j:Jisiiup jjarsL delivered an adaitao ou ij^vaugeiism to the 
men aUeuding the College ol i^reacuers wnicu is Cfirried on 
as a Catnedral activity under tutj uirection oi Bisnop Knine- 
laiider. 

Ui interest to the Church at large will be the action ot 
the Commission on Evangeiiaui. nans lor tne eitective 
preparation and carrying gui ui tiie- programme lor ihe 
iJishop's Crusade were made witu suD-commitiees appointed 
to carry out the details. li.very Oidcese ot tne Church has 
been asKed to cooperate vvitn tlie iNaiional Commission in 
tills Spiritual Crusade which win begin in the early part ot 
iyz7. The Bishops ot eacu uiocese nave been requested to 
appoint a Diocesan Commission ou i<ivangelism to further 
tne work of preparation ihrougnout tne iNation. 

Interest in this great spiritual movement is seen every 
where. The church is reauy lor an active and earnest pro- 
gram of Evangelism, ine isational Commission has given 
nuich thought and aLtemion to the subject and every phase 
ot Evangelism is being developed. 

It is especially grainy ing lo note that plans lor a thorougn 
going tollow up ci Llie Crusade are being formed. It is 
not the desire or iniention of the Commission that the 
Ciusade should prove a big gesture and then pass into the 
realm of foigoLten movements. Rather it is the desire on 
the part ot uie Commission ihat ihe Bishops' Crusade will 
be tne beginning ot the great work of Evangelism and it 
is hoped tnat the Church will from this time onward carry 
on Evangelism by Bishop, Priest and Layman. 



MEMORIAL APPROVED FOR VIRGINIA DARE- 



(VVashiiigion Correspondent of News and Observer.) 
Washington, May 24 — ^Erection of a memorial on Roan- 
oke Island to Virginia Bare, the first white child born in 
America of English parents, was finally approved by Con- 
gress today. The bill which was introduced by Representa- 
tive Eindsay Warren, was called up tor consideration by 
Senator Lee S'. uverman and unanimously passed by the 
Senate this morning. The bill was passed unanimously by 
the House recently when Speaker Longworth gave it special 
consideration. 

The bill carries an appropriation of $2,500 for the erec- 
tion of a memorial to be chosen by the Secretary of War. 
Secretary Davis has assured Mr. Warren that the War De- 
partment will do everything in its power to have the memo- 
rial completed in time for a celebration of Virginia Dare's 
birth which will be held in August. Sir Esme Howard, the 
British Ambassador, has accepted an invitation to deliver 
the chief address upon the occasion. It is hoped that the 
memorial can be unveiled at that time. 

The president is expected to sign the bill within the next 
few days. 



CHURCH BELL WANTED- 



Have you a BELL? Grace Church, Trenton, has a small 
farm bell which has been in the belfry for many years. 
But it has served its time and lately become cracked, so 
that its cheery announcement of services is no longer pleas, 
ant or effective. 

There may be in some Parish in this Diocese, a bell 
which is not in use, and which could be placed in this bel- 
fry and again take up its mission of calling together the 
faithful to worship. If there is such an idle bell which 
could be put to work, the Rev. Guy H. Madara, of Christ 



ACTIVITIES OF YOUNG PEOPLE IN WILMINGTON 
CHURCHES. 



(Items from Wilmington Newspapers.) 

A most delighttul affair of lasc evening was the Indcor 
Circus at the cnurch of tne Good Shepherd which was given 
under the auspices ot the ioung Peoples' League oi the 
church. 

Besides moving pictures and an art gallery there were 
stunts uy tne toliowing: 

Lady with a thousand pockets. Miss Eugeuia Mason. 

Balloon Ascension, Miss Evelyn Edwards. 

'I'lgnt Rope Walker, Miss Jessie King. 

Man wlio eats under water, Tom Burriss. 

uareback rider, Harold Gibson. 

Ciown and ring master, Joe Taft. 

A parade by all the members of the league. 

Candy and ice cream were sold by the members of the 
Junior Churcn School service league during the evening. 



ST. JAMES SERVICE LEAGUE TO PRESENT TWO 
PLAYS. 

At St. James' Parish House on Monday evening at 8 
o clock, the Church School Service League will present 
■ 'tne ti ive i^^ields of Service." Following is the cast: 

A Iraveler — Adair McKoy. 

A Child — June Parker. 

Tne Parish — Dorothy Acee. 

The Community — Otis Goodwin. 

The Diocese — Harry Smallbones. 

'the Nation — Billie Robertson. 

The World — Robert Bowden. 

Presentation of "chart" to the rector by a member of 
the league. 

Vocal solo — Henry Nutt Parsley. 

"SPRING IN THE BROWN MEADOW." 

Cast: 

A Little Girl — Margaret Darst. 

A Squirrel — George MacRae. 

A Snow Bird — Jean McKoy. 

Raindrops; George MacRae, Isaac Grattiger, Calder Atkin- 
son, Billie Robertson, Harry Smallbones, Robert Bowden, 
Billie Townes, Billie Lippitt, Garnett Saunders, Jimmie 
Sprunt, Mike Walker, David Scott, Henry Emerson. 

Sunbeams: Alice Meade Cranmer, Virginia Toot, Jane 
Young Beery, Mary Beery, Leila Wootten, Eleanor Wright, 
Mary Elizabeth Cunningham, The Tiny Sunbeam — Alice 
Boatwright. The Tall Sunbeam — Catherine Cantwell. 

Spring — Em Green. 

Flowers: Florence Moore, Dorothy Acee, Mary Green, 
Mary Miller Boatwright, Annie . Empie Boatwright, Otis 
Goodwin, June Parker, Therba Dickinson. 

An Old Fashioned Garden — The kindergarten and primary 
department of the church school. 

Ushers — Boy Scouts. 

Music. 

Dear Public: You are cordially invited to attend. No 
admission charge will be made, and, if you wish, you may 
diop a silver offering in our loving cup, to help us buy ice 
and milk for needy children in our "community" during the 
hot summer months that are soon coming. 

Faithfully yours, 
CHURCH SERVICE LEAGUE OF ST. JAMES' CHURCH. 



One little Minnesota girl twelve years old has earned 
enough money, by making and selling candy, to put a crib 
in the nursery of the Sheltering Arms, a diocesan orphan- 
ago, and she promises to earn and contribute five dollars 
a year to maintain the crib. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



11 



Diocesan News. 



WHAT THE CHURCH IS DOING IN DIOCESE OF EAST 
CAROLINA. 



The Rev. Harold J. Lewis was ordained to the diaconate 
in St. Paul's Church, Wilmington, on Thursday. June 24th, 
St. ,Tohn the Baptist Day, by Bishop Darst. Mr. Lewis, a 
native of Clinton, has spent the past pear in the Theological 
Seminary in Virginia, and will resume his studies there 
next fall. H'e is a young clergyman of great jiromise. 



The foundation of the parish house for St. Peter's Church. 
Washington, has been laid and the work is progressing 
rapidly. All of the people of the parish are working en- 
thusiastically to raise funds for its erection. A splendid 
gift of $30,000 for this purpose has recently been made by 
Mrs. George H. Brown, of Washington. It is now planned 
to lay the corner stone on July 20th. 



Miss Minnie Leary, of Christ Church, New Bern, has 
been elected by the Department of Missions to the post of 
secretary to the Rt. Rev. Charles B. Colmore, Bishop of 
Porto Rico. Miss Leary sails shortly for her new post, and 
will make her headquarters in San Juan, where the office 
of the Bishop is located The good wishes of many friends 
in East Carolina will go with her. 



The following young people went with the Rev. Frank 
D. Dean to Camp Capers, Brevard, N. C. following their 
attendance upon the convention of the Y. P. S. L. in Wash- 
ington: Mr. Aubrey Parsley, of Wilmington: Mr. Goode 
Branch, of Burgaw, and Misses Henrietta Hay, Marian 
Myers and Elizabeth Taylor, of Wilmington: Lucile Hassell 
and Frances H'oyt. of Williamston; Mary Harvey Charles, 
Charlotte Grimes and Emily Shelburne, of Washington, 
and Eloise Hyde, of Greenville. 



THE "COMING HOME DAY" AT OLD ZION. 



Sunday. May 9th. was celebrated at Zion Church as 
"Coming Home Day" and was in every way a great success. 
Invitations were sent out to former members and friends 
of the Parish, and the response was greater than was antici- 
r^ated. Several hundred cnme from almost all over the 
Southeastern section of the State Aurora, Bonnerton, Hills 
Point. Chocowinitv. New Bern. Wilmington Washinarton 
Williamston. Yeatesville and Plymouth were represented 
there. Every seat in the Church was taken and those in 
nosition to know state that there were as many more on 
the outside. 

Rev. T. N Brincefleld a former Rector, nrf^ached the 
morninsr sermon and assisted the Rector in the Celebration 
of the Holy Communion. 

After the service a bountiful dinner was snread in the 
grove in front of the church and was en.i'oyed by the sev- 
eral hundred who gathered there. 

At 3:00 P. M, a good sized congroeatioTi gathered in the 
church for the ^nd service of the day. The Rev. Stenhen 
Gardner of St Peter's conducted this service and nre^ched 
the sermon. The Rector fould not he nresent at the lattor 
service as he was at the same hour nreaching at St. 
'Stenhen's, Bunvan, where the Charitable Brotherhood turn- 
ed out in a body. 



Neero Church neor>le who are deaf have their own 
church in St. T;ouis. Enhphntha Mission, under the care of 
the Rev. Dr. Cloud of St. Thomas' Mission. Dr. Cloud is 
the dean of all our missionaries to New York, and All 
Souls', Philadelphia, being the two larger. 



COMPLETED LIST OF DIOCESAN OFFICERS WOMEN'S 
ORGANIZATIONS. 



President Mrs. Henr.^ J. MacMillan, 118 South Fourth 
St., Wilmington, N. C. 

First Vice-President Mrs. Richard Williams. President 
Convocation of Edenton, 402 Green St.. Greenville, N. C:. 

Second Vice-President President Convocation of Wilming- 
ton, Mrs. S. P. Adams, 20 North Fifth St., Wilmington. N. C 

President Girls' Friendly Society Mrs. George Moulton 
Jr.. 90 E. Front St.. New Bern, N. C. 

Provincial Vice-President of the Order of the Daughters 
of the King Mrs. J. B Gibble, ."^ll Queen St., Wilmington 
N'. C. 

Correspondent Churcli Periodical Club Miss Harriett 
Xivon. Hertford, N. C. 

S'e^retary Guild of Ft. Barnabas for Nurses Mrs. T. C. 
D-irst, .510 Orange St., Wilmington, N. C. 

Executive Ser-retarv Church School Service T eqaue Mrs 
Wm. H. Von Eherstein. Box 1.53. Washington, N. C. 

Treasurer TTnited Thpnk Offering Mrs. James Grist ?t^- 
ton, 301 W. Main S't., Williamston. N. C. 

Box Secretary Mrs. L. J. Pcisson, 31S South Third St, 
Wilmin.ston, N C. 

Educntionil Secretary Convocation of Edentnn, Miss Mae 
Wood Winslow. Hertford, N. C. 

Pdu^-ational Secretary. Convocation of Wilmington, Mrs. 
T. S'. McNeil Lumberton. N. C. 

Secretary Mrs. Joseph N. Bynum. Belhnveu. N. C. 

Treasurer Mrs. Albert Hugh Worth. 301 Church Street 
Elizabeth City, N. C 

The list of speria] chnirmen is as follows- 

Missions: Mrs. Richard Williqins, Greenville, N. C: Mrs. 
S. P. .^dams. Wilmington. N. C. 

Reliarious Education: Miss Mae Wood Winslow. Hertford- 
Mrs. T. S. Mf^Nein. T>umberton, N. C 

Chrisian S'ocial Service: Mrs. Jarle Bowers, Washing- 
ton. N. C. 

Publicitv: Mrs. W O. S. Sutherland Wilmine:ton, N. C. 

Field: Mrs J. B. Cranmer. Wilmington. N. C, 

F. T. O. Treasurer: Mrs. James G. Staton Williamston 
N. C. 

Box S'er-retary- ATrq. T ouis J. Poisson. Wilmin°ton v c 

Convocation of Wilminorton. Box Secretarv: Mrs Lei^h- 
ton Huske. Fnyptteville. N. C 

Convof>ation of Fdenton. Box Secretary: Mrs. P T. An- 
tlioTiv. Gref>nvillp. N. C. 

Ctinrch Periodical Correspondent: Miss Harriet Nivon. 
H'prtford. N C. 

Old Gold and c^ilvpr: Mrs G. 4 .Tone« Tr'armviUe. N. r 

Cornoratp Gift: Mrs. GporsTP F-rank Hill. Elizabeth Citv. 



DR. DISOSWAY TALKS TO YOUNG GIRLS. 



The Girls' Friendly S'ociety and Girl Scouts of Mason- 
bero Sound, East Carolina, held a particularly successful 
missionary meeting on the 10th of May. The speakers were 
Dr. Lula Disosway, of New Bern. N. C, intern at the James 
Walker Hospital and Miss Sue Hall. Both talks bore on 
China. Dr. Disosway having completed her medical train- 
ing, exiiecting to sail for Shanghai in August, to do mis- 
sion wcrk and Miss Hall, having spent a year in China 
teaching. The value of these meetings was brought out 
v;hen it developed that Dr. Disosway had been inspired 
and reached her decision to become a mlssionarv at .iust 
such a meeting of the Girls Friendly S'ociety. This gave 
a thrill to the girls present. Miss Hall proved herself a 
charming story teller holding her listeners' wrapt atten- 
tion. At the close of the meeting an offering was presented 
to Dr Disosway to use in her work, thereby cementing the 
ties formed during the afternoon and presaging a warm 
future interest in all that she does jn China, 



12 



THE MISSION HEKALD. 



NEWS OF CHRIST CHURCH, NEW BERN. 



THE WORK IN LIBERIA. 



(Items taken from Christ Church Tidings.)' 
The women of the Guild are continuing their good work 
in suppl.ving sui)i)ers, under the leadership of Mrs. H'ahn. 
The largest effort in this line was the splendid supper served 
for the opening of the Chamber of Commerce drive, when 
more than 150 guests sat at the tables and enjoyed the 
splendid meal prepared for them. The Guild is now organ- 
izing its plans for the supper and the booths at the Parish 
Bazaar to be held next December. If everybody in the Par- 
isn will do something this Summer to make articles for sale, 
or ask their fqends to make them during the S'ummer vaca- 
tion season, the Parish Guild's booth will be one of the 
largest. Formal meetings for the Summer have ceased and 
the hard working members look back to a season of effort 
and results. 

ALTAR GUILD. 

The members of this Guild do their work without much 
knowledge on the part of the congregation, of the many 
details involved. It is a pleasure to speak of the way in 
which the Sanctuary is kept clean and neat; the altar cloths 
and linens always ready; the flowers placed on the altar, 
and the vessels prepared for the Rector's use before every 
service. Constant care is required, and the reverent man- 
ner in which these duties are performed, merits a word of 
praise. 

CHURCHYARD SOCIETY. 

The Society is rejoicing in the beginning of the endow- 
ment fund for the upkeep of the Churchyard, and is greatly 
encouraged to go on in their work with renewed energy. 
The well-kept grounds are a credit to the Parish, and make 
a restful vista for all who pass by, or work in the stores 
and offices on both streets. 

GIRLS FRIENDLY S'OCIETY. 

May 3, the Girls' Friendly S^ociety met at supper in the 
Parish House and held a short business session. It was re- 
ported that our branch had paid its full quota of $127.50 
for the National Girls' Friendly House which is to be erect- 
ed in the city of Washington, D. C. After the business meet- 
ing, Miss Sadie Block, in a short speech, presented to Miss 
Minnie T^eary, who was present as Branch Secretary for 
the last time before sailing for Porto Rico, a beautiful leath- 
er writing case, fitted with stationery and ready for use. 
Miss Leary, in accepting ij. spoke of the pleasure she had 
always had in working with the members of this society, 
and expressed the hope that when she returned, she would 
find the Society of Christ Church grown larger and better 
in every way. 

The members of the Rbciety are rejoicing in the accept- 
ance by Mrs Robert DuVal .Tones, of the Rector's appoint- 
ment as Branch Secretary, and pledge her their loyal sup- 
liort for the work of the future. 



Kent S'chool for boys, in Connecticut, has a "Father's 
Association" which has an annual meeting toward the 
end of the school year. Last year eighty-two fathers of 
boys in the school spent the week end there, rooming with 
their sons in the school buildings. 



S't. Margaret's School, Tokyo, graduated a class of 74 
Ibis spring. Fifteen girls were confirmed by Bishop Reif- 
snider in the school Chapel shortly before the end of the 
school year. 



(The following is an extract from a letter written to 
R*^. Rev. Robert E. Campbell, Bishop of Liberia.) 

Easter I have spent in the Bassa district. From without, 
St. John's Church doesn't look like much. Yet, for the 
feast, the people had decorated it with real taste — festoons 
of tropical flowers, some ornaments and spangles such as 
we use on Christmas trees at home, and a perfect multiude 
of candles in all parts of the building. At 3:30 in the 
morning we began with Matins. Baptism of converts cams 
after the second lesson, followed by the sacrament of Con- 
flrmation, wherein twenty-five persons received the unction 
from on High. Then, in the glory of the tropical dawn, 
I offered the Holy Sacrifice for the assembled multitude, 
pleading anew the worthiness of the Paschal Victim. 

In the week following I visited the new school, founded 
by Bishop Overs, and named after him, at Fortsville, on 
the St. John's River. That is the place where the human 
leopards (men, for criminal reasons, prowling about at 
night in leopard skins) tried to stop the work; and once, 
at least, tried to take the life of Father Greenfield, our 
native priest-in-charge. But the good soldier of Christ stood 
his ground fearlessly. He has not only gathered a little 
congregation, but has collected lumber and materials for 
a new church, and a new school building; and is merely 
waiting the word from his Bishop to begin the construc- 
tion. The congregation worships now in a pretty tumble- 
down private house — not nearly so good as that which 
Christ Church was using two decades ago — yet we held a 
really surprising Mass, confirmed fifteen, and preached. 

It is interesting to note that in this same St. John's 
River, a few miles up, we passed Factory Island, a relic 
of the bitter days of the slave traffic. One can see the 
ruins of a stone bridge to the mainland, which, we heard, 
dates back to the days of the Portuguese raiders. On the 
island itself now overgrown by the rank jungle, and utterly 
uninhabited, lie several deep pits, into which the captives 
were thrown while awaiting transportation to Boston, or 
other slave markets. 



The Rt. Rev. Robert W. Andrews, of Nikko, has received 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Johns H'opkins 
yjpiversity. 



"Sto])! I>ook! Listen!" has been criticised by a psy- 
chologist whom the Outlook quotes on the ground that 
any peremptory command awakens the instinctive desire 
to do the opposite. "Keep out. This means you," seldom 
arouses in the reader the delighted surprise of the Eng- 
lishman who asked: "Now, how do you suppose they knew 
I was going to visit this town today?" but more often an 
irresistible imjuilse to trespass upon the forbidden precincts. 
This writer suggests: "Come on and hit one of our trains. 
Our engines satisfy," at railway crossings. 

Whether or not this is true, we think the most futile 
slogan ever devised is the current "Safety First." For it 
means simply nothing at all. First of all, it sets up a neg- 
ative ideal, which most of us despise, and then it gives us 
no idea of what we are to do If you should brutally mur- 
der the man who sits next to you as you drive your car 
and continually shouts: "Look out!" and nothing more, 
we are certain that any Christian jury would call it justifi- 
able homicide. For he puts your nerves on edge without 
affording you the least assistance or guidance. Should voa 
drive slowly because a policeman is ahead, or fast because 
he is behind? STiould you slow up because there is danger 
ahead, or speed up because there is a falling tree which 
you would like to leave behind? 

We think the preacher may learn something from this. 
He so often adjures us to be saved, which etymologic-ally 
and practically means "Safety flrst," without giving us an 
inkling of what we are to be saved from or for. H'e so 
often shouts: "Slop! T^ok! T^isten," without telling us 
what it is that may hit us— From Gargoyles, in The Church- 
nia;^. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



13 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE AND TRAINING INSTITU- 
TION, CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



MAY AT THE, ORPHANAGE. 

The Orphanage is happy to chronicle a number of visits 
frona old boys and girls during the past month. Among 
them are C. T. Smith, now working at the Ford Automobile 
Plant; Jesse Bruton, a vestryman ol St. Saviour's Parish, 
Raleigh; William Gates, a telegraph operator with the 
Western Union; LeRoy Byers, with the Southern Power 
& Construction Co.; Mrs. Avery Rhyne, of Charlotte; Lillie 
Nash, of Grange, N. J.; Kathleen Sherbert and Laurie Far- 
mer, graduate nurses working at present in Charlotte; Effie 
Giifiin, who graduated this May from the Presbyterian 
Hospital Training S'chool for Nurses, and Annie Deal of the 
St. Peter's Training School for Nurses. It is always a great 
pleasure to welcome home our old boys and girls and very 
gratifying to note the success they are making in life. 

It was also a great pleasure to receive a visit from Miss 
Capehart, the first matron employed at the Thompson Or- 
phanage. Miss Capehart was enthusiastic about the im- 
provement and development of the institution. 

On May 10th ground was broken for the new administra- 
tion building which is to be erected on the site of the 
farmer's cottage in the center of the semicircle of build- 
ings. This will be the largest building and will contain 
the offices, kindergarten room, library, and reading room, 
assembly hall and gymnasium, scout room, Girl Reserve 
room, sewing room and storage room. It is hoped that it 
may be completed in time for the opening of school in Sep- 
tember. This building is need five of the building program 
to which the friends of the Orphanage gave so generously 
during the building campaign of May, 1924. 

The Tri-State Conference of the Orphanage Workers 
was held this year at the Presbyterian Orphans' Home at 
Barium Springs. It was the largest in attendance and one 
of the best programs in the history of the conference. Not 
the least important feature was the study of the workings 
of the splendid institution which Mr. Johnson has developed 
at Barium. Our Orphanage tied with the Thomasville Bap- 
tist Orphanage in having the largest number of delegates 
present. The conference unanimously voted to accept the 
invitation of Rev. Thomas P. Noe, S'uperintendent of our 
Episcopal Church home at York, S. C, for the meeting of 
the Conference in 1927. 

On the eleventh of May the Rev. Mr. Jackson and the 
members of St. Martin's Woman's Auxiliary made a tour 
of inspection of the new buildings at the Orphanage and 
brought the children a treat of ice cream We wish more 
of our friends would come and see what is being done to 
develop and improve the institution. 

On the evening of May 21st, the Young People's Fellow- 
ship of St. Peter's Parish presented a series of Living Pic- 
tures of Mother Goose Rhymes, to which the children of 
the Orphanage were kindly invited. The pictures were 
beautifully and accurately portrayed and the children 
greatly enjoyed them. , 

In the early part of May the annual track meets were 
held for all ages of children. The result of a close con- 
test between the older boys' and girls' teams was a victory 
for Vertie Potts' Yale team over Harvard, captained by 
Ruth Duffy. All previous records were shattered except 
that for the standing broad jump for the girls, which was 
equalled. In the boys section of the meet, S'am Fort estab- 
lished to his credit new high marks in the pole vault, 
running broad jump, standing broad jump, and shot 
put and emerged first in the individual scoring. 
Sam was closely followed by Ben Nash who tied 
him in the 75 yard dash and for the new record 
in the running high jump. In the older Girls' meet Ethel 
Pace captured highest honors with the team captain, Ruth 
Duffy, coming second by a narrow margin. Ethel broke 



the running hop, step and jump records with a mark ot 
28 feet 1 1-2 inches and the basketball distance throw by 
hurling it 69 feet; she also tied the former record of 7 feet 
for the standing broad jump. Ruth Duffy set two new high 
marks by jumping 13 feet 1 inch in the running broad and 
4 feet and 1 inch in the running high jump. Score — Yale 
89, Harvard 69. 

In the younger boys' and gils' meet, Captain Lidia El- 
liott's Red team defeated the Blues led by Captain Lucille 
v incent by the score of 80 to 38 



SUGGESTED LISTS OF READING FOR THE SUBJECTS 
TO BE STUDIED 1926-r1927. 



FOR A STITDY OF THE. GENERAL CHURCH PROGRAM 

THE COST OF A NEW WORLD— Kenneth Maclennan— 
Missionary Education Movement. 

WHITHER BOUND IN MISSIONS'— D. J. Fleming— As- 
sociation Press. 

FOR THE RURAL PROBLEM— Collateral Reading. 

EMPTY CHURCHES— C J. Galpin, Century Co. 

THE WOMAN ON THE FARM— Mary Meek Atkeson, 
Century Co. 

THE LITTLE TOWN— Harlan Paul Douglass— MacMil- 
lan. 

SO BIG- Edna Ferber. 

WILD GEESE— Martha Ostenso. 

ADVENTURES' IN FRIENDSHIP— David Grayson. 

MAIN STREET— Sinclair Lewis. 

FOR PEACE. 

CHRISTIANITY AND THE RACE PROBLEM— J. H. 
Oldham. 

WAYS TO PEACE— Compiled by the American Peace 
Av.'ard. 

RURAL PROBLEM— Text Book. 

BEYOND THE CITY LIMITS, by Rev. F. D. Goodwin, 
with Suggestions for Leaders by Miss Boyer. 



BISHOP DARST'S APPOINTMENTS FOR JUNE AND 
JULY. 



June 1 — Meeting of Board of Trustees, St. Mary's S'chool, 
Raleigh. 

(> — Church of the Advent, Williamston; St. Martin's 
Church, Hamilton. 

8-9 — Inter-Diocesan Conference on Evangelism, S't. Mary's 
School, Raleigh. 

10-11 — MeetlNg of National Commission on Elvangelism, 
Washington, D. C. 

13 — Christ Church, New Bern, A. M. and P. M.; Grace 
Church, Trenton, afternoon. 

14-15 — Young People's Service league Conference, 
Washington, N. C. 

15. St. Peter's Church, Washington, P. M. 

20 — Trinity Church, Lumberton, A. M.; St. Stephen's, 
Red S'prings, afternoon; Christ Church, Hope Mills P. M. 

21-22 — Convocation of Colored Church Workers, S't. 
Joseph's, Fayetteville. 

June 27 — St. Mary's Church, Kinston, A. M. 

July 4-10 — Gambler Summer School, Gambler, Ohio. 

18 — ^Holy Innocents' Church, Seven S'prings. 

25 — Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York. 

Other appointments between July 10 and 25 to be an- 
nounced later. 



"What shall I call you?" a doctor in the Peter Bent 
Rrigham Hospital, Boston, asked the City Mission Chap- 
lain. The Chaplain answered: "I am Brother to all the 
Negroes: Father to all the Irish; Chaplain to all the men 
who went across. Doctor to all ujjstate Methodists and 
Baptists; and Mooster to all the Hebrews." — Church Mili- 
tant. Mass. 



14 



THE MISSION HEKALD. 



Young People's Department. 



M]SL' WILLIAM MELICK, EDITOR OF DEPARTMENT. 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S SERVICE LEAGUE CONVENTION. 



GREAT PROGRAM AND ATTENDANCE. 



(By Theodore Partiick, Jr.) 

The third annual convention of the Young People's Ser- 
vice League of East Carolina, which met at St. Peter's 
Church, Wasliing'ion, (the original Washington), on June 
I'lth and 15th, must be written down as one of the most 
interesting and significant gatherings in the whole life of 
the uiocese. There were present all the elements of a most 
successful convention, — a large attendance, a program of 
inspiring addresses, and a right admixture of fun and rever- 
ent worship. A good time was had by all, not even except- 
ing Frank Dean, Stephen Gardner, Mrs. Jarl Bowers and 
tlie others who worked so hard to make the occasion a 
success. 

Symptomatic of the times, practically all of the delegates 
arrived by motor on Monday afternoon the 14th. The 
first thing on the program was a banquet in honor of Bishop 
Darst, minus Mrs. Darst, given in the dining room of the 
Metnouist Church that evening. The banquet was a most 
enjoyable affair, though it was a matter of general regret 
that Mrs. Darst was unable to accompany the Bishop. 
Edmund Harding led the banqueters in singing. 

Following the banquet, the delegates and visitors went 
upstairs into the auditorium of the church, where the open- 
ing session of the convention was held. The President, Mr. 
Aubrey Parsley, presided. An address of welcome was given 
by Miss Charlotte Grimes, of Washington. The response 
was made by the President of the Fayettevilie Y. P. S'. L. 
An address of greeting was given the young people by 
Bishop Darst. It was in a very happy vein, though under- 
neath there was a challenge to the young people that was 
compelling. He told the young people that he had been 
called upon to lead a national movement on Evangelism 
that would involve his leaving the diocese for a long period, 
and asked them to share in this undertaking by holding up 
his hands. 

The Rev. Charles McAllister, a representative of the 
National Council, brought greetings from the Presiding 
Bishop to the young people. He made friends with his 
audience at once by speaking in high terms of th^ir own 
Bishop Darst, then assured his youthful hearers that in the 
heart of Bishop Murray there was a great love for them and 
a great cause of dependence upon them. 

A happy interlude occurred here, when the Rev. Frank 
Dean, who is chairman of the commission on Young Peoples 
Work in the Diocese, secured recognition and presented 
Bishop Darst with a handsome loving cup a sa present from 
the young people. Dr. Dean was himself rewarded with 
a handsome gift, a white stole, from the young people. 

The Rt. Rev. E. A. Penick, Bishop Co-adjutor of North 
Carolina, conducted a preparation for the Holy Communion 
that was to follow next morning. It was a deeply spiritual 
and moving address, calling for high faith and loyalty oji 
the part of his hearers. 

TUESDAY'S PROGRAM. 

The Corporate Communion in St. Peter's Church on Tues- 
day morning was the high moment of the convention. As 
the great company of young people crowded to the altar - 
rail to rceeive Communion and pledge their loyalty to the 
Christ it created a vivid impression of the hopefulness of 
the future. Bishop Darst was the celebrant, assisted by 
Bishop Penick and the Rev Stephen Gardner. 



The first and only business meeting of the convention 
was held on Tuesday morning from 9:o0 until lunch time. 
President Parsley presided with ease and distinction. Be- 
fore the business proper was transacted, addresses were 
made by Bisnop i-eniciv and Mr. McAllister. Bishop Penick 
stressed the need of boLh personal holiness and social use- 
fulness. He said that the Alonks of the Middle Ages stress- 
ed the former to the neglect of the latter, and that in our 
present time we were in danger of forgetting the prime 
necessity of the former. Mr. McAllister told the young 
people of the work that the Church is doing among all 
classes of people in America and in the foreign field, and 
called on tnem to inform themselves as to the tremendous 
need and our own power to meet.it. 

The first item of business transacted was the adoption of 
a constitution that was suggested by the national commis- 
sion on Young People's work. This was adopted. without 
opposition. Then followed the annual election of officers. 
Mr. Parsley was re-elected President. Miss Isabel Handy, 
01 Washington, was elected vice-president; Miss William 
Melick, of Elizabeth City, secretary; and Mr. Edward 
i^egallis, of New Bern, treasurer. 

Mention was made in the meeting by Dr. Dean and others 
that a summer camp for the young people of the Diocese, 
located somewhere in East Carolina, was contemplated for 
next year. Mr. William Butt, of Bonnerton, has oiLered a 
most beautiful site on the banks of the Pamlico river. He 
was present at the convention, and made this generous cher 
in person. 

Early in the afternoon the convention visitors drove 
down to Bath, where a service was held in St. Thomas'. 
At this service the Bishop isntalled the newly elected offi- 
cers, with impressive words. The vicar, the Rev. Mr. 
Byiium, made a brief address in which he outlined the plans 
for the preservation and restoration of the old church. 

THE. PUN AT RIVERSIDE, 

After the worship and business of the morning and early 
afternoon, everybody, guest and hostess, went to Riverside 
Park, near Washington, where swimming and other recrea- 
tion was enjoyed. After a bountiful supper given by the 
hostesses, the young people (by this time everyone felt 
young) gathered in the pavillion, where games, singing and 
stunts were held. The competition for the handsome loving 
cups given to the leagues presenting the best song and stunt 
was very keen, and brought much entertainment. The 
Seven Springs League won the cup for the best song, "while 
the one from St. Paul's Edenton, won the decision for the 
best stunt. St. Paul's, Wilmington, won the cup for the 
best attendance. 

To the Rev. Frank Dean and his commission and to the 
whole congregation of St. Peter's, Washington, a vote of 
thanks is due for having provided this great opportunity for 
spiritual stimulation and enjoyment. 



A NOTE FROM MRS. CRANMER. 



The delegates to the Triennial in New Orleans, in Octo- 
ber, came away in full accord with The Message as out- 
lined at that meeting, and ready to do their part in sharing 
in its challenge and in passing it on to every woman in the 
Church. 

The time has come for action and plans have been out- 
lined that will soon be sent to every branch of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary in this diocese and to every Parochial 
Society. 

The desire for deepening a sense of individual responsi- 
bility and consecration is so great a factor in these plans 
that it is hoped that every Parish will begin this work 
with a Corporate Communion for the Women and a special 
talk on The Message by the Rector. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



15 



Convocation of Colored Church Workers 



-IN- 



The Diocese of East Carolina. 



THE REV. J. W. HERRITAGE, D.D. 
THE REV. J. B. BROWN, Secretary. 
THE REV. R. I. JOHNSON, Editor. 

ST. AUGUSTINE'S CONFERENCE. 



One of the most helpful agencies operatlu-v among CrI 
ored Churchmen in the Province of Sewanee is the Confer- 
ence at St. Augustine's School each y.iir immediately 
after Commencement for the training of le.iders in Mis- 
sions, Religious Education, and Christian Social S'ervice. 
This year there were about 70 delegates from as far north 
as New Jersey and as far south as Mississipni and Georgia 
and as far West as Illinois. The Conference opened on 
Monday evening, May 31st, and continued through Friday, 
June 4th. Our venerable and much beloveJ S'ufna.ga.n 
Bishop, Dr. Delaney, was present and shed his kindly and 
gracious influence over all. The Rev. Mr. Gould, Principal 
of the School, extended to us a cordial welcome and those 
members of the Faculty and Student body who remained 
for the Conference left no stone unturned in makim; it a 
pleasant and thoroughly enjoyable affair. 

The lecturers or Conference leaders were Prof. F. W. 
Johnson on "Adolescent Youth"; Dr. L. G. Wood on The 
Church's Program"; The Rev. G. M. Plaskett on "The 
Church and the Younger Generation"; Miss Tillotson on 
"Normal Discussion Methods"; Mrs. Challen on "Women's 
Work". Special speakers for the night meetings were Mrs, 
Challen, Miss Parker of the I^abrador, Miss Dickerman and 
Biship Delaney. The Rev. Mr. Cochran presided as usual 
over the music of the Conference one feature of which 
was the presentation to the delegates of his Communion 
strvice in F. based on the Negro Spirituals, which was 
greatly enjoyed. Further entertainment was provided for 
us at the Tuttle Home by Miss Richards and at the Library 
service in F. based on the Negro Spirituals, which was 
are not informed as we had to leave for a funeral on 
Thursday. 

Each afternoon there was a "Round Table" over which 
we had the honor of presiding, a kind of rough and tumble 
sort of an affair debating a wide range of interesting sub- 
jects very beneficial to all. 

The devotional life of the Conference was amply provid- 
ed for with Holy Communion each morning at 7 followed 
by group prayers under trees upon the campus with other 
prayers before and after meals and daily assembly at 8:45 
A. M. 

As Chaplain of the Conference Archdeacon Baskerville 
was at his post and in his happy and efficient way kept 
things interesting and moving as a sort of assistant to 
Prof. Johnson, Vice-Director of the Conference. Among 
the delegates were many outstanding men of the Colored 
Field such as Battle of Mississippi, Brown of Savannah, 
Brooks of Birmingham, Marshall of Georgia, Perry and 
Brown of Georgia and South Carolina, Elliott of Upper 
S'outh Carolina, Harper and Blaskett of New Jersey, Bas- 
kerville of South Carolina, Hicks of Mississippi. East Caro- 
lina was represented by Dean Herritage, Rev. and Mrs. 
Holder, Mrs. Anlce Williams, Mrs. Geyer and R. I. Johnson. 

To one who had not visited St.. Augustines since 1922 
the school presented many improvements. The Hunter 
Building is a thing of beauty and efficiency; the Tuttle 
Home needs but to be seen in order to create in one the 
longing that many women of the Race may see the vision 
of the kind of service for which It stands and give them- 
selves to It. There Miss Richards Is maintaining a home- 
like atmosphere In most beautiful surroundings fit to in- 



spire anyone for great service. 

The Lyman Building by a few appropriate changes is 
transformed and greatly enhanced in comfort and conven- 
ience. Mr. Gould is to be congratulated on the marks of 
progress which characterize his administration. And to 
crown all, St. Augustines is now a full fledged College the 
first of its kind for our people; and now in addition there 
is talk of bringing Bishop Payne Divinity School from 
Petersburg to the Campus of St. Augustines. There is 
much difference of opinion among the Alumni regarding 
the advisability of this however. 

Reverting to the Conference we would say that Prof. 
Johnson and the Rev. Mr. Plaskett, both Colored, showed 
themselves to be good material for the development ot 
Conference leaders. Their work was brilliant and created 
much enthusiasm and responsiveness on the part of dele- 
gates. One came away from their classes with the con- 
viction that the problem of youth is serious but that condi- 
tions are not irremediable under God and the symijathetic. 
understanding cooperation of adults at home and in the 
school and Church. 

It is difficult to find words with which to relate the power 
and vividness with which Dr. Wood sets before one the 
claims of the Church's Program. He is one of the Church's 
great forces and one leaves him with a sense of renewed 
determination to see it more plainly and do it better. 

One of the best discussions in Miss Tilletson's class was 
the Rural Problem One was stirred with a great desire 
to make a contribution to the work of putting this Church 
where she belongs in this basic field, of devising a simple 
method of approach to the great rural people and gathering 
them in simplicity and love for the Church. This problem 
among Colored people particularly is acute for the other 
religious bodies are everywhere in the woods and the con- 
tinuous stream of people to the city finds its way always 
into them and not to us. 

Every Church in East Carolina should be represented 
at this Conference next year by .its Minister and at least 
one layman. Your fare is paid one way and entertainment 
is free through the help extended Bishop Delaney by 
Dr. Patten of the American Church Institute for Negroes. 
Your greatest problems are there discussed by people who 
know what has been and can be done. You cannot afford 
to stay away. 



CHILDREN BREAK THEIR OWN RECORD. 



Nearly $75,000 as the total amount of the Church school 
Easter offering this year in the Diocese of Pennsylvania. 
This was nearly $6,000 more than any previous offering 
from the Church children in that diocese, and Pennsylvania 
has always been at the head of the list in the amount 
given. 

This great annual Church school Lenten offering was in- 
vented and started in Pennsylvania forty-nine years ago, 
by Mr. John Marston, of St John's, Lower Merion, now 
Cynwyd, and the first offering amounted to $200.00. For 
the last triennium, 1923-25, the total offering from all the 
children of the Church, as far as reported to the national 
treasurer's office, was $1,300,000. Final figures for 1926 
are not yet available. 

In Philadelphia, some special observEvnce is to mark the 
fiftieth anniversary of the Lenten offering next year. The 
Pennsylvania Diocesan Convention passed a resolution 
thereon, and it is hoped the celebration may be held 
throughout the Church. 

FOR SALE. 



A SET OF ANTE NICENE LIBRARY, published by T. & 
T. Clarke, Edinburgh, 1872- 24 vols., cloth. $45.00. 

Address, REV. F. N. SKINNER, 

Martin's Point. S. C. 



16 



THE MISSION HERATJ). 



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A 







CONTENTS 

Mr. Partrick Resigns Editorship. 
Mr. Cameron appointed his suc- 
cessor. 
339th Birthday of Virginia Dare. 
Mr. Partrick's Parting Word. 

Dedication of Saint Peter's Parish 

House. 
Concerning Bishop Darst's Absence 
News of The Clergy. 
Bishops Thompson, Penick, and 

Finley offer services to East 

CaroHna. 





September, 1926 



Published by the Diocese of East Carolina at Ayden, N. C. 



o 



V 



o 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



A JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Rev. WARREN W. WAY, Rector. 



o 



An Episcopal School for Girls. Four years High School and two 
years College Courses. Accredited. Special courses: Music, Art, 
Expression, Home Economics, Business. 

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Advent session opened Sept 15, 1925. For cat-ilogue address 
A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager, Raleigh N. C. 




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GOD WANTS YOU. 



(By THE REV. GEO. W. LAY, D.C.L ) 

Everyone has a strong sense of the importance to himself of his own indi- 
viduality. He is more important to himself that is anyone else. I may ap- 
preciate the kindness rendered to me because I am an American, or a South- 
erner, or a alumnae of a certain college, but I value kindness and liking far 
more, if it is occasioned by what I am myself. 

It is wonderful that God wills all the world should be saved. It is more 
wonderful and satisfying to realize His love for the individual. Each has his 
own Christian name Each has a name written in Heaven. He loves YOU 
and wishes YOU to love Him. This should be our first thought. 

God Wants Your Work. 

"We are labourers together with God." That is a great honor, a great com- 
fort and a great responsibility. We can be sure of his help. Certain duties 
He has assigned us. He will not perform our part. If you fail H'im, you mar 
or delay His infinite plan. But mere activity will not suffice, if you have not 
eagerly answered His loving invitation, "My son, give »ie thine heart." 

God Wants Your Money. 

Money is the symbol of our love By it we can measure the extent of our 
thankfulness for sins forgiven and our gratitude for blessings conferred 
Money is the means by which we extend the range of our activities and in- 
crease the opportunities available for service. By it we assist those who 
have powers that we lack and enter into every activity to ensure that His will 
may be done and His Kingdom come. Money is not a low thing that ought 
to be despised. It has its function in the Church as in all civilized work. 
Its true value however is measured by the motive behind its expenditure and 
the end for which it is used. 



A five-dollar gold piece was recently presented to a South Dakota mission 
by an Indian woman in thanksgiving for her grand-daughter's confirmation. 

Miss M. Amelia Parkes retires in S'eptember from her position as organist 
of St. Stephen's Church, Millburn, N. J., in the middle of her nfty-fourth year 
of continuous service in that capacity. 



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The Mission Herald. 



Vol. XL. 



AYDEN, N. C, SEPTEMBER, 1926. 



No. 9. 



Mr. Partrick Resigns Rectorate of Grace Church, 

Plymouth 

AND EDITORSHIP OF THE MISSION HERALD 



(By THE REV. G. F. CAMERON.) 




It was with a deep sense of regret we learned that our 
brother and friend, the Rev. Theodore Partrick, Jr , had 
resigned his work in the Diocese of East Carolina to ac- 
cept call of Trinity Church, Scotland Neck, and Church 
of the Advent, Enfield, in the Diocese of North Carolina, 
and to edit the Carolina Churchman, the official organ of 
that Diocese. He began his new work the first of Septem- 
ber, and will live in S'cotland Neck. 

Mr. Partrick was born in . Clinton, N. C, June 2nd, 



1889. He attended the public schools of 
Clinton, the University of North Carolina, 
and finished at the Theological Seminary in 
Virginia with the Class of 1920; was in news- 
paper work from 1911 to 1916; ordained 
Deacon in June, 1918, and Priest in June, 
1920; served the churches in Southport and 
Lumberton for several months, and became 
Rector of Grace Church, Plymouth, and St. 
Luke's, Roper, in January, 1921 ; editor of 
the Mission Herald from September, 1920, to 
September, 1926; member of the Standing 
Committee, the Executive Council, delegate 
to the Provincial Synod, and Deputy to the 
General Convention. In addition to his many 
duties he was also Captain of the 120th In- 
fantry of the .30th Division of the National 
Guard. 

Under Mr. Partrick's wise and efficient 
management the Mission Herald has pros- 
pered and grown in influence during the past 
five years. Its financial condition is very 
good, and its circulation is dependable. Its 
editorials were aways thoughtful, sane and 
constructive, and portrayed their author as a 
prophet of vision and courage. We looked 
forward to each issue with eagerness. 

His genuine sympathetic nature, deep con- 
secration, affability, and honesty of purpose 
endeared him to all, clergy and laity alike. 
Elsewhere we are printing a testimony given 
in behalf of his people in Plymouth whe»fe 
he was most highly esteemed and loved by all 
the townspeople, regardless of their denominational 
affiliation, and no outward witness could be more 
indicative of an inward grace. There was no honor 
possessed by the Diocese of East Carolina that was 
not bestowed upon him. and our love and prayer- 
ful interest shall continue to follow him, always 
wishing for him and his charming family the 
greatest happiness and prosperity in the Master's 
Kingdom. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Diocese of East Carolina. 



STATEMENT OF AMOUNTS PAID ON APPORTION- 
MENTS FOR THE CHURCH'S PROGRAM, DIOCESAN 
AND GENERAL TO AUGUST 31ST, 1926. 



Location and Parish. Apportion- 

ment. 
FIRST. 

Burgaw, St. Mary's $ 100.00 

Edenton, St. Pauls 3000.00 

Wilmington, S't. James' 11040.00 

Woodville, Grace Church 500.00 

Winterville, S't. Luke's 200.00 

SECOND. 

Creswell, St. David's $ 700.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 2415.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 4300.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 1500.00 

Greenville, St. Paul's 2100.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 1170.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 2500.00 

New Bern, Chirst Church 4000.00 

Plymouth, Grace Church 1000.00 

Washington, St. Peted's 4500.00 

Wilmington, St. John's 3000.00 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 1995.00 

Windsor, St. Thomas'.. 800.00 

THIRD. 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' $ 100.00 i 

Ayden, St. James' 320 . 00 

Btaufort, St. Paul's 600.00 

Belhaven, St. James' 500.00 

Bonnerton, St. John's 100.00 

Clinton, St. Paul's 400.00 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 300.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 530.00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 250.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 200.00 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's. 70.00 

Roper, S't. Luke's 350.00 

Southport, St. Philip's 250.00 

Williamston, Church of Advent 500.00 

Winton, St. John's 200 . 00 

Roxobel, St. Mark s . 125.00 

S'now Hill, St. Barnabas' 200.00 

Swan Quarter, Calvary...... 60.00 

Warsaw, Calvary 80.00 

Whiteville, Grace Church... 90.00 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 100.00 

FOURTH. 

Atkinson, St. Thomas ..$100.00 ^ 

Aurora, Holy Cross 500.00 

Bath, St. Thomas' 100 . 00 

Chocowinity, Trinity 100.00' 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 200.00 

Griffon, S't. John's 250.00 

Hope Mills, Christ Church.. 150.00 

Jessama, Zion 275 . 00 

Lake Landing, St. George's.. 250.00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 400.00 

Red Spring's, St. Stephen's.. 100.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 240.00 

Vanceboro, S't. Paul's.... 100.00 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd.. 300.00 

Wilmington, St. Mark's 400.00 

Belhaven, St. Mary'si 150 . 00 

Bunyan, St. S'tephen's 25.00 

Edenton, St. John's 150.00 

Edward, Redeemer 25.00 

Elizabeth City. St. Philip's.. 50.00 



Paid by 


Paid by 


Parish 


Ch. School 


. 40.32 


$....... 


1920.25 


100.00 


5819.03 


880.02 




61.00 


120.00 


26.00 


$ 195.00 


$125.00 


950.00 


350.00 


1329.00 




538.40 


61.64 


700.00 


200.00 


300.00 


133.09 


38.19 


50.00 


850.00 


454.29 


100.00 


75.00 


1875.00 


411.86 


1256 . 58 


182.55 


637.10 


179.27 


112.50 


76.70 


55.00 


$ 11.49 


50.00 




309.19 


78.01 


261.21 


100.00 


36.96 




162.05 


55.19 


100.00 


50.00 


115.28 


76.72 


31.33 


18.70 




40.00 


60.15 


7.21 


152.10 


45.00 


125.00 


100.00 




35.00 


85.00 


15.00 


70.00 


17.55 


66.00 




30.00 


2.15 



5.00 



100 


.00 


26 


.25 


52 


.86 


55 


00 


28 


41 


37 


04 


265 


00 


121 


00 


119 


63 


201 


86 


8 


27 


3 


52 


50 


00 



Location and Parish. Apportion- 

ment. 

Fairfield, All Saints' 35 . 00 

Faison, St. Gabriel's.. 50.00 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 50.00 

Lumberton, Trinity 100.00 

Maxton, St. Matthew's 50.00 

North West, All Souls' 50.00 

Sladesville, S't. John s 30.00 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 100.00 

Trenton, Grace Church 125.00 

Washington, St. Paul's 250.00 

Wrightsville, S't Andrew's.. 100.00 

Aurora, St. Jude's.. 100.00 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 40.00 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 100.00 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 125.00 

Jasper, S't. Thomas' 50.00 

Kinston, Christ Church 75.00 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas'.. 50.00 

Oriental, St. Thomas' 25.00 

Pikeville, Mission 50.00 

Pollocksville, Mission 48.00 

Robersonville, Mission 25.00 

Roper, St. Ann's 60 .00 

Haddock's X Roads, 

St. S'tephen's 130.00 

Williamston, St. Ignatius' 30.00 

Wilmington"Brooklyn" Miss. 15.00 
Vy'rii^htsville "McCumbers"MiPS. 20.00 
Farmville, Mission 15.00 



Paid by Paid by 
Parish Ch. School 

15.00 

25.00 

20.00 10.00 

50.00 

25.00 

1.00 
18.00 5.00 
42.00 

6.91 9.46 

45.88 54.77 

9.00 6.00 

15.00 10.25 

12.50 ... 

15.00 3.00 

26.00 

31.25 30.00 

26.00 

50.00 

10.00 5.56 

12.97 

8.32 

5.00 

5.00 



$55,908.00 



5.20 



GOOD MANNERS AND RELIGION. 

The religion of Christianity is founded on the Law ot 
Love. If we love God and man, we have fulfilled every 
law. The practical rule and the test of every action is 
The Royal Law, "Do unto others as you would they should 
do unto you." There are many conventional rules of good 
breeding, some of which may seem over-particular. Each 
one however will prove to be founded on the idea of acting 
so as to be agreeable to others. And the outward acts of 
courtesy are valued in proportion to the kindly feeling 
that prompted them. We greet each other, make calls, 
write notes, accept invitations, even though inconvenient, 
and acknowledge favors as a part of ordinary good man- 
■,25.' 00 ners. 

35 00 ^° ^® treat God with the common courtesy expected of 

us towards our fellow men? Would we stop greeting our 
loved ones, or neglect to call on our friends, or ignore their 

invitations for idle excuses, because we felt lazy, or because 

55.00 it was vacation? Would we cease to congratulate, to ex- 
4.75 press good wishes, to return thanks, or to show honor to 
14.03 merit and high position for any of the trivial reasons that 
20.00 are given for neglect of God? 

27.14 The due observance of The Lords Day, prayer in private 

20.00 or in public, and all acts of worship are simply good man- 
23.40 ners in the highest relations, being polite to God. Rever- 

ence in Church corresponds to the propriety demanded by 

50. Oo good breeding in the house of another man. 

12.40 These considerations deserve our careful thought at all 

times, but especially in the Summer Season, when the 

7.24 sense of duty is dulled, the temptation to fritter away our 
283.00 time is strong and we are surrounded by those who think 
10.00 little, or not at all, of the highest things. 

Courtesy in its highest form demands that we should 

...... greet God at stated times, thank Him for His favors, visit 

18.75 Him at His House, reverently come to His table, praise 
...... Him for His power, wisdom and love and labor for His 

7.00 honor and glory. — The Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



THE BISHOP'S LETTER 



The new editor of the Mission Herald, Rev. George F. 
Cameron, has requested me to write a Bishop's Letter 
for the September issue, and while 1 have very little to 
report as to my diocesan activities since the last issue, I 
am gladly complying with his request. 

First of all, I must express the universal regret of the 
Diocese over the departure of our former editor. Rev. 
Theodore Partrick, who after a fine, useful ministry in 
East Carolina has accepted a call to the attractive parish of 
Scotland Neck in the neighboring Diocese of North Carolina. 

Mr. Partrick's work in East Carolina was of an unus- 
ually high order and his ministry has been most effective, 
especially in Plymouth and Roper where his entire min- 
istry in East Carolina, with the exception of one year in 
Robeson county, was spent. The Biocese, recognizing his 
splendid qualities, honored him with many jiositions of im- 
portance, including membership on the Standing Committee 
and on the Executive Council, and by electing him as a 
deputy to General Convention 

We know that he will be happy and useful in his new 
parish, but we do not believe he can possibly have any 
fuller measure of trust and confidence than he so justly 
won and held in his home diocese of Eist Carolina. 

It is not necessary for me to speak of his fine service 
as editor of the Mission Herald, for we all aiipreciate 
his splendid contribution along that line, and of the high 
place he made for our Diocesan paper, not only at home 
but in many places beyond our borders. 

Now let us add a word as to the new editor: 

Like Mr. Partrick, he is one of our own East Carolina 
boys. Born in Hope Mills some thirty-two ye^rs ago, he 
became a Postulant for the sacred ministry shortly after 
I came to the Diocese. With fine determination he won 
his way through the University of Virginia and the Vir- 
ginia Theological Seminary, receiving the degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts at the former institution and the degree of 
Bachelor in Divinity at the latter. 

Since June, 1924, he has been in charge of S't. .lames', 
Ayden; St. John's, Pitt County; St. Mark's, Griffon, and 
Holy Innocents', Lenoir county. 

In all of these places he has made full proof of his min- 
istry and has gotten results of which any minister mi.ght 
be humbly and gratefully proud 

He brings to his new position a clear, logical mind, un- 
limited enthusiasm, and a happy faculty of expression 

We believe he will maintain and carry forward the high' 
standard set by his predecessors, and we ask for him the 
sympathetic and loyal support of the people of the Diocese. 

While I was very busy with Diocesan apiiointments during 
the month of June, my time since then has been given in 
large measure to the work of the National Commission on 
Evangelism. 

On Siinday, July the fourth, I preached the Conference 
sermons at the Gambler S'ummer School, in the Chapel 
of Kenyon College. Gambler, Ohio. 

From Monday, the fifth through Frid?iy, the ninth, I 
conducted Conferences on Evangelism at the Gambier Sum- 
mer School. 

On Wednesday, July the fourteenth, I preached and con- 
firmed ten persons presented by the Rector in St. Mark's 
Church, Wilmington, at 8 P. M. 

On Friday, the sixteenth, I confirmed two i)evsons in St. 
James' Church, Wilmington. 

On Sunday, the eighteenth. I preached, confirmed four 
persons, presented by the Rector Rev. George F. Cameron, 
and celebrated Holy Communion in Holy Innocents' Church, 
Lexioi.r County. After .a bountiful dinner oii the church 



grounds we had another service at which the Rev. W. R. 
Noe preached. 

On Monday, the nineteenth, Mr. Noe and I visited Farm- 
ville, Greenville and Williamston, arriving in Washington 
in the late afternoon. 

On Tuesday, the twentieth, I had the privilege of layi^r 
the corner stone of the new Parish House of S't Peter's, 
Washington. 

The principal address at this service was made by Mr. 
Samuel S. Nash, of Tarboro. 

On Sunday, the twenty-fifth, I preached in the Cathedral 
of St. John the Divine, New York, at 11 A. M. and 4 P. M. 

On Monday, the twenty-sixth, T had a Conference with a 
Special Committee of the Bishops' Crusade in Norfolk, 
Conn. 

On Sunday, August first, I i)reached in the Cathedral of 
St. John the Divine, New York, at 11 A. M. and 4 P. M. 

The next few days were S])ent with Mr. Lewis B. Frank- 
lin, Treasurer of the National Council, at his summer home 
in Noroton, Conn. 

On Thursday, the fifth, I addressed a group of laymen 
on the subject of Evangelism at a luncheon in New York. 

On Sunday, the eighth, I preached in the Cathedral of 
St. John, the Divine, New York, at 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

It is interesting to note that my Sunday morning congre- 
.gaticns at the Cathedral numbered about eighteen hun- 
dred persons at each service, with never less than a thou- 
sand persons in the afternoon service. 

From Monday evening, August ninth, to Friday, the 
twelfth, I presided at a meeting of the National Commis- 
sion on Evangelism in the summer home of Mr. and Mrs. 
S-imuel Thorne at Keene Valley, N. Y. 

On August the eighteenth, 1 attended and took part in the 
Virginia Dare Celebration at Fort Raleigh on Roanoke 
Island. 

This was a very wonderful occasion and I presume that 
an account of same will be i)rinted in this issue of the 
Mission Herald. 

On Sunday night, August the twenty-second, I conducted 
.services and preached in the Union Chapel at Wrightsville 
Beach. 

On Wednesday, the irst of September. I dedicated a 
beautiful bell recently presented to S't. Andrew's Church, 
Wrightsville Sound. 

From Tuesday, the sexenth, to Thursday, the ninth, I at- 
tended the School of Methods of the Field Department of 
the National Council in Asbury Park, N. J. 

On Wednesday, the eighth, I presented the plans of the 
National Commission on Evangelism, and on Thursday I 
made the closing address. 

You will see from the above that my summer has been 
a very busy one, for in addition to the engagements men- 
tioned above I have carried on a voluminous correspondence 
in connection with the Bishojjs' Crusade. 

On September, the fifteenth, we will open our headquar- 
ters in Washington, D. C, and enter upon a strenuous 
campaign in the interest of the Bishops' Crusade. It is 
with keen regret that I leave the diocese for a period of 
six months but the work to which I have been called seems 
so imnortant that I can not do otherwise than give my 
whole time to it for the next few months. 

It heartens and encourages me to know that my action 
has the approval of the Standing Committee, the Clergy 
and the people of the Diocese, and I know that I will have 
yo>ir constant prayers that God may bless my labors in 
this .great undertaking for Christ and His Church. 

Before closing this letter I must express my sincere re- 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



gret over the departure of another of onr fine young Clergy, 
the Rev. John W. Heyes, who has resigned his work at 
Parmville and Snow Hill to accept a call to Eufala, Ala- 
bama. Mr. Heyes has rendered splendid service in all of 
the points served by him and our prayers and good wishes 
will follow him as he enters upon his new duties. 

Bishops Finley, Thomson and Penick have kindly con- 
sented to visit the Diocese for the purpose of administering 
Confirmation this fall, and I earnestly trust that they will 
find classes waiting for them in many of our Parishes and 
Missions. 

All matter relating to Diosesan busiTiess will be handled 
by the Rev. W. R. Noe, who will keep in close touch with 
me. 

Praying that the Holy Spirit may guide and direct us all 
as we go forward in Christ's Name to accomplish His pur- 
poses. I am your affectionate friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



much gratified to have with them Mrs. James G. Staton, the 
United Thank Offering Treasurer o.f our Diocese. 

This Alaskan meeting is to be an annual thing in our 
Auxiliary. 



THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY OF ST. PETER'S CHURCH, 
WASHINGTON. 



(By Mrs. GUY C. SMALL, Secretary.) 
The Woman's Auxiliary of S't. Peter's Parish, Washing- 
ton, assembled for a mid-summer meeting on Monday after- 
noon, August 16th, in order to pack a box of toys to so to 
Alaska for the little children of Anvik and Nenana; also 
incidentally to have a program meeting on Alaska that the 
members might know more intimately about that region. 

It was an intensely hot afternoon, yet the members to the 
number of about forty came to the home of the beloved 
president, Mrs. M. H'. Bonner, on West Second St She 
and Miss Rachel Rumley were the hostesses for the after- 
noon. Two huge tables packed with toys looked most in- 
teresting, just as if Santa Claus had started on his rounds 
somewhat earlier than usual this year. The fact is that the 
last boat for Alaska leaves Seattle the first of September, 
and after that Santa must go all the way by dog sled only, 
to those lonely mission posts in the Far North. 

After the opening prayers, the program began with an .in- 
formal talk on Bishop Rowe by Mrs. Guy C. Small. She 
also told some interesting facts about the country there. 
This was followed by a reading by Mrs. J D. Grimes con- 
cerning St. Mark's Station, Nenana- — one of the places 
where our toys are to go. A letter in this connection was 
read from Miss Bessie Blacknall, one of our teachers there, 
whose old home is in Henderson. N. C. She has lust re- 
turned to Alaska after nine months' furlough. 

The next item on the program was an article read from 
"The Alaskan Churchman." a periodical which is published 
four times a year at Cordova. This piece was entitled 
"Christmas Dav at the Church's Mission Farthest North" 
(Point Hope) read bv Mrs. C. B. Bell. D'uring the meeting 
a map of Alaska, and pictures were passed around to fl;lve 
color to the readings. The next tonic was on Anvik, whore 
Miss Susan B Smith is one of the teachers, and a tvnical 
Auxiliary meeting was described, showing that in spite of 
the cold and various hardships it is an alive and active 
organization. Mrs. W. B. Harding had charge of this part 
of the program. Anvik is the second place that we are 
planning to send our toys, and if we have an over-suffi- 
ciency a third box will go to Ea.gle, Rev. Wood Gaither'a 
former mission. 

A short business pession followed in which the Auxiliary 
voted to subscribe to the "Alaskan Churchman." and sewing 
work for Thomnson Ornhanase was discussed. The pro- 
gram ended with a solepdidlv rendered poem, entitled, 
"The Law ©f the Yukon." by Robert Service, and read by 
Mrs W. H. Shelburne. We think this poem a finer inter- 
pretation of Alaska than the "T^ure of the Yukon." which 
was read last year. 

A social period followed during which the hostesses serv- 
ed delicious p&ach ice and cake. The Auxiliary was very 



EAST CAROLINA UNITED THANK OFFERING 
RECEIVED TO JULY 12, 1926. 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON. 

Aurora $ 20 

Avoca 10 

Ayden 12 

Belhaven 35 

Creswell 20 

Columbia 5 

Chocowinity 

Edenton 134 

Elizabeth City 55 

Farmville 5 

Gatesville 7 

Greenville . . 29 

Griffon 2 

Hamilton 5 

Middleton (Lake Landing) 7 

Hertford 52 

Plymouth 9 

Roper , 10 

Roxobel 11 

Sunbury 2 

S'wan Quarter 8 

Washington 118 . 

Williamston 43 . 

Winterville 10 . 

Windsoii 34 . 

Woodville SO . 

Yeates ville 6 . 

Zion, Washington, R F. D 6 . 

CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON. 

Beaufort $ 14 . 

Clinton 20 . 

Campbellton 10 . 

Faison 3 . 

Fayetteville 12B . 

Goldsboro 69 . 

New Bern 62 . 

Pollocksville 1 . 

Seven Sprin.gs 3 . 

Snow Hill 7 . 

Whiteville — P. O. Vineland _ 4 . 

Wallace 5 . 

Wilmington: 

Ascension 2 . 

Good STiepherd 12 . 

St. .Tames 485 • 

:St. John's 130 . 

St. Paul's 39 . 



.03 
.03 
.37 
.00 
.06 
.00 
.92 
.00 
.68 
.00 
.30 
.05 
.63 
.00 
.30 
.08 
.20 
.48 
.15 
.00 
.41 
.88 
.69 
.00 
.46 
.55 
.71 
.00 

.32 
.00 
24 
15 
75 
10 
83 
30 
65 
15 
38 
55 

00 
00 
74 
00 
00 



ARCH DEACON DRANE ENTERS SANATORIUM. 



Rev. Frederick Drane, archdeacon of the Yukon, Alaska, 
who was preparing to return to his missionary field a short 
while ago, was delayed by illness. In the meantime, acting 
upon the advice of his physician, he has entered a sana- 
torium near Asheville for treatment, probably for six or 
eight months. His condition though not critical is regard- 
ed as serious as there is some lung trouble involved. 

Mr. Drane was accompanied by his wife, formerly Miss 
Rebecca Wood, well known in the eastern part of the State. 
Their child, about one year old, has been taken to Hillsboro 
by her devoted aunts, Mrs. Frank Wood and Miss Henrietta 
Collins, who will remain there for some time. 



Bishop Darst held services at Cathedral of St. John-the- 
Divine, New York, in July. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



SOCIAL GATHERING— PARISHES BERTIE GROUP. 



The second annual social gatneriug of the tamilies of ihe 
four parishes in Bertie Coumy, Holy Innocents, Avoca, 
ii't. iviani's, Koxouel; bt. Tnomas', Windsor; ana Grate 
Church, Woodville, was had with tne congregation of Giace 
Church, VVoodville, on Wednesday, August 11, 1926. The 
first of these gatherings was held with at. Thomas' Parish, 
Windsor, on the lawn of Windsor Castle. The very large 
gathering was entertained in the splendid home and mag- 
nificent oak grove of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Griffin. Eaca 
parish was largely represented. The day was balmy and 
beautiful and the occasion a perfect one. 

Rev. A. J. Mackie, Rector of the Parishes, hai general 
charge of the day's pleasures and program. He led the 
audience in prayer. Miss Stella Phelps, of Woodville, ex- 
tended a most gracious and cordial welcome. Unusually 
felicitous responses were made for the other Parishes by 
Mrs. George W. Capehart, Avoca; Miss Annie Norfleet, 
Roxobel, and Mrs. Charles F. L,yon, Windsor. 

Beautiful musical numbers were sung by Mrs. C. J. 
i&awyer, of Windsor, and Miss Mary Johnson, of Norfolk., 

»Rev. Morrison Bethea, former Rector of Grace Church 
and St. Mark's, gave a very felicitous address, humorous and 
pleasing. He expressed pleasure and pride in the very 
strong and cordial spirit of cooperation and friendliness 
apparent on all hands moving these parishes. Mr. Bethea 
was greatly beloved by his Bertie parishioners. 

Judge Francis D. Winston delivered an address filled with 
reminiscences and memories of the Woodville community. 
His strong and touching tribute to the men and women 
who have sustained an ideal citizenship here, home loving, 
state serving and God fearing), were most pleasing to 
their worthy descendants. 

Judge Winston told a number of historic and striking 
incidents in the life of the community in both revolutionary 
and modern times and in business, social ana religious lire. 
He pronounced this community as the "ideal spot where 
still obtain the gifts and graces of our old civilization and 
the push and progress of the new." 

And now comes the dinner. Under giant oak, in dense 
shade, at long extended tables the company gathered for a 
* meal of every variety of wholesome and delectable food. 
• Bertie County housewives were at their best here. The din- 
ner was the equal of those served by the ultra aristocratic of 
the old days, partaken of by the descendants of heroic 
statesmen, and citizens of high degree, with the wholesome 
commingling of friends and kindred of gentle birth. 

After dinner Mr. Mackie "put on the stunts"; children's 
foot races, potato races, bag races, egg carrying spoon 
races, all participated in by boys and girls. A few fat races, 
men and women, had in them more of amusement than 
speed. 

During the afternoon an orchestra composed of Colon 
Harrell, violin, Peter Parker, saxaphone, Drew Bazemore, 
banjo and guitar, and Miss Temperance Britton, drum, 
writh Miss Mary Sipivey at the piano, rendered charming and 
inspiring music. 

The service of melons and fruits closed the day, long to 
be remembered. 

ETery one pronounced it an ideal occasion, held on an 
ideal day, at an ideal spot, by an ideal people. The pres- 
' ence of Miss Mary Bond Upchurch, a daughter of the late 
Hon. Lewis Thompson, Whig orator and statesman, added 
greatly to the intereist of the occasion. She is nearing her 
four-score and was an interested participant in the day's 
joy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Griffin were heartily thanked; 
and so were all the ladies and gentlemen who assisted 
them. 

Mr. Mackie was warmly congratulated. 



MIMOMALS 



MISS ALICE PHELPS. 

Miss Alice i^neips, a aevoted memoer of ijt. David s Parish 
Cresweu, in. C, ana lor many years a greatly ueioved resi- 
uent 01 mat village, aied at the home of her niece, Mrs. J. 
c. uauiiu on August i!/tn, 1926, following a brief illness in 
tne iuin. year of ner age. Burial was maue on tne following 
uay in oi. uavid s churchyard. The funeral was conductea 
Dy the Hev. Theodore Partrick, Jr., in the absence of the 
rtector, [ue Kev. C. h\ Williams. 

Miss Phelps is survived by two nieces, Mrs. J. C. Gatlin, 
01 cresweii, Mrs. K. W. TarKenion, of JNortolk, Va., and by 
a nepiiew, Mr. K. M. Phelps, Jr., of Kaleign. She was a 
sister of the late Rev. H. H. Phelps, for many years Rector 
01 tne Ciiurch in Weldon. She was a truly good woman, 
iier lite being manned by loyalty to Church and family, 
^he was a faithful member of St. David's Pansu. 



JULIAN NIXON, JUNE 9th, 1926. 

■'The shortness and uncertainty of human life" have rarely 
been brought home with such appalling suddenness as 
when Julian Nixon lost his life in an automobile accident. 

He was in his twenly-sixth year the only son and brother 
in a prominent family of Hertford, N. C. 

On the morning of June the 9th he took part in the mar- 
riage of his sister, one of the happiest among the many 
friends and relatives of the lovely bride, who thronged the 
little parish church. It was a scene of unclouded beauty 
and happiness, in sharpest contrast with the gloom which 
fell over the entire community with the news which united 
in a common sorrow all who had shared in the joy of the 
morning. 

There are no words for such a grief as thai. All hearts 
go out in aching sympathy with the family so tragically 
bereft. But for all who loved the boy, it is sweet to re- 
member what a happy life he had, how rich in the love of 
family and friends. And under all these was a serious side, 
best known to those who knew him best. The questionings 
which are in the air of these uncertain days, came to this 
young mind, but never shook his loyalty to the Church he 
loved. 

When friends and kindred filled the church for the last sad 
rites, one could not but feel that in the prayers and Psalms 
of the new Burial Service, "God has sent His people a mes- 
sage of peace," so wonderfully beautiful and uplifting they 
are, not shutting our loved ones away, but including them, 
as one with us still. 

As the long procession moved through the Churchyard, 
a robin was singing, softly at first, then louder and clearer 
as we neared the great pine from which the hidden singer 
poured his vesper hymn. Clear and joyous, through hymn 
and prayers to the Benediction, came the robin's song, 
in tune with the whispering pines and the river flowing 
softly past, while all felt the softened glory of the sinking 
sun. And as the clear notes followed us on our homeward 
way, this seemed their burden: — "The boy is safe home 
in his Father's keeping; He is not far from any one of us. 
Lift up your hearts!" MINNIE ALBERTS?ON. 



A GOOD SIGN. 

The other week-end day when we were stopping art the 
Gaston Hotel, New Bern, we got the following invitation 
along with key to our room: 

"You are crdially invited to attend Divine Service on 
Sunday at Christ Episcopal Church." 

We understood this to be the work of St. Andrew's Broth- 
erhood. It made us feel that we were in the hands of 
friends. G. F. C. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



TLbc /Ifttsston Iberalb. 

ORGAN OF THE! DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLJNA 

Published Monthly at 

AYDBN, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Subscription One Dollar A Year 



EDITORIAL. STAFF: 
Editor: 

REV. G. F. CAMERON, B.A., B.D. 

Contributing Editors: 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. LARST. D.D , 
REV. R. B. DRANE, D.D., 
REV. JAMES' E. W. COOK, 
MRS. HENRY J. McMILI^N. 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

NOTICE OF ENTRY. 

Application has been made tor mailing at special rate 
ot postage. 

Subscribers changing their addresses, or tailing to receive 
their papers, should promptly notify the Manager, giving 
when necessary, both the old and new addresses. 

Subscribers wishing to discontinue their subscriptions 
should so notify the Manager, as an absence of such notifl- 
cation is considered a continuance of the subscription. 

All articles for publication should reach the Business 
Manager by the 25th of the month. New subscriptions, 
renewals, requests for change of address and copy for ad- 
vertisements should be sent to 

REV. G. F. CAMERON, 
Ayden, N. C. 

The July and August issues of the Mission Herald were 
not published. 



A PARTING WORD. 

It is with sincere regret that I drop the editorial "we" 
after six year's employment of it, to address this little 
personal note to the readers of the Mission Herald. First 
of all, I want to say that it has given me a great deal ot 
pleasure to edit the paper. This pleasure has in large part 
arisen from the feeling that the Bishop, the clergy and 
people of the diocese of East Carolina have been behind 
me. I have greatly appreciated your patience, tolerance 
and fine co-operation. 

I want further to recommend the new editor, the Rev. 
G. F. Cameron, to your consideration. Mr. Cameron's fine 
work in the Diocese, his thorough training, and his devo- 
tion to the cause of the Church in East Carolina entitles 
him to the support that I know you will give. I ask for 
him the same fine co-operation that you have given me, 
and shall confidently expect the Mission Herald to develop 
its great possibilities for usefulness. 

THEODORE PARTRICK, JR. 



HOW IT WAS DONE. 

Telegram From Bishop Darst. 

"Wilmington, N. C, Aug. 21, 1926. 
Rev. G. F. Cameron, Ayden, N. C. 

I have appointed you editor of the Mission Herald. Hope 
you will accept. THOMAS' C. DARST." 

Confirmation of his telegram is given in the following 
letter: 



"Diocese of Bast Carolina, 
Bishop's House, 
Wilmington, N. C, 
August 21, 1926. 
Rev. G. F. Cameron, Ayden, N. C. 

My dear Cameron: It gives me much pleasure to appoint 
you as editor of the Mission Herald to fill the unexpired 
term ot the Rev. Theodore Partrick, Jr. 

As you doubtless know, the editor of the Mission Herald 
is elected each year at the meeting of the Diocesan Con- 
vention 

Hoping to have your acceptance soon, 1 am, with kind 
regards and best wishes. Yours faithfully, 

THOMAS C. DARST." 



OUR REPLY. 

"St. James' Rectory, Ayden, N. C, 
August 23rd, 1926. 
Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D.D., Bishop of East Carolina, 
Wilmington, N. C. 
My dear Bishop Darst: Replying to your te;egram of the 
21st instant, stating that you had appointed me Editor of 
the Mission Herald, official organ of the Diocese of East 
Carolina. 

Your goodness and thoughtfulness have filled me with 
humble gratitude. 1 am deeply sensible of the fact that 
an excathedra appointment does not absolutely guarantee 
that 1 am worthy and well qualified. In fact, I feel un- 
worthy of the honor and task you have bestowed upon me, 
and I could not accept did I not know that I had your fullest 
sympathy and the heartiest co-operation of the clergy and 
laity of the Diocese of East Carolina. 

Assuring you that it is with such sentiment and an inex- 
pressible gratitude that I accept the Editorship of the Mis- 
sion Herald, believe me, 

Your humble servant in Christ, 

G. F. CAMERON." 



CONCLUSION. 

"Diocese of Bast Carolina, 

Bishop's House, 

Wilmington, N. C. 

August 30, 1926. 

Rev. G. F. Cameron, Ayden, N. C. 

My dear Cameron: Your good letter of the 23rd was 
read with much pleasure, and I am delighted to know of 
your acceptance of the Editorship of the Mission Herald 



Your brethren of the Clergy will give their hearty ap- 
proval of my appointment, and co-operate with you in every 

way in their power 

With love and best wishes for you and yours, 1 am. 
Yours faithfully, 

THOMAS C. DARST." 



1 authorize the following prayers for use in the Diocese 
of East Carolina: Thos. C. Darst. 

"O Lord, we beseech thee, send thy blessing on the 
Bishops' Crusade undertaken in thy Name. Fill all leaders 
and workers with thy Holy Spirit that they may spread 
their message with burning zeal, touching the hearts of 
all hearers and bringing them to true repentance and the 
consecration of their lives in thy service, to the end that 
thy Gospel may be spread and thy Kingdom enlarged; 
through Jesus Christ our Lord." AMEN. 



"Almighty God, whose S'on Jesus Christ came to cast fire 
upon the earth; grant that by the prayers of thy faithful 
j)eople a fire of burning zeal may be kindled and pass from 
heart to heart, that the light of thy Church may shine 
forth bright and clear; through the same, thy Son, Jesus 
Christ our Lord." AMEN. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



EDITORSHIP LIKENED UNTO A JOURNEY. 

Having made our initial bow,, we come now face to face 
with our task. What do we see? Well, we see our task in 
the nature of many journeys across the seas into a far 
country. We shall always be on what we believe to be 
the right ship, and we know that we shall always have the 
right compass. But even with these advantages we shall 
not always be absolutely certain of a safe voyage and land- 
ing. Each ship that we travel upon shall have a different 
name. One shall be christened Temperance, another S'ocial 
Injustices in the Light of Christ, another World Peace, and 
we should like to travel many times upon the stately ship 
called Charity. There are many ships, each bearing a differ- 
ent name, but all requiring the same passport, the one 
known as Courage. Now, we know that all these ships will 
not make the voyage without encountering storms and some- 
times shipwreck. Some will leave the home port and sink 
in mid-ocean; some will sail for a few days and return home 
because of approaching storms from the Torrid Zone or 
sight of Icebergs drifting from the Frozen North; some 
will reach their destination, but shall be battered and 
beaten because of the roughness of the journey. We only 
hope that the crew will keep courage and the spirit o'f ad- 
venture; and, if they do that, they shall ever be happy be- 
cause thus employed. The world has a standing call for 
"men to go down to the sea in ships." 

There is ever present, just a little way up the shore line, 
a ship that is called Indifference or Smug Complacency. 
It gives every assurance that it will land its passengers 
safely upon any shore. The basis of those assurances is 
its pagan customs, which it parades as virtues and which 
hold it down. It guarantees that its hull will be held 
down to the water line through every stormy wind that 
blows, and that no fury can make it tremble. However, if 
the hull ever trembles, forthwith the name begins to change. 
If there is enough trembling, the name changes entirely; 
and instead of indifference we may have such beautiful 
names as Love, Charity, and Magnanimity. We have firm- 
ly resolved not to get on that ship called Indifference! 

We are bending every effort to get our Passport of Cour- 
age; and we are in high hopes that every ship upon which 
we sail shall carry some great and good name. Do you 
wish us Bon Voyage? G. F. C. 



THERE'S A RUSTLE IN THE MULBERRY LEAVES. 

The Conference of the Clergy to be held at Wrightsville 
Beach, the 15th and 16th of September, will be history- 
making in the Diocese of East Carolina. We have con- 
versed freely with many of the clergy; and, without a sin- 
gle exception, they are all anxious to preach the Gospel of 
Christ. All of them are humble enough to admit that they 
are not skilled in the art of "conducting revivals," but con- 
fess that the Sipirit leads in that direction. They have 
heard the Voice; their hearts are filled with conviction; 
they have real spiritual energy which they wish to use 
freely for the Master. To go to that Conference and be- 
come a part of it is irresistible! Will the Church people in 
the Diocese of East Carolina be touched and healed by 
this Spirit? The spirit is stirring in the mulberry leaves. 
Can we make this small movement grow until it becomes 
a mighty, sweeping, spiritual whirlwind? The fundamen- 
tals of a Revival are contained in II Chronicles 7:14, "If 
my people, which are called by my name, shall humble 
themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from 
their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will 
forgive their sin, and will heal their land." We shall re- 
port in the next issue what happens at the Conference. 

G. F. C. 



can Legion, covered himself with glory at the American 
Legion Convention held at Hickory, N. C, by denouncing 
forcefully the custom of drinking where soldiers are gath- 
ered together. He is himself a soldier of the finest type, 
a fact which nobody questions; he stated in clearest terms 
that it is not prudery to be temperate; his speech was ex- 
temperaneous, yet contained unescapable logic, it was 
truthful and compelling; and for these reasons he left 
conviction in the hearts of his hearers 

It is unusual for the soldier to preach against intemper- 
ance. According to the old military standards, as long as 
a soldier performed his duty in line of action, and did 
not damage his fellow-men or his country's property, nobody 
was supposed to question his moral standards or personal 
behavior. There is a reason for this,— unadulterated mili- 
tarism is begotten of blind instincts, like fear, jealousy, and 
hatred, and can only thrive in the realm of the carnal. It is 
really a short step from the instincts that manifest them- 
selves in war and the ones that show up in intoxication. The 
movement during the late World War that opposed the 
"gassing of noncombatants," and "bombing of innocent 
sleepers," was something new in the annals of war; and, if 
such humane considerations continue to grow, and grow 
enough, there shall some day be no more wars. 

Mr. Gribben is among the few who have stood up be- 
fore the Commanding Officer, the Commissioned Personnel, 
the whole rank and file, and made a sweeping condemna- 
tion of a practice that violates their ideals. Of course, only 
a small number of soldiers drink, but even these are suf- 
ficient to create a problem and bring a whole organization 
into disrepute. And the more an organization acquiesces 
in this practice the more is its character questioned. Why? 
Because strong acquiescence soon pales off into positive ap- 
proval. We admire Mr. Gribben for his courage and sol- 
dierly qualities and congratulate the American Legion that 
he is their Chaplain G. F. C. 



PRELIMINARY SKIRMISHES. 



THE AMERICAN LEGION AND DRINKING. 

The Rev. R. E.. Gribben, Rector of St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church, Winston-Salem, N. C, and Chaplain of the Ameri- 



Once upon a time the boss of a railroad section gang, 
a man named Finnigin, was criticised by his superinten- 
dent for writing ten pages about a wreck that had occur- 
red on his section. When the next wreck happened Finni- 
gin spent a whole night boiling down his report, which 
finally read: 

"Off agin. On agin. 
Gone agin. Finnigin." 

We have never doubted this report because of its brevity. 
In fact, we have always liked it because it was unequivo- 
cal and could not be misunderstood. 

We believe that too many of us are unlike Finnigin- 
whose statements were positive and certain. It is very 
difficult today to find one who knows enough about a given 
phenominenon to say that it "really is" or "really isn't." 
Statements are so mild that they carry no conviction; 
phrases are so conditioned that they are vain shadows; 
words are so considerate that they go unheeded. What is 
still worse, positive statements are often denied outrightly. 

We have in mind the contemplated Bishops' Crusade. 
"The Church is as idle as a painted picture," is a phrase 
subscribed to by the National Commission on Evangelism; 
and, like Finnigin's report, carries conviction, yet there 
are already cries going up that this statement is either 
misleading or absolutely untrue. The Buffalo Courier says: 

"Instead of a period of idleness, history may record 
the pres,ent years as the most fruitful, perhaps not for 
creeds, but surely for religion, up to the year 1926. 
the "Bishops' Crusade" by which the Episcopal Church 
hopes to increase its membership 100,000, is just one 
of manj^ undertakings that show the activity of the 
church." 

Bishop Joseph M. Francis, of Indianapolis, emas- 



10 



THE itlSSION HERALD. 



culates the Commission's .statement by saying: "I 
deny that the analogy between a painted picture and 
the church is true. The church is not idle. Less ener- 
getic, less effective, less devoted than it ought to be, 
I grt.nt, but not idle." 

Now, we can so devitalize the Commission's report, that 
not a vestige of our problem will remain and we shall lose 
all that we have so far accomplished in getting a Crusad- 
ing Army recruited and compaigning. Of course, there are 
pleasant streams in the Episcopal Church where one may 
refresh himself; ibut there are also many imperfections 
that cannot be overlooked. A person with a malignant 
growth in his vitals cannot cure himself by beholding his 
beautiful feet. In like manner, the Episcopal Church can- 
not extend itself effectively without attacking its weak- 
ness and fighting for its existence. We enjoy the solitude 
and refreshment that our Church is giving us, but we are 
not blind to some of its grave effects. For instance, we 
know mission stations in our own land with two or three 
communicants that have not changed for a quarter of a 
Century; we know of Parishes that have not had a satis- 
factory minister for a quarter of a century; we know com- 
municant lists that have remained absolutely static for 
nearly one hundred years; we know congregations that 
have done nothing constructive in the Kingdom in all its 
history; and, although, we may own one-tenth of the na- 
tion's wealth, we give far less per capita than the Re- 
formed Church in America and the Reformed Presbyterian 
Church and other smaller and less wealthy denominations, 
according to George Foster Peapoby, of New York City. 
We do not know to what extent these conditions prevail in 
the general Church, and we doubt if any one person does. 
We do know that they are general enough to warrant a 
definitely planned attack. They are imperfections that 
cannot be slightly dismissed, nor can they be explained 
away. If we admit these facts to be facts, and act accord- 
ingly, we have faith in the Bishops' Crusade and believe 
that it will succeed. On the other hand, if we go into the 
campaign half-heartedly, half-believing, our efforts shall 
be in vain; and the Episcopal Church will continue to keep 
alive in the future as it has in the past, namely, by natural 
increase through births. The Bishops' Crusade is still in 
the preliminary skirmish stage, and it will succeed only 
in proportion as it believes in itself and its task. If they 
have confidence they will be like Finnigin, 'On agin"; if 



CHURCH KALENDAR SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER, 1926. 



they doubt themselves, they will be "Off agin." 



SEEING AND HEARING. 



G. P. C. 



We cannot see Thee in worlds beyonfl. 

We can see enduring foot-prints here 
Where all nature teaches us of thee, — 

The contagious laughter of children. 
The fidelity of a lover. 

The strong cooling breeze of Thy waters, 
The glad reveille of the dawning. 

The restful spectacle of sun-set, 
The welcome retreat of closing day. 

And hear Thy voice in the singing stars. 

G. F. C. 

THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS. 

For the next six months the Bishop's address, for all 
personal and Diocesan mail, will be: 

Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D.D., 

Apartment 432, Cathedral Mansions, 

Washington, D. C. 
All mail relating to the Bishops' Crusade, etc., should be 
addressed: 

National Commission on Evangelism, 

Mount St. Albans, 

Washington, D. C. 



"O live ye by the Kalendar, 

And with the good ye dwell; 

The Spirit that came down on them, 

Will Lighten you as well." — Bishop Coxe. 



Oct. 



Sept. 26— 17th Sunday after Trinity 
29— S'. Michael and All Angels 
3— 18th Sunday after Trinity 
10— 19th Sunday after Trinity 
17— 20th Sunday after Trinity (Green. Red 
18 — S. Luke, Evangelist 
i24 — 21st S'unday after Trinity 
28 — SiSi. Simon and Jude 
21 — 22nd S'unday after Trinity 

(Green. White for eve.) 



(Green) 
(White) 
(Green) 
(Green) 
for eve.) 

(Red) 
(Green) 

(Red) 



Marriage Announcements. 

Rev. and Mrs. George W. Lay announce the marriage of 
their daughter Ellen Booth to Mr. Harold Hodgkinson on 
Monday, the nineteenth of July, nineteen hundred and twen- 
ty-six at St. Paul's Church, Beaufort, North Carolina. 



The Mission Herald has received the following marriage 
announcement and wishes for Mr. and Mrs. Griffith un- 
ending marital happiness and prosperity: 

Mrs. Daniel David Davies announces the marriage of her 
daughter Daisy Dean to the Rev. John Hammond Griffith, 
on the thirtieth of June, one thousand, nine hundred and 
twenty-six, at CuUowhee, North Carolina." 

Mr. Griffith was once Rector of S't. Mary's, Kinston, and 
is a former Editor of the Mission Herald. 



HOW CLERGY SPENT THEIR VACATION. 



Rev. George F. Cameron preached at Christ Church, New 
Bern, during month of August. 

Rev. Herbert Cone spent month of August in the North. 

Rev. C. E. Williams visited relatives in Pomona, Florida, 
during August. 

Rev. R. B. Drane, D.D., attended Summer S'chool at Se- 
wanee. 

Rev. G. W. Lay, D.C.L., attended Summer School at Valle 
Crucis. 

Rev. J. W. Heyes preached at St. James', Wilmington, 
during August. 

Rev. Archer Boogher visited relatives and friends in 
Virginia. 

Rev. James E. W. Cook visited relatives in Philadelphia 
in June. 

Rev. C. O. Pardo preached at St. Luke's Church, Scranton, 
Pa., during July and August. 

Rev. E. T. Jillson spent July and August in Rhode Island. 

Rev. H. G. England had charge of services at Highlands, 
N. C, for month of August. 

Reb. Guy H. Madara visited in New Jersey, during month 
of August. 

Rev. W. R. Noe held mission at Haymarket, Va., for Rev. 
H'arrell J. Lewis, August 1-8 inclusive. 

Rev. Stephen Gardner held services at Blowing Rock, 
during July. 

Rev. J. B. Gibble spent month of August at Beaufort, his 
old home. 

Rev. W. H. Milton, D.D., was at Linville during August. 

Rev. E. W. Halleck spent three weeks of August at Sa- 
luda, N. C. 

Rev. Alexander Miller, wife and daughter visited rela- 
tives in Philadelphia. 

Rev. and Mrs. A. J. Mackie visited relatives in Pennsyl- 
vania during July and August. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



11 



Personal Items. 



COMMENCEMENT AT ST. MARY'S. 



On All Saints' Day, November 1st, 1926, the Rev. Robert 
B. Drane, D.D., will celebrate his 50th anniversary as Rec- 
tor of St. Paul's Church, Edenton, N. C. 

Bast Carolina has made an appropriation of $85.00 to- 
wards the salary and hospitality expense of a woman Stu- 
dent-Secretary for the Church students at the North Caro- 
lina College for Women at Greensboro, N. C. 



Dr. Lula Disosway.Medical Missionary from Christ Church, 
New Bern, N. C , sailed the latter part of August for her 
work in the District of Shanghai. STie has been a source of 
inspiration to the Church women of East Carolina. We 
predict that her ine light will shine no less dim in the 
Mission Field of China. May her career be one of great 
joy and happiness! 



The graduating class of the Summer School of the East 
Carolina Teacher's Training College, voted unanimously 
to have the Rev. James E. W. Cook, of St. Paul's Church, 
Greenville, N. C, deliver the Baccalaureate Address on 
August 27th, 1926. 



While in New Jersey the Rev. James E W. Cook preached 
for the Rev. D. C. McKinnon, D.D., at S't. Mark's, Pleasant- 
ville. Dr. MacKinnon is most happily situated, and re- 
cently opened a $6,000 organ in his church. He sends best 
wishes to friends in East Carolina. Mr. Cook writes fur- 
ther: "Two weeks ago I preached at St. John's, Chew's 
Landing, N. J., an old stone church towards which George 
Washington donated 20 guineas." 



The Rev. W. R. Noe conducted a mission at Zion, Beaufort 
County, for Rev. H'oward Alligood, beginning August 30th. 



A copy of Bishop Darst's picture may be o'otained free 
by sending request to Editor of the Mission Herald, Ayden, 
N. C. 

The Rev. and Mrs. Wm. B. Cox, of Richmond, Va., 
visited in East Carolina a few days during August. 



The Rev. Charles B. Williams, of St. David's, Creswell, 
will conduct a preaching mission at Old St. John's Church, 
Pitt County, N. C, beginning October 4th, 1926. 



The Rev. J. W. Heyes has resigned the rectorate of Em- 
manuel Church, Farmville, to accept call to St. James' 
Church, Eufaula, Diocese of Alabama. He has been in 
Farmville about three years, and has done a great deal of 
constructive work there. His many friends in East Caro- 
lina regret to see him leave and wish for him and his 
good family immeasurable success and happiness in their 
new work. He began his new work September 1st. 



At a meeting of the Standing Committee, Edenton, July 
1st, 1926, consent was given to the absence of Bishop Darst 
from the Diocese that he might further the work of the 
National Commission on Evangelism. 



At the Field Day of the Pitt County Auxiliaries, held at 
Green Wreath Park near Farmville, July 6th, the Rev. B. 
E. Brown, of Calvary Church, Tarboro, gave a very en- 
lightening address on "The Clergy and Evangelism"; Mrs. 
James G. Staton, of Williamston, helped a great deal in her 
address on "Women's Work in the Church"; the Rev. 
Guy H'. Madara, of Christ Church, New Bern, spoke ear- 
nestly and forcefully on "Experiences in Alaska"; Mrs. B. 
T. Cox, of Winterville, spoke very beautifully on "The Get- 
Together Spirit"; and the Rev. G. F. Cameron, of Ayden, 
hinted at "Some Problems and Perplexities of a Rural 
Clergyman.'^ 



The recent Commencement at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, ((founded in 1842) was noteworthy in several re- 
spects. 

The graduating class of thirty-seven girls was the largest 
in the history of the school and included representatives 
frcm seven states, from Cuba and from the Philippines. 

Certificates were given in Organ, Voice, Piano, Art, Home 
Economifs, S'tenography, Typewriting and Bookkeeping. 

An impressive feature of Class Day was the long proces- 
sion of alumnae marching to the exercises, held under the 
great oalis in the grove, in order of classes, headed by a 
member of the class of 1857-58. 

The Alumnae Luncheon was largely attended by alumnae 
from other states as well as from North Carolina. Gifts 
to the school were presented by the class of 1904 — holding 
a special reunion — and by the classes of 1925 and 1926. 
The alumnae and visitors were greatly interested in the 
large and well equipped swimming pool, which was opened 
to the students during the spring term. 

Announcement was made that the new organ for the 
Chapel — the special work this year of the alumnae — will be 
ready for use early in September. The registration list for 
the year 1926-27 session is far ahead of the average year. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS PAID SINCE MAY, 1926 



Those paying one dollar: Mr. H. C. Hines, Mrs. A. B. 
Hontz, Mrs. P. F. Corbin, Mrs. J B. Flora, Mrs. H. M. S, 
Cason, Mrs. H. C. Jackson, Mrs. Richard Williams, Mrs. W. 
G. Elliott, Mrs. Lilly Baxter, Mr. R. D. Dixon, Mrs. John 
S'anford, Mrs. G. A. Cardwell, Mr. G. B. Cowper, Mr. J. M. 
Vail, Mrs. M. B. Boyle, Mrs. L. G. Tripp, Mrs. R. A. Bur- 
nett, Mr. W. D. Pruden, Mrs. H. C. Prince, Mrs. W. E. 
Spruill, Mrs. J. M. Pool, Mrs. W. F. Dick, Mrs. R. B. Miller, 
Mrs. H. A. Baur, Rev. J. B. Brown, Mrs Thomas Broadfoot, 
Mrs. Mary Gray, Mr. R. C. Bagby, Mrs. F. S'. Duffy, Mrs. 
C. A. Bowen, Mr. E. A. Council, Mrs. William Russ, Mr. G. 
H. Hall, Mrs. A. T. Uzzell, Mrs. K. D. Crawford, Mrs. W. 
W. Griffin, Miss Dita Roberts, Rev. W. E. Cox, Mrs. E. S. 
Askew, Dr. W. H. Ward, Mr. W. J. Rice, Mrs. F. S. Hodge, 
Mr. J. W. Gordan, Mrs. Chas. Griffin, Miss Mattie Parker, 
Miss Helen G. Simith, Mr. H. E Rodga, Mr. C. H. Robinson, 
Mrs. S. A. Norfleet, Mrs. A. H. Worth, Mrs. J. J. McNoward, 
Mrs E. S'trudwick, Mrs. Fannie B. Jacobs, Mr. J. C. Bogg] 
Mr. D. T. Gaskins, Mrs. C. F. Warren, Mrs. E. B. Ficklen, 
Mrs. C. H. Turner, Mrs A. M. Waddell, Mrs. Harriett Clark- 
son, Rev. G. F. Cameron, Mrs. W. T. Fowden, Mrs. Wallace 
Hufflnes, Mrs. W. D Harlow, Mr. C. C. Chadbourn, Mrs. 
Charles Skinner, Mrs. John D. Bellamy, Mrs. J. C. Cherry, 
Mr. T. E. Shore 50c., Mrs. S. H Abbott, Mr. H. J. Vauni 
Mrs. C. C. Winslow, Miss Laura Hughes, Miss Louise Hill, 
Miss Lissa Newell, Mr. B. R. King, Miss Annie Payne, 
Rev. G. W. Lay, Mrs. D. L. Dixon, Mrs. B. G. Willis, Mrs. 
G. C. Lang, Mrs. C. E. Hale, Mrs. S'tatz Credle, Mr. J. C. 
Gatlin, Mr. E. S , Moratt, Miss Margaret Bryan. Mr. W. B. 
Harvey, Mrs. Leinster Duffy, Miss JeaTiie Berkley, Miss 
Bessie Haydn, Mrs. L. V. Morrill, Mrs. T. B. Shalllngton, 
Mr. E. V. Ferrell. Total $92.50. 

Those paying more than one dollar: Mrs. Geo. William- 
son, $2.00; Mr. C. G. Oden, $2.00; Mrs. F. B Drane, $5.00; 
Mr. P. H. Scott, $5.00; Mr. F M. Wooten. $2.00; Mrs. W. 
S. Caraman, $1.50; Mr. Fred Whitehurst, $5.00; Mrs. P. H 
Scott, $3 00; Mrs. W. O. Mosley, $3.00; Mrs. Cooper Person, 
$4.00; Mr. Fred Grist, $2.00; Mrs. J. G. Staton, $C00; Miss 
Pauline Tolar, $4.00; Mrs. J. R. H'iatt, $2.00; Dr V. E. 
Meyher, $2.00; Mr. G. B. Elliott, $5.00; Mrs. John Harvey, 
$2.00; Mrs. C. W. Tatum, $3.00; Mrs. T. D. Davis, $3.00; 
Miss Effle Waldo, $4.00; Mr. J. J. Stone, $3.00; Mr. Geo. C. 
Royall, $3.00. Total $71.50. 

Total for June, July, and August, $164.00. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE AND TRAINING INSTITU- 
TION, C.HARLOTTE, N. 0. 



OUR LOSS. 



CASH CONTRIBUTIONS' RECEIVED FROM DIOCESE 
EAST CAROLINA, FROM JUNE 23, to AUG. 23, 1926. 



Wilmington, Miss Wilhelmina Harlow $ 6.00 

Merry Hill, Emily, Richard & Whitmell Staithwick 2.00 

Woman's Auxiliary, Diocese of East Carolina.... 200.00 

M'ilmington, S't. Mary's Guild of St. James' Church 25.00 

CONTRIBUTIONS IN KIND. 

Wilmington, H. C. McQueen — 4 issues Youth's Comi)anion. 
Wilmington, Mrs. J. F. Woolvin — Girls' clothing. 
Goldsboro, Circle 2 St. Stephen's W. A. — Box girls' cloth- 
ing containing 13 dresses. 



AUGUST AT THE. ORPHANAGE 

A delightful automobile outing was given the children 
and matrons by members of the Charlotte Civitan Club. 
Ice cream cones, cakes and enormous sticks of candy were 
a. part of the treat. This general thoughtfulness of the 
children on the part of the Civitians was greatly appre- 
ciated. One of the many nice features of the location of 
the Orphanage in the heart of Charlotte is that it enables 
the Orphanage children to be the recipients of many fa- 
vors at the hands of the civic and fraternal organizations 
of the city. 

On August 2nd, a happy group of boys returned from 
the Boy S'cout camp on the Catawba River. Through the 
kindness of Mr. Steere, chief scout executive, it was made 
possible for them to enjoy the full two weeks at camp. 
They were all greatly benefitted, and learned mudi from 
the instructions given by Mr. Steere on scouting and wood- 
craft. 

On Sunday morning, August 22nd, at eleven o'clock. 
Bishop Penick conducted the services and preached the ser- 
mon, which was very much enjoyed by everyone. 

On August 26th, one of the greatest events of the year 
for the children, the annual picnic at Lakewood Park, was 
greatly enjoyed by every boy and girl. Mr W. S. Orr, 
owner of the park, entertained the children with the ut- 
most hosi)itality, allowing them to enjoy to the fullest 
extent the pleasures of the tango swings, merry-go-round, 
swimming pool, boating on the lake and the menagerie. 
In the latter the children watclied with glee the antics 
of their old friends, the monkeys, bear, water buffalo, foxes 
and many others. The vociferous yells with which the 
children thanked Mr. Orr on leaving and the soundness 
with which they slept that night were true indications of 
the fine time every one had. 

The baseball leagues organized at the beginning of the 
summer are nearing the close of the playing season. In the 
older boys' league the Pirates are maintaining a handy 
lead over the rest of the league, consisting of the Giants. 
A hot contest is being waged in the older girls' league be- 
tween the Athletics and S'enators for supremacy, with the 
congressional team leading by the narrow margin of one- 
game. The girls are doing some good fielding and heavv 
hitting and the final games, are sure to be hot ones. In 
the little children's league, the Willys-Knights, White 
Steamers, Lincolns and Buicks have been battling for the 
pennant and the right of the winning team to attend the 
party given by the losers in the other two leagues to their 
victorious opponents. With only a few games to play the 
Buicks are a nose ahead of the Willys-Knights with both 
teams treading heavily on" the gas. Watch the results in 
next month's issue. 



It is with the keenest regret and the greatest sense of 
loss that we, the congregation of Grace Church, part with 
our beloved Rector, Rev. Theodore Partrick, Jr., who has 
accepted a call to Scotland Neck, N. C. For five years he 
has served us with sympathy and understanding. 

His faithfulness, his undaunted spirit, and his sympa- 
thetic understandidng has endeared him to the hearts of the 
whole town. He has touched the lives of our people, espec- 
ially those in deep distress. 

The community will lose a great leader. 

The people a dear friend. 

Grace Church a living light. 

We wish for him success in his new work, and may he 
have God's richest blessings 

Out of the town goes a lovely family, — the Partricks. 

While Scotland Neck will have them in person, Plymouth 
will have them in memory. — Mrs. L. P. Hornthal. 



AN INTERESTING MISSIONARY LETTER. 



■St. Valentine's Rectory, Fishtown Station, 
Cape Palmas, Liberia, 
June 9, 1926. 
Mrs. Wm. H. Von Eberstein, Church School Service League, 
Box 153, Washington, N. C. 

Dear Mrs. Eberstein:— Yours of the 24th of April, 1926, 
was duly received with pleasure, and in reply, I beg to say 
that the boys are extremely glad for your kind informa- 
tion. They further appreciate this service of yours which 
is yet undone. 

I am working entirely among heathens. Consequently 
their children are directly from heathenism. And by this 
you may know that the majority of them are of heathen 
parentage. Owing to this, am much inconvenienced so 
far as clothings are concerned. 

The Board allow me only 12 boys. But owing to the fact 
that the boys are too many in the village, and are too 
anxious to learn, I have taken in 28 boys besides girls who 
are 12 in number. And there are many others who are 
desirous to come in; but owing to the above stated reason, 
we are unable to take them in. Food business is also added 
to this trouble, in as much as the Board is only providing 
for 12 boys. 

As per your request, we will be thankful for: Blankets, 
Shirts, Pajamas, Caps and many other things which are 
necessary, that the boys and the girls there may send for 
their fellows afar off who are poor absolutely 

By mentioning some of the things that are needed, do 
not legard us as being ungrateful. As you know, a poor 
man alway^s asks for every thing he sees — and if he can 
not get it by donation, he wants to get it clandestinely or 
otherwise. Sw our mentioning some of the things that are 
needed, does not show any spirit of ungratefulness — only 
we are thanking you for it. 

I remain yours faithfully, S. WADE APPLETON. 

Superintendent Fishtown and Tenebo Stations. 



MISS MILTON ELECTED FIELD SECRETARY. 

Miss Ann Milton, who was- unanimously elected Field 
Secretary for Young People's Work at the Young People's 
Conference held in St. Peter's Church, Washington. June 
14th and 15th, has accepted the position and entered upon 
her duties on September 1st. Miss Milton is wonderfully 
well qualified for this office, and we hope and believe that 
she will accomplish much good in organizing new Service 
Leagues and in helping and strengthening those already 
existing. 



It is a mark of distinction to advertise in f/je Mission Herald. Wliy? 

si/c/i privilege only to firms of /i/g/iesf rating." 



Because we grant 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



13 



THE 339th BIRTHDAY sf VIRGINIA DARE 



(By THE REV. JAMES: E. 

It was my pleasure to attend the annual meeting of the 
Roanoke Colony Memorial Association this year as the 
guest of my friend, the Hon. E. G. Flanagan, the new 
State Representiitive from the First District. 

Thi^ Association owns sixteen acres, including Fort 
Raleigh, on the island of Roanoke, which it has preserved 
as a patriotic shrine for generations to come. Our he- 
loved Rev. Robert B. Drane, D.D., the half-century Rec- 
tor of Edenton, N. C, was largely instrumental in its forma- 
tion, and was for several years its President. The Rt 
Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, D.D., Bishop of the Diocese 
of North Carolina, is the present President of the Associa- 
tion. 

The interest in this year's gathering at the birthplace of 
the first child of English parentage born in the Western 
Hemisphere — Virginia Dare — ^was very much extendea 
through the action of the Hon. Lindsay C. Warren, M.C., 
of Washington, N. C. He introduced into Congress, and 
succeeding in obtaining the acceptance of a Bill(H.R. 5683) ; 
"to provide tor the erection of a tablet or marker at Sir 
Walter Raleigh's Fort on Roanoke Island, N. C, in mem- 
ory of Virginia Dare. ' and his speech made in the House 
of Representatives on May 17, 1926, brought the attention of 
the whole nation to the historic significance and value of 
this spot which patriotic North Carolinians had saved for 
the future. In addition to this valuable service, Mr. War- 
ren used his influence to procure the most prominent 
speaker possible for this year's celebration. An invitation 
was extended to S'ir Esme William Howard, Ambassador 
from the Court of St, James, to deliver the annual address. 

I doubt very much whether S'ir Esme had ever heard of 
Fort Raleigh or of Virginia Dare. He is a distinguished 
member of the most influential Roman Catholic family in 
the old country — the Howards of England: and had pre!: 
ably never noticed the little mite of humanity born 
the 18th of August, 1587, to Eleanor, daughter of Gov- 
ernor White, and wife to Ananias Dare, who was christ- 
ened on the following Sunday, Virginia, according to the 
rites of the Church of England. 

He evidently referred his invitation to the Home Gov- 
ernment, because he received and read at the Celebration 
a letter from Stanley Baldwin, the Prime Minister of Great 
Britain, endorsing and approving the commemoration of 
the first settlers under Sir Walter Raleigh: and, on its 
receipt, he accepted the Association's request with cor- 
diality. 

Mr. Flanagan and I left Greenville on Tuesday, Aug 17, 
and drove through the country to Elizabeth City, arriving 
shortly before supper time. We had reserved rooms at the 
Southern Hotel several weeks earlier, and so were 
among the fortunate ones. Bishop Darst had not done so, 
and it was my privilege to offer him the half of my room. 
In the morning I suggested, "Bishop, you ought to cultivate 
your gift of intonation: you snored beautifully." To which 
I received the unexpected rejoinder, "My brother, I might 
say the same to you; only I should have to omit the adjec- 
tive"! 

We attended the fine reception given Tuesday night by 
the citizens of Elizabeth City at the Country Club, and 
at 5 A. M. Wednesday, left on the U. S. Coast Guard Cutter, 
"Pamlico," for Fort Raleigh, being included among the 
guests of Congressman Warren. Breakfast was served on 
board. 

It is unnecessary here to describe the historic places we 
passed, or the distinguished company we met. The daily 
papers carried full reports. 

We arrived at the jetty on Roanoke Island about noon, 
and found the woods full of people. The population of the 



W. COOK. Greenville, N. C.) 

island is around 2,.j')0 — they were all there and probably as 
many more from the scattered communities in Dare and 
adjoining counties. Scores of boats, of all descriptions, 
lay moored to the pier, or tossed gaily on the rippling 
and sunbathed waters of the Pamlico Sound. 

A board walk up the sandy beach led to the beautiful 
twelve-acre grove where the dining tables were set, and the 
speaker's stand placed. We were admitted to the platform, 
and, listening to the music of the band, we awaited the 
coming of the illustrious speaker. 

Attended by his naval and military attaches, the Bishops 
of North and East Carolina Dioceses, ex-Secretary of the 
Navy the Hon. Josephus Daniels and many other celebrities, 
iSir Esme W. Howard arrived, and was noisily welcomed 
by the applauding crowd. 

Bishop Cheshire acted as Chairman, and made a few 
appropriate remarks as the head of the Memorial Associa- 
tion. Our own Bishop Darst offered the Invocation Judge 
Francis D. Winston read a list of notables present, who 
simply rose and bowed. Congressman Warren made a fine 
impression with his well-prepared address. Then the Am- 
bassador arose and for several minutes waited until the 
applause subsided, to make his speech. 

I could hear well, but the voice of the Ambassador failea 
to reach the hundreds who stood away off amid the trees. 
It was a dignified, beautffully phrased, and cordial message 
fiom the Old World to the New. His linking of the Co- 
lonial ambition of Sir Walter Raleigh with that of Cecil 
Rhodes in South Africa — the last of the British Colony 
builders — ^was strikingly good. Bishop Cheshire brought 
these exercises to a close with the B.enediciion. 

Hundreds came to shake Sir Esme by the hand — and he 
welcomed all comers with the greatest goodwill. Aristo- 
cratic dignity presented no condescension This great 
statesman of a great Empire, and of world-wide fame, 
met farmers and fishermen with the same democratic kind- 
liness that marked his greeting of clergymen and officers 
of rank. 

He felt at home in the crowd — he said so. For these 
people of our Eastern Coast, by name, by manner, by many 
a trick of speech, betray the fact of their British ancestry, 
of which they are still proud. 

Ambassador Howard is reported to have said later that it 
was easy for him to imagine himsely addressing a crowd at 
home. The points of resemblance were so many and strong 
that it was like a little bit of England on Roanoke Island. 

Generous provision had been made by the people of Dare 
County for the refreshment of the visitors, and dinner 
was eaten in the grove. 

A visit to the Fort, and to the stone marking the spot 
of the stockade of these early British settlers in the West, 
was followed by a concert given by the Norfolk Naval Band. 
"The White Doe," written by Mrs. S, S. Cotten, a member 
of St .Paul's Church, Greenville, was on sale, and found 
many purchasers. It is a fine metrical rendering of the 
old Indian legend of the fate which awaited Virginia Dare. 

Late in the afternoon the crowds gradually dispersed, 
and the waters of the sound were dotted with returning 
boat-loads of happy holiday-makers. 

Mr. Flanagan and I went over to Nag's Head for a couple 
of night's rest — ^much to the amusement of the mosquitoes! 
We climbed over the sand-hills or sand-mountains, until 
we imagined we were in the Siahara Desert. 

On our return home we confessed that the celebration of 
Virginia's Birthday had been a great success, and the whole 
trip thoroughly worth-while. These anniversaries tend to 
bind in closer bonds of affection and appreciation the Old 
Country and the New. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



MANY ATTEND EXERCISES AT LAYING OF CORNER- 
STONE OF ST. PETER'S PARISH HOUSE, 
WASHINGTON, N. C, JULY 2j, 1926. 



IMPRESS'IVE SPEECHES BY BISHOP DARST AND 
S. S. NASH 



In the presence of hundreds of members of the church, 
a number of visiting clergymen and otlier dignitaries, as 
well as friends of the church from other denominations; the 
exercises in connection with the laying" of the cornerstone 
of S't. Peter's new parish house were held Tuesday morn- 
ing at 11 o'clock. 

Gathered around the improvised tent which had been 
erected at one corner of the parish house foundation, the 
crowd watched interestedly as Bishop i-nomas C. Darst, 
using a silver trowel, put the corner-stone in place. The 
rendition of several hynms by the junior and senior choirs 
of the church, the talks made by Bishop Darst and S. S. 
Niash, of Tarboro, the placing of a number of articles in 
the box sealed within the large stone — all these helped to 
make up a most impressive program. 

The exercises were planned by Edmund H. Harding, 
general chairman of the parish house committee. Mr. 
Harding also directed the two choirs. 

Shortly after eleven o'clock, members of the choir, sing 
ing the processional hymn, marched from the main church 
building up on the subfloor of the parish house and took 
their places close by the corner-stone. They were follow- 
ed by the Bishop, Rector Stephen Gardner and visiting 
clergymen. Members of the church vestry were also in 
line. Following the scripture reading and prayers, the 
corner-stone was lowered into its designated place and 
Bishop Darst rose to congratulate the members of S't. 
Peter's parish upon their progressive spirit and love for 
their church. He said that never before had there been 
such a crying need for bringing the young people of the 
nation closer to the church. He spoke of the benefits which 
would result from the erection of the parish house and 
expressed the hope that the members of the church would 
continue the splendid work which they were doing.^ He 
then introduced Mr. S. S. Nash, of Calvary Church, Tar- 
boro, one of the leading laymen in this part of the state. 

Mr. Nash said that he had been in touch with St. Peter's 
parish for many years and that his association with it al- 
ways had been pleasant. He mentioned the organization 
of St. Andrew's Brotherhood here and spoke of the work 
of John G. Bragaw, Jr., in this connection. 

"Last year more than five hundred million dollars was 
spent in church construction work in this country," he 
said. "This is a splendid sign. Our only danger, however, 
is that we pay too much attention to the physical details 
in connection with this work, and too little attention to 
the spiritual side. We should not permit all of our thoughts 
to be taken up with notes, mortgages and other matters 
pertaining to financing. This work that you are doing is 
a most worthy one and I look for m;ich good to come 
from it." 

There were many other forceful points brought out by 
the speaker. Both talks were received with close and 
appreciative attention on the part of the large audience. 

Among the visiting clergymen who were in attendance 
at the services were the following: 

Rev. R. B. Drane, D.D., of Edenton; Rev. L. L. Williams, 
Pocomoke City, Md ; Rev. W. E. Cone, of Goldsboro; Rev. 
J. N. Bynum, of Belhaven; Rev. Howard Alligood, city; 
Rev. T. N. Brincefield, Aurora; Rev. J. W. Heyes, Farm- 
ville; Rev. W. R. Noe, Wilmington; Rev. S'. E. Matthews, 
Lake Landing; Rev. J. W. Cook, Greenville; Rev. Guy H. 
Madara, New Bern; Rev. Joseph M. Taylor, Chocowinity. 

Children of the parish, among them being descendants 
of those church members who had taken part in the corner- 



stone ceremonies of St. Peter's Church more than fifty 
years ago, deposited coins in the box, which was sealed 
inside the stone. Other objects of interest, including cop- 
ies of state and church papers, the church calendar, a 
history of the church, corn, wine and oil, and a record of 
the gracious gift given by Mrs. Laure E. Brown in the 
form of a memorial chapel, were placed inside the box. 
Trose who took part in the ceremony — in addition to the 
children — were J. K. Hoyt, Rev. Stephen Gardner, Carl 
Richardson, Mrs. W. S. Clark and others. 

The exercises were completed in less than an hour. De- 
spite the extremely hot weather, everybody remained until 
the concluding hymn and benediction. 

CONTENTS OF THE CORNER^S'TONE. 

Copy of the Prayer Book — By Mrs. Fannie C. Saunders. 

Copy of Church and State Papers — by Miss Sallie Mid- 
yette. 

Copy of Church Journal — By Mrs. Hannah Bonner. 

Copy of Church History — J. G. Bragaw, S'.W., by J. G. 
Bragaw, Jr., proxy. 

Copy of Calendar and Almanac — By Rev. Stephen Gardner 

Piece of Stone from King Solomon's Quarry — Donated 
by E. W. Ayers. 

Corn, Wine and Oil— By J. K. Hoyt. 



Young People's Department. 



MISS BILLIE MELICK, EDITOR OF DEPARTMENT. 

PRIZE WINNING SONG AT THE Y. P. S. L. CONFER- 
ENCE IN WASHINGTON IN JUNE. 



I — There is a town called Washington, Washington; 
Where the League sits it down, sits it down. 
And eats and drinks mid laughter free 
In honor of dear Bishop Darst, you see. 

CHORUS. 
To you, we pledge our hearts devotion. 
And we promise to be faithful, ever loyal and true. 
Adieu, Adieu, kind friend, Adieu, adieu, adieu. 
We can no longer stay with you. 
Will try to follow the teachings you have given. 
And may the world go well with you. 

II — He left his home in Wilmington, Wilmington, 
On Tuesday night he came to join, came to join 
The young folks in an hour of fun: 
And now, dear Bishop, we present this song. 

Chorus: 

Tune — -"There is a Tavern in the Town." 
S'ung by Holy Innocents' Y. P. S. L. Delegates of Seven 
Springs, N. C. 



HOLY INNOCENTS' SERVICE LEAGUE, LENOIR 
COUNAY. 



(By MRS'. C. B. JONES.) 

The Y. P. S. L. of Holy Innocents Parish, Lenoir county, 
N. C, held a service Saturday night, July 17th. We dis- 
pensed with all business as Bishop Larst, Mr Noe and Mr. 
Crimeron were with us. 

The service was led by our President, John William 
Hardy, after which different members of the League dis- 
cussed "Our Blessings" and the idea of sharing them. A 
number of boys and girls sang, "Count Your Blessing^.'' 

John William Hardy sang, "Where He Leads Me I Will 
Follow," as an offeratory. 

At the end of the service we had a very interesting a«d 
encouraging talk from each of our noted visitors. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



16 



Convocation of Colored Church Workers 



-IN- 



The Diocese of East Carolina. 



THE REV. J. W. HERRITAGB, D.D. 
THE REV. J. B. BROWN, Secretary. 
THE REV. R. I. JOHNSON. Editor. 

»UCotSSFUL YOUNG PEOPLE'S CONFERENCE. 



For some years the members of the Colored Convocation 
have been anxious to hold a Young People's Conference 
From this they have been deterred by the fact that to get 
any representative number to go would involve an expense 
which would be prohibitive. At the Young People's Service 
on Sunday afternoon of the Convocation a resolution was 
offered by the writer, the purpose of which was to over- 
come the difficulties of holding this meeting. The substance 
of the resolution was that a Young People's Conference be 
held the last of July or first week in August; that as many 
young people as could be urged to do so try to attend; that 
transportation might be free persons with cars were urged 
to carry all the young people their cars would hold; in 
order that there might be no hardship worked on the Church 
and congregation where the meeting would be held that 
each person attending take along his or her own basket, 
singly or in groups, — that the only cost be 25 cents each as 
a registration fee to provide funds with which to pay for 
printing, etc. '^' 

On August 5th, these suggestions were carried out to the 
letter in the Young People's Conference held at St. An- 
drew's Church, Goldsboro. The only mission group not rep- 
resented at this meeting was the Belhaven Group. There 
were in all about 70 young people in attendance. The three 
largest delegations were in the following order: St. Cyp- 
rian's, New Bern, 21; Haddock's Cross Roads and Washing- 
ton, 19; Fayetteville, (S't. Joseph's,) 16. Interesting papers 
and addresses were given; prayer groups were conducted; 
personal interviews were had. The young people lunched 
out of doors; the women of St. Andrew's served lemonade; 
Mr. Lightner of the Colored Presbyterian Church, donated 
watermelons; and Mr. Holder was as usual the very em- 
bodiment of cordiality. 

The next Conference is with St. Cyprinn's, New Bern, 
next July or August. Practically every delegation was home 
by dark, the. meeting having adjourned by 8 o'clock. Miss 
Poole, of New Bern, was elected President, Miss Waddell 
of Fayetteville, Secretary. The writer wishes here to exi 
press his thanks to Mr. Staith, Dr. Fisher and Prof. S-rnith 
of the Methodist Academy for transporting his delegates 
to the meeting. 



REPORT OF THE MEETING OF THE COLORED 
CONVOCATIAN. 

This is rather late to report the meeting of the Colored 
Convention which was held in Jvme with St. Joseph's 
Church, Fayetteville, N. C. The meeting was . interesting 
in every detail and under the presidency of Dean Herri- 
tage the business was all completed before the close. We 
hope to have the Dean's address in either this or the next 
issue of the Mission Herald. 

Outstanding features of the meeting were sermons by 
the Rev. Mr. Holder, the Rev. Mr. Cautien, and Bishop 
Darst; the fine Young People's Meeting of S'unday after- 
noon, presided over by I. H', Smith, of New Bern; the pres- 
ence of the Revs. Perry and Brown, visiting Clergy from 
Georgia; the fine enthusiasm of the delegates; and the pro- 
vision for a Young People's Conference to be held each 
year in July or August. The Convocation donated money 



to Haddock's Cross Roads and S't. Clement's Beaufort. 

The Woman's Auxiliary elected as President for this 
year Mrs. R. I. Johnson, of New Bern; Mrs. F. M. Powell, 
Secretary; Mrs. R. R. Brown, Treasurer; Mrs. J. F Holder, 
Vice-President. The Woman's Auxiliary donated $10 to 
Bishop D'elaney's Discretionary Fund and $30 to Sit. Clem- 
ent's, Beaufort. The Branches voted to work during the 
year for S't. Clement's, Beaufort, which is in a very dilapi- 
dated condition. 

Dr. Herritage was re-elected Dean, the Rev Mr. Thrown, 
Secretary, and Mr. William Dawson, Treasurer. 

Clergy present: Dean Herritage, the Revs. J. B. Th-own, 
J. F. Holder, S. H. Griffith, Augustus Hawkins. G. H Cau- 
tien. O. J. McLeod and R. I Johnson. Among laymen pres- 
ent were: W. M D'awson, I. H. Smith, H. W. Fisher, Mrs. 
Norwood, Mrs. Geyer, Mrs. H. W. Fisher, Miss Emma Poole, 
Miss Erma Mae Dawson, Mrs. J. B. Brown. Kelly Mills 
Mrs. Gray, and la.'Uiy others, including the splendid people 
of St Joseph's who entertained the Convocation in -in 
i.nMarpassed manner. The writer was h-^i)py v/ith li'^ ^\i''^ 
in the enjoyment of the hospitality of Mr. and Mrs. Herri- 
tage at the Rectory. The Motorcade to Camp Bragg and 
reception at night on Tuesday brought to an end a most 
profitable and enjoyable meeting. 

The next meeting will be with S't. Mary's, Belhaven, 
N. C. 



VARIED NEWS ITEMS OF INTEREST. 



The Bishop Payne Divinity School for the training of 
Negro clergy, which is not large, has included among its 
students this past year five men from various denomina- 
tions, at least one of whom, as a result of his studies, hopes 
to enter our ministry. 



Detroit has 88,000 Negroes. We have two Negro church- 
es there, St. Matthew's and St. Cyprian's, in which Bishop 
Page last year confirmed 75 persons. St. Augustine's Mis- 
sion is a third center, recently opened. St Matthew's has 
raised $20,000 toward a much needed parish house, the 
Diocese having promised $3, .000 for it. S't. Cyprian's is 
distressingly in need of adequate equipment. 



Among the 49 college students from Iowa in the congre- 
gation of St. John's Church, Ames, Iowa, 11 are from towns 
in which the Episcopal Church has no services. Besides 40 
or more students from 13 other states, among the commun- 
icants present there are 1 Canadian, 3 Chinese, 3 Greek. 
4 Armenian. 3 Russian (2 from Siberia) ; also 1 Bast Indian 
not a communicant. 



"What sort of luck is it," inquires the young woman 
who is religious education secretary in Montana, "when I 
take charge of a mission service on the thirteenth of the 
month and just as I start preaching from the lectern a black 
cat stalks up and sits in the puloit? T was not aspiring to 
be a second Maud Royden but I didn't expect the rector's 
cat to get a superiority complex." 



The president of Haiti, visiting this country, praises 
American friendship for Haiti but depores the fact that 
so many persons are inclined to think of his country as 
nothing but a land of voodoos. Church people certainly 
should not make this mistake, knowing Cas of f^ourse they 
do?) of our Bishop Carson and his two or three white 
workers, about twenty Haitian cler.gy, with from fifty to 
a hundred missions and preaching stations where crowds 
overflow the utterly inadequate shacks and sheds that serve 
a.f? churches. See General Church Program, pa.ge 79. 



16 



THE MISSION HEKAIJI 



jr=«e^-^ 



OWN A SUMMER HOME at CAROLINA BEACH 

Carolina Beach Is on the Main Land. A Beach that you can drive your Automobile to the Water's edge, 
A good hard road from Wilmington. A new modern hotel now under construction that will be completed 
for the season of 1926. Lots are sold on reasonable terms and as an investment they are ideal. Informa- 
tion gladly given. Call or write any authorized representative. 

CAROLINA BEACH CORPORATION 

OWNERS A3VD DEVELOPERS OF 

CAROLINA BEACH 



Offices at CAROLINA. BEACH, N. C. 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WINSTON- SALEM- N. C. 

W. W. Walsh. Vice-President; 



OFFICERS: — S. C. Ogburn, President; W. F. Schaffner, V^ice-President; 

E, P. Yates, Vice-President; E. D. Turner, g'ecretary-Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS: S. C. Ogburn, S. C. Clark, A. V. Nash, W. F. Shaffner, E. P. Yates, E. D. Turner,W. W. Walsh 
J. L. BECTON, C. E., Wilmington, N. C. Engineer in charge of development. 
REFERENCES: Any Bank or Mercantile Agency. 



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VOL. XL. 






No. 10. 





liS5inn 



v^^:^ r\\ 






\ 



%rf^!ra'tl)^ft)rarft^$ay c0mflKeu22:i7 q 




»;axB 



CONTENTS 




Clergy Meet at Wrightsville 
Home Coming at Old St. John's 
Swan Quarter Makes An Appeal 
Women Meet at Wrightsville 
Outline of Fall Work 
Mr. Cook Criticizes Grant 
Morgan's "Episcopalians." 





O 





mtabtt 1926 



O 



Published by the Diocese of East Carolina at Ay den, N. C, 




II ' ■ ■* 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



St. Mary^s School 

A JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Rev. WAKREN W. WAY, Rector. 



An Episcopal School for Girls. Four years High School and two 
years College Courses. Accred'ted. Special courses: Music, Art, 
Expression, Home Economics, Business. 

MODERN EQUIPMENT— 20-ACRE CAMPUS. 

Advent session opened Sept. 15, 1926. For catalogue address 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 




;R-%t#rpr, Inr. 



Altars,Pulpits,Lecterns,Fonts,Fabrics,Embroideries.||| 

Memorial Table ts, Stained Gla ss Windowsj 



56 WEST 8TH ST. NEW YORK. 



ALL POWER TO THEM! 



The men of St. John's Church, Fayetteville, met at a supper, the even- 
ing of the 28th of September, and organized a Men's Club — in conformity 
with the suggestion of the Executive Committee, and in order to be prepar- 
ed to take their full share of the work and responsibility in the Bishops' 
Crusade, which was heralded by one of the speakers as "The most moment- 
ous and significant event in the Episcopal Church since the first American 
Bishop was consecrated 142 years ago." 

The men were serious, fully realizing the magnitude and importance of 
the work they have voluntarily taken upon themselves. 

The officers were elected as followers: John H. Dewey, president; 
George McNeill, vice-president; Stephen G. Worth, secretary and treasurer. 
The following night the newly elected officers, with the Senior Warden, 
Mr. John R. Tolar, Jr., and the "Steering" committee, met with the rector, 
the Rev. Archer Boogher, and selected committees for the various phases of 
the work, giving the personnel of the committees most careful thought, the 
result being that every man in the Church will serve on that committee for 
which, by taste, temperament, and training, he is best qualified. 

Under the plan of organization, which had been carefully worked out in 
advance, this ideal condition was effected. Every possible need of the 
Church in this great evangelistic campaign is met by the functions of some 
committee, and every man in the Church is given a place where he can work 
to the best advantage of the cause and in accordance with his own inclina- 
tion and ability. 



NEWS OF GENERAL CHURCH. 



Three day^' haul of fish, or one week's pay in lieu thereof, is a pledge 
made for the Cathedral to be built in Victoria, B. .C. Commended to fisher- 
men along the Columbia and other Washington rivers, for the cathedrals to 
be erected in Seattle and Spokane. Commended also to Bishop Murray's 
attention, whose catch of "426 trout, 59 bass and three salmon in 17 fishing 
days," was duly noted by the New York Times. 



"Child labor is one of the troubles with this land," writes a woman in 
Liberia. "Trade will do a lot to develop a country but it will not stop child 
labor. Only Christian teaching will do that." 



Virginia 
Episcopal School 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 



Prepares boys at cost for Col- 
lege and University. Modern 
equipment. Healthy location in 
the mountains of Virginia. Cost 
moderate, made possible through 
generosity of founders. For cat- 
alouge apply to 

Rev Wm. G. Pendleton, D .D. 

Rector. 



Church Furnishings 



Gold, Silver and Brass 

Church and Chancel 
Furniture 

M'rite for Catalogrue for 
Episcopal Churches 

W. & E. SCHMIDT CO. ? 




308 Third Street, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



The Bank of Edenton 

SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 
Bank With us by Mail 

JULIAN WOOD, President. 
W. 0'. ELLIOTT, Vice-President 
D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 



Church Vestments 

Cassocks, Surplices, Stoles 

Embroideries, Clerical Suits, 
Silks, Cloths, Fringes. 

HATS, RABATS, COLLARS 

Cox Sons & Vining 

131-133 East 23rd St. NEW YORK 

The last word in designated special 
offerings seems to have been said by a 
donor to the Seaman's Church Insti- 
tute who asked that the contribution 
be used for stamped envelopes "to be 
given only to men who wish to write 
to their mothers." 




The Seamen's Church Institute says 
that the sailors alawys return all the 
books sent out in ships' libraries — ex- 
cept the Bible! 



The 




ission 



Herald 



Vol. XL. 



AYDEN, N. C, OCTOBER, 1926. 



No. 10. 



CLERGY CONFERENCE AT WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH 

MRS. McMillan makes address 



(By The REV. G. F. CAMERON.) 



Men's Clubs. 

The clergy of the Diocese and the officers of the wom- 
an's Auxiliary and Parochial society met in jo'nt session 
at the Girls' Friendly House at Wrightsville Beach at 2:30 
p. m., Wednesday, September 15th, with the Rev. Walter 
R. Noe, executive secretary presiding. Mr. George C. 
Royal, prominent layman from Goldsboro, spoke on Men's 
Clubs. He called our attention to the fact that the General 
Convention emphasized that every man ought to try to 
bring another into the Church, and urged that steps be 
taken to realize that aim; and presented a plan whereby 
the men of the Diocese could be organized into Men's 
Clubs, and showed that such clubs would be of great ser- 
vice in carrying out the work of the Church. The clubs 
will be organized by districts, and will later form the basis 
for a Diocesan organization for men. The following reso- 
lution, offered by the Rev. W. H. Mlton, D. D., was adopt- 
ed: 

"Resolved, That it is the sense of this Conference that 
some form of men's organization or club be effected in 
every parish and mission of the Diocese; and that each 
clergyman take immediate steps to form such organiza- 
tion, looking especially to the Commission on Evangelism 
and the Executive Council of the Diocese for plans." 

Our New President. 

At this juncture Mrs. Henry J. McMillan, president, and 
Mrs. S. P. Adams, vice-president, of the Woman's Auxil- 
iary, outlined their respective programs of work. We had 
heard Mrs. Adams before, and were not surprised when she 
inspired us with her zeal and power as a worker for the 
Lord. But it was the first time we ever heard our new 
president of the Woman's Auxiliary, Mrs. Henry J. Mc- 
Millan, and, if any one felt any uncertainty about her 
ability, it disappeared as soon as she began her address. 
Mrs. McMillan is a business woman, yet possesses all the 
charm and grace of womanhood; she has all the enthusiasm 
and dynamic force that has characterized the great Chris- 
t'an women, yet her mind is as clear as a bell, and her 
knowledge of and devotion to the cause of Christ inspired 
everybody. The women in East Carolina may feel justly 
proud of their new leader, who is gloriously fulfilling ev- 
ery prediction that she would be a worthy successor of 
Mrs. James G. Staton, who, because of her noble contribu- 
tion to the women's work in East Carolina, left a vacancy 
difficult to be filled. 

The Bishops' Crusade. 

At eight o'clock, Wednesday evening, Septepiber 15th, 
the Conference was resumed. The Rev. W. H. Milton, D. 
D., rector of St. James' Church, Wilmington, N. C, as the 
Bishop's representative, outlined the history and objective 
of the Bishops' Crusade, showing that it was the natural 
out-growth of the Nation-wide Campaign, that we must 



use sane evangelistic methods, if we are to properly grow; 
that for certain definite reasons we had neglected to use 
every method; and that it was our duty to instruct the peo- 
ple and make them feel their full responsibility in bringing 
souls into the Church. He spoke in terms of greatest ad- 
miration of the methods of the late Governor Hanby, who 
several years ago was the successful leading of the Flying 
Squadron that so vigorously championed the cause of Pro- 
hibition. It is the plan of the National Commission on 
Evangelism to begin preparatio-n with the first day of 
Advent, November 28th, 1926, and have its culmination in 
the Epiphany season. Certain exceptionally qualified 
preachers will be selected by the National Commission, and 
these will go out, two by two, as did the Apostles and 
Prophets of old, and preach in every Diocese in the Amer- 
ican Church. Lent is proposed as a period for intensive 
work in bringing souls into the Church. Dr. Milton stress- 
ed the fact that the object is not merely to fill the Church 
with numbers by telling men that they might as well be in 
the Church as out of it, but increase the scope of the 
Church's work by showing men their need of it. 

In the discussion which followed it was found that no 
specific action could be taken by the Conference, in regard 
to the Evangelistic Campaign, because the National Com- 
mission is not yet ready to present its final program for 
the Bishops' Crusade. However, the Conference made it- 
self known in several ways, and the clergy revealed that 
they are ready and willing to devote all their energy in 
making their contribution to the National Evangelistic 
Campaign when the time arrives. 

The folio-wing resolution was moved by the Rev. James 
E. W. Cook, of Greenville, and unanimously adopted: 

"Whereas, our beloved Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. 
Darst, D D., has opened his office in the National Cathed- 
ral, as chairman of the National Commission on Evangel- 
ism, at Washington, D. C; and 

Whereas, this important work will necessitate his ab- 
sence from the Diocese for several months. 

Therefore, be it Resolved, That we, the clergy of the 
Diocese, send to our Bishop this token of our renewed love 
and loyalty, assuring him of our prayers for the success of 
his work for the General Church, and of our determination 
to carry on the work of the Diocese, during his absence, to 
the best of our abilities." 

Last Day. 

At 9:30 a. m., Thursday, September 16th, the Conference 
met and discussed the program for fall work, which was 
ably presented by the Rev. Walter R. Noe, executive secre- 
tary. This program is of the usual high order, and is 
printed in full elsewhere. Mrs. J. B. Cranmer, of St. 
James' Parish, Wilmington, demonstrated the Parish Coun- 
cil in such a convicing manner that it was resolved to have 
one in every parish and mission in the Diocese The Con- 
ference adjourned with a most helpful and stimulating ad- 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



dress on "The Ministry of Today," by the Rev. Dr. Mil- 
ton. 

Conclusion. 

By and large, the Conference was a great success. The 
Clergy had a great time and enjoyed a real vacation. The 
addresses were thoughtful, devotional and inspiring, and 
we returned to our work with a fi-m determination to do 
better. 



HOME COMING AT OLD ST. JOHN'S, PITT CO., N. C. 



Dedication of the Polly Smith Memorial — Nearly One 
Thousand Present. 



WOMEN WORKERS MEET AT WRIGHTSVILLE 
BEACH. 



(By Mrs. Joseph N. Bynum, Secretary.) 

The fall conference of the diocesan officers of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary and Parochial Society, and chairmen of 
special committees, was held at the Holiday House of the 
GLrls' Friendly Society at Wrightsville Beach, September 
14th and 15th. The following were present: Mrs. Henry 
J. MacMillan, president; Mrs. Richard Williams and Mrs. 
S. P. Adams, first and second vice-president, respectively, 
Mrs. James Grist Staton, United Thank Offering treasurer. 
Miss Alice Adkins, supervisor of the "Service Program," 
Mrs. MacNeill and Miss Winslow, educational secretaries; 
Miss Harriet Nixon, secretary of the Church Periodical 
Club; Miss Mary Owen Sutherland, chairman of publicity; 
Mrs. J. B. Cranmer, secretary of the Field Department; 
Mrs. J. B. Gibble, provincial vice-president of the Order 
of the Daughters of the King; Mrs. G. F. Hill, chairman of 
the Corporate Gift, and Mrs. J. N. Bynum, secretary. 

The Rev. Walter R. Noe was celebrant at the eaily ser- 
vice of Holy Communion at the chapel in the Holiday 
House at 7:30 Tuesday morning. The first business ses- 
sion opened at nine o'clock on Tuesday, with prayer by 
Mr. Noe. The president, Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan, pre- 
sided at all sessions. The aim of the conference was to 
provide unity and coherence for the work of the diocese as 
a whole. The president read a suggested program, stress- 
ing the points of "The Message," and infusing into the 
work of the women of the diocese much of the spirit under- 
lying the Bishops' Crusade. This program was considered 
a great step forward in the work, and was approved as 
read. 

Reports of the first six months work were read by the 
various officers, and suggestions made and discussed for 
building up the weak spots. Wednesday morning was given 
to a discussion of the work of the Field Department and 
the Departments of Finance, Publicity, and Christian So- 
cial Service. The women's meeting closed at noon on 
Wednesday; but all were present at a joint conference with 
the clergy in- the afternoon to hear talks by Mr. George 
C. Royall on "Men's Clubs," Mrs. Adams on "The Mes- 
sage," and a presentation by Mrs. MacMillan of the sug- 
gested program for the women of the Diocese. Thursday 
morning a very interesting and convincing demonstration 
of the value of a Parish Council was given under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. J. B. Cranmer, assisted by the women and the 
clergy of the conference. All of those privileged to be 
present felt that the meeting had been well worth while, 
and had accomplished even more than had been hoped for, 
in promoting fellowship among the workers and arousing 
a fine enthusiasm for carrying out the high, definite aims 
set before it. 




The label on the Mission Herald shows date that your 
subscription expires. Has yours expired? If so, please 
send check to Mission Herald, Ayden, N. C, and save us 
the expense of mailing you statement. 



MARY NELSON SMITH. 

Old St. John's was in its glor^ on Sunday, September 
12th, 1926, when home coming day was celebrated and a 
beautiful memorial cross was dedicated to the memory of 
Mary Nelson Smith. Mr. George A. Johnson, of Ayden, 
made the address of welcome, the eloquence of which we 
shall not soon forget. The Rev. James E. W. Cook, rector 
of St. Paul's Greenville, gave the response, and, vidth the 
assistance of the present rector of St. John's, the Rev. 
G. F. Cameron, who read the ante-communion, celebrated 
the Holy Communion. The Rev. William E. Cox, rector of 
the Church of the Holy Comforter, and a product of St. 
John's community, preached an unusually appropriate ser- 
mon, choosing as his subject, "Stones for the Temple of 
Regenerated Humanity." 

Mrs. W. C. Askew, of Farmville, president of the Pitt 
county Get-To-gether-Group, presented the memorial, an 
altar cross, thirty inches high, which was given by the 
Woman's Auxiliaries of Pitt County, relations and admir- 
ers of Mary Nelson Smith. 

Mary Nelson Smith, affectionately known as Mrs. Polly 
Smith, born October 2, 1825, died February 18, 1907, was 
the leading figure in the Church and educational life of the 
community during the past generation. Her school, which 
was of the nature of a high school, gave the finishing 
touches to the school teachers of Pitt county. For many 
years it was the only school of its kind in the county. She 
was a pioneer in promoting higher education, and it is 
upon such pillars of strength that the great educational 
system of North Carolina is built. She taught during the 
days of Reconstruction, the period immediately following 
the close of the Civil War, a time when educators were few 
and education itself, often belittled. She saw that men 
and women could not attain the highest without a trained 
mind, and with great diligence and self-sacrifice she ap- 
plied herself to training the youth of her generation. She 
was the mother of one clergyman, the Rev. Claudius F. 
Smith, present rector of Christ Church, Big Stone Gap, 
Va., and the grand-mother of two, the Rev. William E. 
Cox, present rector of the Church of the Holy Comforter 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



who dedicated the memorial, and the Rev. Harvey A. Cox, 
present rector of Grace Church, Newport News, Va. 

A very pleasing part of the morning service was a vocal 
solo by Miss Bessie Brown, accompanied by Miss Eva 
Hodges, communicants of St. Paul's Church, Greenville, 
N. C. 

Then came the bountiful dinner, which was served picnic 
style by the congregation of St. John's Church. A table 
about one-hundred yards long was filled with all that could 
be desired. Delicious lemonade was also served. Though 
the crowd was large enough to fill the great church yard, 
there was enough food for everybody with some to spare. 

In the afternoon another meeting was held, and many 
informal talks were made, old associations revived, and 
many indulged in happy reminiscences. The Rev. Howard 
Alligood, a former rector, now of Washington, N. C, made 
a short talk and expressed his joy in being back among his 
beloved parishioners; the Rev. R. J. Lough, pastor of the 
Methodist Church of the community, spoke affectionately 
of his work and connection with the people of St. John's 
community; and the Rev. M. C. Prescott, pastor of the Free 
Will Baptists of the community, made an address on Com- 
munity Life, and emphasized the value of Christian unity. 

It was announced that St. John's Sunday School, which 
is the largest Episcopal School in this section, was com- 
posed of the following communions: Presbyterians 3; Dis- 
ciples 'Of Christ 16; Methodists 31; Episcopalians 41; and 
Free Will Baptists 73; making a total of 164. 

The success of the day was due largely to the spirit of 
co-operation of our friends and neighbors in the commun- 
ity, for it was really a community affair. We feel especial- 
ly indebted to the following: Messrs. Williams and H. C. 
Manning, of the Free Will Baptists, and Messrs. Pittman, 
W. G. Chapman, and Z. V. Murphy, of the Methodists. 

It is estimated that from eight hundred to one thousand 
people were present. They came from Raleigh, Farmville, 
Snow Hill, Gatesville, Greenville, New Bern, Kinston, 
Vanceboro, Polloksville, Winterville, Ayden, Grifton, Wil- 
mington, and many other places. 



AN OPPORTUNITY TO HELP BUILD A CHURCH. 



DONATES PICTURE OUTFIT. 



Cecil B. DeMille, of motion picture fame, has announced 
the gift of a complete moving picture equipment to the new 
Parish House of St. Peter's Church, Washington, N. C. 

Cecil DeMille is the grandson of William E. and a son 
of Henry C. DeMille. When the present church building 
of St. Peter's was erected, William E. DeMille, then a mer- 
chant of this city, was chairman of the building committee 
and gave much of his time and means to the work. In 
fact, he gave his life, as his death was brought on by ex- 
posure in a storm when he was looking after the construc- 
tion work. His funeral was the first service held in the 
building. It took place in September, 1873. 

In 1888, when the feeble church here was trying to buy 
a pipe organ, Henry C. DeMille, then living in New York 
City, made the largest single donation that was given for 
that purpose. In view of the association of the DeMille 
name with the old parish it is pleasing to its members that 
the parish house will contain this gift. Even more signi- 
ficant is the point that despite the fact that he has risen 
to the head of his profession, he is still interested in St. 
Peter's and Washington. 

Mr. DeMille's gift is of a most liberal nature and will 
help to make complete one of the units of the Parish House 
which, when finished, will fill a long-existing need in Wash- 
ington for a community building that will serve both 
Church and State. 




CALVARY MISSION, SWAN QUARTER, N. C. 

At a meeting of the Executive Council of the Diocese 
held on June 25th, the Bishop presented a letter from the 
minister in charge of Calvary Mission, Swan Quarter, in 
which it was stated that the congregation had done all it 
could towards the erection of a church building and that 
assistance would be needed to complete the work. After 
careful consideration the Bishop appointed a Committee, 
consisting of Revs. J. N. Bynum, W. R. Noe and 
Stephen Gardner to make the necessary investigation and 
to send out an appeal for funds. 

The committee motored to Swan Quarter on August 31st 
to look over the situation and advise ways and means of 
continuing the work on the building. The committee found 
that for a number of years our church people have wor- 
shipped in the Methodist church and that they feel now 
that they should have a church building of their own. 
They also feel that on account of the kindness of the other 
people of the community and in view of the fact that our 
services are attended by practically all the people, they 
should have a building that would take care of the needs 
of the community. Therefore the building which has been 
started, largely through faith, is the only kind of building 
which the church should erect in this promising field. 

The committee also found that approximately $2,500 
had been spent to date on the building which includes a 
few outstanding bills for material. It will take from 
$2,000 to $2,500 to enclose the building and to put it in 
condition to be used for services. 

We have only a small number of church people in Swan 
Quarter, and of these only two are men. For this reason 
the committee deems it advisable to place the situation be- 
fore the church people of our Diocese and also before the 
people of the church at large, feeling sure that there are 
many who would like to have a hand in finishing this work 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



so earnestly begun. All work on the building fronti now 
on will be directly under the committee appointed by the 
Executive Council. 

Contributions for this work should be sent to Miss Vir- 
ginia Brown, Swan Quarter, N. C, Treasurer of the fund. 
We are putting this report of the committee in our Dioces- 
an paper, the Mission Herald, and we are also placing in 
this paper a picture of the church building in its present 
state. A prompt and generous response to the appeal will 
enable the Committee to enclose the building and do other 
necessary work before the winter rains and bad weather. 



NOTES FROM ST PAUL'S PARISH, GREENVILLE, 
NORTH CAROLINA. 



(By MISS BESSIE HAYDN.) 

Although there has been no news from our Parish for 
the past few months, it does not mean that we have been 
sleeping under the summer heat. 

We are indeed glad that the Editorship of the MISSION 
HERALD has come to Pitt County. 

The Get-together Field Day at Green Wreath Park, on 
July 6th, was a success, although the attendance was not 
as large as usual. 

During the summer we have had no evening services, 
our church participating in the union services on the court 
house lawn. These have been better attended and far 
more enthusiastic than ever before. Our rector preached 
at two of them. 

Our Sunday School has been kept open all the summer 
with a good attendance, considering the large number of 
people away on vacations. The Hon. F. C. Harding, our 
beloved Bible Class teacher has taken a vacation. During 
his absence the following friends have kindly supplied: 
Dr. R. H. Wright, Prof. E. L. Henderson, R. C. Deal, Leon 
R. Meadows, H. E. Austin, all of E. C. T. C, Dr. Joseph 
Smith and Mayor D. M. Clark. Our sincere appreciation 
is extended to all of these kind friends. 

The Sunday afternoon services at Winterville, Stokes, 
and Robersonville, on the first, second and third Sundays 
of each month have been continued regularly with increas- 
ing interest shown. 

Our Rector made the graduating address at the E. C. T. 
C, taking as his subject, "My Report on Life." The same 
evening he addressed the Kiwanis Club on, "Kiwanis 
Ideal and Objectives." Both were fully reported in the 
local paper. 

Our membership has been increased by the transfers 
received for the following friends, whom we heartily wel- 
come: 

Mrs. Badham from St. George, S. C; Mr. and Mrs. G. 
M. Atwater from Farmville, N. C; Mr. and Mrs. R. C. 
Stokes, Jr., Lynchburg, Va. 

The Parish Council has held only one meeting during 
the summer, but will soon begin its fall work. This is a 
very good way for the entire church to keep up with the 
individual work of the various organizations. 

The church and the whole community were deeply pain- 
ed over the sudden death of Mrs. B. G. Albritton, and the 
untimely death of little Wade Wooten, the youngest son of 
Judge and Mrs. F. M. Wooten. The little fellow was 
drowned at Hill Crest. Our sincere sympathy is extended 
to both families. Mrs. Albritton was one of the finest and 
most faithful members of our communicants. May the 
blessed Saviour receive their souls in glory. 



PERSONAL ITEMS 



Mr. Thomas Wright, communicant of St. James' Church, 
Wilmington, N. C, and graduate of the University of the 
South, entered the Virginia Theological Seminary this fall. 

Miss Mary Hardin, of the Diocesan Office, Wilmington, 
has gone to Washington, D. C, to act as Bishop Darst's 
secretary. 

The Rev. W. R. Noe, executive secretary, conducted a 
mission at Lake Phelps, beginning September 22nd. 

The Rev. J. B. Brown and daughter, of Washington, have 
been sick, the latter with typhoid fever. 

The Rev. G F. Cameron, of Ayden, has been appointed 
official correspondent of the Diocese of East Carolina. 

The Rev. Harrell J. Lewis, who has been vicar at St. 
Mark's Church, Washington, D. C, during the summer, 
has returned to the Virginia Theological Seminary where 
he will finish his studies for the ministry next June. Mrs. 
Lewis accompanied him. 

The Rev. Joseph M. Taylor, who visited friends and re- 
latives in East Carolina during July and August, has re- 
turned to Miami, Fla., where he is vicar of the Church of 
the Holy Comforter. 

Cablegram has been received by Mrs. L. M. Disosway, 
announcing the safe arrival of her daughter, Dr. Lula 
Disosway, in Shanghai, on September 24th. 

The Rev. Howard Alligood, of Washington, N. C, at- 
tended the Hoine Coming celebration at Old St. John's, Pitt 
County, September 12th. 

The Rev. Alexander Miller has begun excavation for the 
construction of the new plant of St. Paul's Church, Wil- 
mington, N. C. 

The other day while passing through Goldsboro, the Rev. 
Wm. 0. Cone, the rector, showed us through St. Stephen's 
plant. Two very beautiful memorial windows have been 
recently installed; and the parish house has been extensive- 
ly remodeled, making it one of the most convenient and 
attractive in the Diocese. 

The September issue of the Spirit of Missions carries an 
interest. ng account of St. Paul's, Edenton, and the S. P. G., 
by the rector, the Rev. Robert B. Drane, D. D. 



MISSION CONDUCTED AT HOLY INNOCENTS', 
LENOIR COUNTY, BY MR. CAMERON. 



(Reported by Mrs. C. B. Jones.) 

The ten-day mission held by the Rev. G. F. Cameron, 
which did so much for Holy Innocents' spiritually was 
brought to a climax the 3rd Sunday in July when our own 
Rector, Mr. Cameron, at 9':30 a. m., had a Baptismal Ser- 
vice, Baptizing four children. At 10 a. m., we had Sunday 
School. At 11 o'clock Mr. Cameron presented four persons 
to Bishop Darst for Confirmation, after which we heard the 
kind of sermon our Bishop always gives to his people — 
most inspiring. 

Then the Holy Communion, Bishop Darst being assisted 
by Mr. Cameron and the Rev. W. R. Noe. 

At one o'clock we had a delightful picnic dinner on the 
grounds — after which we heard Mr. Noe, whom we all love 
and who has done so much for Holy Innocents' Church. 

To show our appreciation for these services we pledge 
ourselves still more loyally to the work of the Church. 



Date on label shows when your subscription expires. 
Help us avoid defic.t by sending in remittance promptly. 



Edenton Convocation meets in Greenville, Oct. 18, at 7:30 
p. m., and adjourns Oct. 20th, at noon. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



THE UNITED THANK OFFERING. 



MEMORIALS 



MRS KATE IRELAND. 

We, the members of the Woman's Auxiliary of All 
Saints' Chapel, New Bern, N. C, feel the great loss to our 
Society in the death of our member, Mrs. Kate Ireland, on 
May 31st, 1926. 

We do hereby place on record our sorrow at the loss 
of this faithful member and friend. Mrs. Ireland was a 
faithful and devoted wife and mother, always striving to 
be a constant follower of the living Christ. Her sunny and 
cheerful disposition, even in the face of lingering illness, 
her willingness to help in all charitable and Christian 
work, ever portrayed her loving Christian character, and 
truly left its imprint on those with whom she came in 
contact. Of her indeed may be said, "I've fought a good 
fight." 

Resolved, That this memorial be spread upon the pages 
of our minutes, and that a copy be sent to the family, and 
to the Mission Herald. 

MRS. LIZZIE LANE, 
MRS. WILLIAM PARRIS, 
MISS RUTH MEDFORD. 



M'RS. BEN R. KING. 

Circle No. 2, of St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, of 
Goldsboro, N. C, wishes to pay tribute to one of its most 
active anl loyal members, Mrs. Ben R. King. 

On September 11, 1926, God in His most infinite love 
and wisdom saw fit to call her unto Himself and she gently 
fell asleep. 

For thirty years she has been a faithful and efficient 
worker in this Parish; and during that time has held the 
office of President, Secretary and Treasurer of the Church 
Guild. In her modest and unassuming way she was an 
ever-ready co-worker with our heavenly Father in the es- 
tablishment of His kingdom on earth. 
Therefore, be it Resolved: 

First: That we bow in humble submission to Him who 
giveth and taketh away. 

Second: That we extend to her family, and the many 
who loved her, our deepest sympathy. 

Third: That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
family and Mission Herald. 

MRS. Z. M. L. JEFFREYS. 
MRS. CAROLINA R. PORTER, 
MRS. W. P. LYNCH, 
LUCY L. MILLER. 



CHURCH KALENDAR OCTOBEiR-NOVEMBER, 1926. 



"O live ye by the Kalendar, 
And with the good ye dwell; 
The Spirit that came down on them. 
Will Lighten you as well." — Bishop Coxe. 
Oct. 10— 19th Sunday after Trinity (Green) 

17 — 20th Sunday after Trinity (Green, Red for eve.) 
18— S. Luke, Evangelist (Red) 

24— 21st Sunday after Trinity (Green) 

28— SS. Simon and Jude (Red) 

31— 22nd Sunday after Trinity 

(Green. White for eve.) 

Nov. 1— All Saints' Day (White) 

7— 23rd Sunday after Trinity (Green) 



Farmville, Roxobel and Faison Reach Goal. 



Williamston, N. C, St. Matthew's Day, 1926. 
To the Women of East Carolina: 

While several days have been suggested as the one 
which we might name for the collection of the United 
Thank Offering in 1926, the majority expressed a desire 
for St. Luke's Day, October 18th, therefore we shall call 
that our official fall date. St. Luke wrote so beautifully 
of women and their work that the day seems most fitting 
to be observed by us. Don't you think so ? 

Please consult your Rector about the service. Perhaps 
he will have a celebration of the Holy Communion and 
make an address. Holy Offerings, rich and rare is, as you 
know, our United Thank Offering hymn and is always 
sung at the Triennial Presentation Service. Numbered 
478 in the o*ld Hymnal and 504 in the new. Please ask the 
choir to use it at this fall service. 

Again we must bear in mind that our emphasis is on 
having every woman and girl over 18 using the Prayer for 
the United Thank Offering and owning a Little Blue Box. 
From those boxes the offering should be taken and placed 
in the blue envelope on which the giver's name has been 
written. Thus we can record the number of givers. Three 
places reported an offering from every woman for the 
spring service — Farmville, Roxobel and Faison. How shall 
our record read after the fall service ? 

Of course, any Parish and Mission is at liberty to use a 
day other than St. Luke's. The Sunday before will doubt- 
less be used by some. Local conditions must decide this 
question. A Rector with several points to serve can't 
give all the same day, although we might co-operate by 
taking different hours. 

Two pageants might help now, The Box Convention and 
In and Out of the Little Blue Box. Several get-together 
meetings plan to use one this fall. The women assembled 
at Convocation may use one. 

After each place has had these two pageants there are 
two others which may be given to arouse interest. 

Your Diocesan United Thank Offering treasurer has a 
supply of Little Blue Boxes, blue envelopes, pageants, 
leaflets and prayer cards, so please send in calls for them. 
It is a privilege to serve the women of East Carolina. 
Yours faithfully, 
FANNIE CHASE STATON, 
Treasurer United Thank Offering. 



AN APPRECIATION. 



Whereas, Miss Alice Adkins of Southport, N. C, has 
recently been appointed Diocesan Supervisor of the Ser- 
vice Program of Church Schools of the Diocese of East 
Carolina; and. 

Whereas, the Woman's Auxiliary of St. Philip's Parish, 
SouthpoTt, N. C, is highly appreciative and grateful for 
this recognition and believes Miss Adkins to be thoroughly 
competent and qualified to discharge the duties of this im- 
portant office; 

Now, therefore, be it Resolved, by the Woman's Auxil- 
iary of St. Philip's Parish, Southport, N. C, that we ex- 
press our sincere appreciation for this recognition at the 
hands of the Church authorities, and that a copy of this 
resolution be sent to the Executive Secretary, the Rev. 
Mr. Noe, and to the Mission Herald for publication. 
EULA CAR DAVIS, President. 
MAMIE P. MESSICK, Secretary. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



E\tt iHtsston Heralb 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly at 

AYDEN, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance. 

EDITORIAL STAFF: 

Editor: 

REV. GEORGE F. CAMERON, B.A., B.D. 

Contributing Editors: 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D.D. 
REV. R. B. DRANE, D.D. 
REV. JAMES E. W. COOK, 
MRS. HENRY J. McMILLAN. 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, Ay- 
den, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their addresses, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Manager, 
giving when necessary, both the old and new addresses. 

Subscribers wishing to discontinue their subscriptions 
should so notify the Manager, as an absence of such notifi- 
cation is considered a continuance of the subscription. 

All articles for publication should reach the Business 
Manager by the 25th of the month. New subscriptions, 
renewals, requests for change of address and copy for ad- 
vertisements should be sent to 

REV. GEORGE F. CAMERON, 

Ayden, N. C. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE! 

Beginning with this month the Mission Herald vnll be 
mailed out by machine. If you should fail to receive your 
copy, notify us and we will send you another. 

Watch the label! It shows the month and year that your 
subscription expires. Many subscribers are already sev- 
eral year's in arrears. Has your subscription expired? If 
so, please remit promptly. B|y so do.ng you will be a 
powerful help to us. 

REV. G. F. CAMERON, Business Manager. 



A VITAL QUESTION. 

We ask the question here, "Why is it that the men of the 
Church, as a rule, do not show the same high quality of 
devotion to the Lord that the women do?" Some reply 
that business keeps men from dedicating themselves to the 
cause of Christ. To that statement, St. Paul would make 
this counter-reply: "Yes, and those who are of the earth 
are earthy." And, finally, we ought tO' remember that the 
Kingdom will never submit to conj.ormity with the earth, 
but that the earth must confrom to the Kingdom. When 
men see and understand th.s truth, then will they take 
more interest in the Master's vineyard. "The sceptre of 
the Kingdom is the sceptre of righteousness." The com- 
bined force of all the ages is not sufficient to controvert 
that truth. G. F. C. 



ATTENTION: CHURCH TREASURERS. 

Our Diocesan treasure:, in answer to a request, makes 
the following statement: "The treasury is not only empty. 



but our account at the bank is over-drawn; and I am daily 
in receipt of requests to make the deficit good. I hope 
our parishes will catch up now, that the fall season has 
come. Have had to borrow $5,500 to get through the 
summer." If you are a parish treasurer, or a vestryman, 
consider this statement seriously, and see that your parish 
pays, at the earliest possible moment, all its quota. If 
you are a communicant, make arrangements to pay to your 
parish treasurer your pledge for 1926, that he may lighten 
the load of our Diocesan treasurer. If these steps are 
taken now, we can wind up our accounts for the year 1926 
without all the. unnecessary anxiety that comes upon the 
Church about the last day of the year. The way to finish 
on time is to begin on time. G. F. C. 



THE FRAGRANCE OF WORK. 

There is such a fact as the sweet fragrance of flowers, 
and that is why we always have pleasant associations upon 
the sight of them. A pressed flower in the book reminds 
us of precious experiences and joyful contacts. Work also 
has its fragrance, which has power to produce imagina- 
tion and write indelibly associations upon the memory. 
We had that experience at St. Paul's Mission, Vanceboro, 
N. C, where we went one Sunday afternoon in August to 
supply for Mr. Madara of Christ Church, New Bern. As 
we approached the church we felt lumber crack under our 
feet, for the interior of the church was in process of re- 
pair; when we went into the vestry room, we found the 
odor of cleanliness and order, and the atmosphere was full 
of it; when we went into the chancel, we found the odor 
of fresh paint and varnish, and the church was full of 
such; and, after the service, as we greeted the people, we 
enjoyed the odor of a dustless and well-kept church. Upon 
leaving we wondered if our sermon had had as good effect 
upon the congregation as the fragrance of their work had 
upon us. We knew, because of the fragrance of their 
labors, that we had been in a clean, orderly, self-respecting 
church, whose people believed that the Grace of God was 
like unto the fragrance of work. Wherever and whenever 
we hear the Church in Vanceboro mentioned, we shall re- 
member our delightful experience there. G. F. C. 



LEAPING FISH. 

When men are out in a boat fishing, there may be — to 
speak conveniently — two classifications, the man-classifica- 
tion and the fish-classification. Everything runs along 
smoothly until these two classifications begin to over-lap. 
If fish jump into the boat from one side, remain a few 
minutes, and then jump out from the other side, there is no 
serious cause for alarm. But if the fish jump into the boat 
fast enough and remain, grave concern is felt for the 
safety of life — the two classifications are over -lapping too 
promiscuously. 

So it is with all classifications. The Grave-Diggers, who 
have a finely developed ego and feel themselves above re- 
proach because men have praised their perfect work, do 
not like to mix their interests w.th those of the Potato- 
Diggers, who cannot present worthy credentials. That is 
why you can scare a Protestant to death by telling him 
that the Roman Catholic is encroaching upon his territory. 
He feels that his whiter-than-snow character may become 
besmirched with the imagined evils of his unknown en- 
croacher. That is the explanation, in part, of the indiffer- 
ence of some church people. Fear arises when classifica- 
tions are over-lapping, contentment is receiving a jar, 
beaten paths are becoming obstructed, and social barriers 
are seen to totter. All approaching phenomeira that ap- 
pear to have the possibility of making classifications over- 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



lap are deliberately avoided and shunned. There is an 
aspect, based upon instinct, to be considered here. It 
looks like it might be the instinct of fear that fights for 
preservation, and manifests itself in the form of COOL- 
NESS AND INDIFFERENCE towards others. If it is 
based upon instinct, it will take ages to correct the decay- 
that some feel to exist in the Protestant Episcopal Church 
in America. 

We believe that a great deal of the denial and uncer- 
tainties about the work of evangelizing the Church is due 
to the fear that over-lapping of classifications is the one 
and only object desired, or filling the Church with mere 
numbers. However, the task of completely evangelizing 
the Church, and we ought especially to think of East 
Carolina right now, must be more comprehensive than 
that. St. Paul says that we have not the fruits of the 
Spirit until we have Love, Joy, Peace, Longsuffering, Gen- 
tleness, Goodness, Faith, Meekness and Temperance. That 
being true, there is abundant ground for improvement here 
at home. Let us not be afraid that leaping fish will sink 
the boat. If we obtain the fruits of the Spirit we need 
not worry about the boat sinking. G. F. C. 



BOXES OF GOOD-WILL 

One of the most delightful parts of our fall work is the 
packing of our Christmas boxes. This year some of the 
boxes go to Liberia, one of the finest of our Mission Fields, 
because it presents one of the greatest challenges, others 
go to our Home Mission Fields, and still others go to the 
Seamen's Institute in Philadelphia and New York. 

Of course, the gifts will be useful, more so than many 
of us realize. We shall never forget the beautifully knitt- 
ed sweater of new wool that some unknown friend sent to 
us through the Red Cross during the World War. It 
gladdened our hearts and filled us with joy. It gladdened 
our hearts because it kept us warm; it filled us with joy 
because it was a sign of good-will. From such experience 
we deduce that our Christmas boxes ought to contain the 
best that we can possibly procure. When we send a gift 
we send a substitution for ourselves. If we send a fine 
gift, it proves that we are putting our best selves into the 
act. If we send an indifi"erent gift, it shows that we are 
working half-heartedly. Let's put our best into the Christ- 
mas boxes and prove to the heathen in Liberia that Chris- 
tian hearts are hearts of good-will, always remembering 
that our gifts represent us as we really are. — G. F. C. 



HEARTS MADE GLAD AT HOME COMING. 



(By MRS. WALTER F. HARDING.) 

(The editor regrets that this interesting article had to 
be abbreviated on account of lack of space). 

Oh! it was a great day, the Home Coming at Old St. 
John's, Pitt County, Sunday, September 12th, 1926. Where 
in other years they hitched up Nell and Jim to the carriage 
or wagon, Sunday they backed out the Cadillac or the old 
Ford. Home-coming ma, who had married out of the 
neighborhood, brought pa and the children; and, in many 
cases they were not children at all, but grown-ups. The 
grand-children of the church came, bringing their wives 
and little fellows. 

They came by couples, by families, and by clans. Some 
had not been back for twenty-five or thirty years. One wo- 
man, a former teacher, was looking around at the young 
folks, trying to decide which was Sam or Jim; and pres- 
ently gray-haired women and men began claiming her as 
their teacher. Then she realized that some water had run 



over the mill since she had been there, and that one of her 
favorite pupils had got so big that she could not reach 
around him when she tried to hug him. There were so 
many there it reminded us of the time when a first visit 
from a new bride was due and everybody came out to see, 
or a wedding, or one of our girls had graduated and was 
expected at church and would wear her graduating dress. 
(Graduates were rare in those days.) 

A good many arrived in time for Sunday School at 9:45 
a. m. The Rev. Wm. Cox, of Richmond, gave a short talk 
to the Sunday School, paying a wonderful tribute to those 
men and women, now, alas no more with us, who had been 
the pattern and were helping to shape his life. Mr. Geo. 
A. Johnson, who welcomed the visitors back home, had 
long dreamed of the home coming day, and its realization 
brought forth from him a gem of oratory as he bade them 
welcome to the old home. As in the old days we had 
Communion, and home-comers knelt there by the side of 
old friends and neighbors, and to each this lent an added 
significance. 

After dinner and a short social period, we gathered in 
the church where we heard, first, short addresses by the 
ministers present, and then came a few short talks. Not 
much was said for tears were stinging the eyes; and there 
were so many missing among the ranks, those who had 
passed on to another life. We called for our old teacher 
(she is not old; but what else can we say?), Miss Nannie, 
known now as Mrs. T. W. Costen. She had us, the pupils 
of her Bible class to rise, and repeat the verses that she 
had taught us to say: "Remember thy Creator. . . . 
in thy youth. . . ." Most of us, however young our 
hearts, were far from youth. She did not talk long, but 
expressed her joy to be back among people w.th whom 
she had spent four years which had lived in her memory. 
We were happy to be together again, even to the point of 
tears. Other speakers made informal talks, stressing 
what had meant much to the community. 

But we were so happy! It meant so much to have our 
hearts renewed and our spirits refreshed. The old-time 
organist was there in her place; the choir, every one in the 
congregation, and even those in the vestibule sang. 

Some of our notables didn't get there. We were looking 
for a bank president, a college professor, a rich automobile 
dealer, a rich druggist, a former college president, and a 
high school principal. There was another preacher that 
didn't come, and Texas sent no representative. But we 
had former ministers and their fam.lies, lawyers, doctors, 
merchants and their families. And we had the Rev. George 
F. Cameron, our present rector, going in and out, entirely 
forgetting himself in looking after others. 

Well, like the old maid, who was kissed by force, we like 
to talk about it and shall for a long time. 



EDENTON CONVOCATION. 



The Edenton Convocation meets at St. Paul's Church, 
Greenville, N. C, from 7:30 p. m., Monday, October 18th, 
until noon, Wednesday, October 20th, 1926. 

Every parish and mission in the Edenton Convocation is 
supposed to send delegates to this meeting, which will 
consider matters of most vital interest to the Church's life. 
Names of all delegates should be sent to the Rev. James 
E. W. Cook, Greenville, N. C, at the earliest possible 
moment. Be easy on the Hospitality Committee and let 
them know you are coming, stating the exact hour that 
you will arrive. Upon arriving in Greenville go to the 
Church and register, so that the committee can properly 
assign you. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



At this writing we cannot give a mature program. 
However, the following have been invited to preach, or 
lead in discussions and conferences: the Rev. G. F. Cam- 
eron will preach at the opening service at 7:30 p. m., Mon- 
day, October 18th; Dr. W. H. Dixon, Superintendent Cas- 
well Training School, has been invited to speak on the 
subject of "Sterilization and Segregation of Mental Defec- 
tives and Strict Enforcement of Marriage Laws," at 3.00 
p. m., Tuesday, October 19th; the Rev. W. R. Noe, execu- 
tive secretary, will discuss our fall work; the Rev. W. H. 
Milton, D. D., will lead conferences; and the Rev. G. F. 
Hill, the Rev. C. E. Williams, the Re.'. C 0. Pardo, the Rev. 
James E. W. Cook, the Rev. G. W. Lay, D. C. L., have been 
invited to lead other discussions or conferences. 

The following will make up program for the Woman's 
Auxiliary: Mrs. Henry J. McMillan, Mrs. J. B. Cranmer, 
Mrs. S. P. Adams, Miss Mae Wood Winslow, Mrs. Bowers, 
and Mrs. J. G. Staton. 

Completed program will be read at the beginning of the 
Convocation. We are trying to make this Convocation 
worth while. Come and help us! 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE AND TRAINING INSTITU- 
TION, CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Dedication of New Buildings. 

The formal dedication of the Baker Cottage for boys 
and the Christ Church Cottage for girls, was held oji Tues- 
day afternoon, September 7th, at five o'clock. Mrs. Ashby 
Lee Baker and her two sons, Ashby Lee, Jr., and Julian 
Tucker, who gave the Baker Cottage for boys, the 
Rev. Milton A. Barber, rector of Christ Church, Raleigh, 
with a number of his parishioners and members of St. 
Agnes' Guild of Christ Church, who gave the Christ Church 
Cottage for girls, came from Raleigh for the occasion. 

The services of dedication and unveiling of tablets were 
conducted by the Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Penick, D. D. Bishop 
Coadjutor of the diocese. The vested choir of the Orphan- 
age led by the crucifer and flag-bearer, followed by the 
Bishop, the Rev. Milton A. Barber and the Rev. W. H. 
Wheeler, marched to the Christ Church Cottage, where 
with appropriate prayers the handsome bronze tablet was 
unveiled by Miss Sarah Tucker Williamson. This tablet 
bore the inscription: 

CHRIST CHURCH COTTAGE. 

This cottage was erected by 

St. Agnes' Guild 

and other members of Christ Church, 

Raleigh, N. C. 

"And a little child shall lead them." 

1925 A. D. 

Then all present proceeded to the Baker Cottage, led by 

the choir singing the hymn, "All things are Thine." After 

prayers of consecration the tablet was unveiled by Mrs. 

Baker's two sons, Ashby Lee and Julian Tucker Baker. 

This tablet was inscribed as follows: 

1925. 

In gratitude to God 

and in loving memory of 

Ashby Lee Baker 

1862—1921 

"To live in hearts we leave behind 

is not to die." 

This building is the gift of his wife and two sons 

Minnie Tucker Baker 

Ashby Lee Baker, Julian Tucker Baker, 



Following the unveiling of the two tablets, Bishop Pen- 
ick formerly accepted the two cottages on behalf of the 
Board of Managers, expressing grateful appreciation of 
the splendid contribution. The Bishop then introduced the 
Rev. Milton A. Barber, who told in detail how the mem- 
bers of his parish had labored unceasingly to make pos- 
sible the erection of the Christ Church Cottage, and of Mrs. 
Baker's generous contribution of the entire amount neces- 
sary for the boys' cottage. 

Ice cream and cake were then served to the children and 
guests, who included many Charlotte Episcopalians and 
friends of the Orphanage. 

Opening of Administration Building. 

The Building Committee met in the new administration 
building Thursday afternoon, September 23rd, and after a 
careful inspection of same, the building was formally ac- 
cepted by the committee. The completion of this splendid 
building marks an epoch in the life of the Orphanage. It 
contains a model kindergarten room, a library and reading 
room, an office. Boy Scout room. Girl Reserve Club room, 
a sewing and general storage room, an assembly hall and 
gymnasium and shower baths for boys and girls. 

The kindergarten room has been in use for two weeks 
and is most attractive. At last Miss Nail, our very cap- 
able and efficient kindergartner, has adequate space and 
facilities with which to carry on her valuable work. There 
are thirty-nine little tots in her kindergarten and primary 
school. 

The new equipment needed for this work is being given 
by the Church Service League of St. Peter's Church, Char- 
lotte. 

We have never had before any gym or assembly hall or 
library. We shall need every bit of new equipment neces- 
sary to- outfit these departments. Perhaps some of our 
many generous friends may feel moved to help us toward 
securing this equipment. The list of gymnasium equip- 
ment carefully compiled by the recreational director, ap- 
proved by the Executive Committee and also approved by 
the physical director of the Charlotte Y. M. C. A. totals 
$904.75. The estimate for equipping the library is $766.50; 
for folding chairs for the assembly hall, $232.50. 

Large Number in City Schools. 

There are sixty-six children going out to the city schools 
this year, fifteen in the high schools and fifty-one in the 
grammar grades. This is the largest number we have ever 
sent. The boys and girls seem happy to be back at school 
and are studying hard to make it a worthwhile year. They 
are all eager to justify the high regard in which their 
teachers hold them. 

i^ine Beginning of Educational Loan Fund. 

A gift of $400.00, half of which is from Mrs. Porter 
Stedman and the other half from her sister. Miss Mary 
Lybrook, both members of St. Paul's, Winston-Salem, has 
recently been received. The desire of the two donors is 
that this money be used to help in the higher education of 
any of the Orphanage children desiring such training and 
whom the Orphanage authorities feel should be encouraged 
by such assistance, or in the judgment of the orphanage 
authorities it may be used to help the children establish 
themselves after leaving the institution. This generous 
gift of Mrs. Stedman and Miss Lybrook brought much re- 
joicing, as there is quite often need for just such a fund. 
It is earnestly hoped that others may follow their generous 
example, 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



11 



Cash Contributions Received From Diocese East Carolina 
From August 23 to September 24, 1926. 

Wilmington, Miss Wilhelmina Harlow $ 300 

Merry Hill, E. S. Askew 100.00 

Merry Hill, Emily, Richard and Whitmell Smith- 
wick 1.00 

Contributions in Kind. 
New Bern, All Saints' W. A. — Six bloomer dresses. 

Lio'ns Give Enjoyable Picnic. 

On the day before school opened, the Lions Club treated 
the children to an afternoon picnic at Lakewood Park. The 
children swung, rode the merry-go-round, watched the ani- 
mals and went boat Tiding to their hearts' content. Some 
of them also went swimming in the pool. The Lions serv- 
ed such an abundance of refreshments as the boys and girls 
had never seen. Bananas, lemonade and ice cream sand- 
vdches were offered them until they could eat no more. 
Some of the children declared that it was the first time 
they had ever gotten full of ice cream. They all voted it 
a "peach of a time." 

We wrote expressing to the Lions our appreciation of 
their kindness, and the superintendent received from the 
chairman of the committee a reply containing the follow- 
ing paragraph: 

"Your institution as well as the other orphanages are to 
be congratulated and commended for the wonderful train- 
ing the children in your institutions are getting. In my 
experience I have never been thrown vdth children who 
were better behaved and more considerate of others." 



BISHOP PENICK'S SCHEDULE. 



St. Paul's Greenville, N. C, Rev. James E. W. Cook, rec- 
tor, Sunday, October 24th, 11:00 A. M. 

St. John's Pitt County, Rev. George F. Cameron, rector, 
Sunday, October 24th, aitemoon or night. 

St. Thomas', Bath, Rev. J. N. Bynum, rector, Monday, 
October 25th, 7:30 P. M. 

St. Matthew's Yeatesville, Rev. J. N. Bynum, minister- 
in-charge, Tuesday, October 26th, 7:30 P. M. 

Holy Cross, Aurora, Rev. T. N. Brincefield, rector, Wed- 
nesday, October 27th, 7:30 P. M. 

St. Thomas', Windsor, Rev. A. J. Mackie, rector, Thurs- 
day, October 28th, 7:30 P. M. 

Holy Innocents', Avoca, Rev. A. J. Mackie, rector, Fri- 
day, October 29th, afternoon. 

Grace, Woodville, Rev. A. J. Mackie, rector, Friday, Oc- 
tober 29th. 7:30 P. M. 



EAST AND WEST MEET. 



Perhaps not as Mr. Kipling meant it. But it happens. 
Maine and Montana; Long Island and Los Angeles; Penn- 
sylvania and the Philippines; Jersey and Japan; Connecti- 
cut and China; York State and Yukon; every little while 
they may be found together in the office of the Church 
Building Fund. And why not? According to the doctrine 
which makes the Church Missions House a necessity, they 
are all in the family, and they find more than one common 
ground for meeting. 

From May to September, the Building Fund paid out 
ten Loans and twenty Gifts, $49,300 of one and $18,000 of 
the other, to twenty-six Dioceses and Missionary Dis- 
tricts. In the same period it promised two other Loans 
amounting to $19,500, ten other Gifts in the sum of $2,650, 
and one Grant of $1,000, adding thus seven to the number 
of Dioceses and Districts aided. The farthest East, as we 



call it, was Vermont, and farthest West, China and Japan. 
In all eighteen Churches, fifteen Rectories and fourteen 
Parish Houses, forty-seven buildings, were secured to the 
Church all round the world, East and West, in thirty-three 
Dioceses and Districts. 

"And ever the twain shall meet," for there is no East 
and West with the Commission. It is the Church. Build- 
ing Fund Sunday is November 14th. The Church's co-op- 
eration expressed in the offerings of Parishes and Mis- 
sions on that or some nearby Sunday, is needed for the 
increase of the Fund and the fuller realization of its pur- 
pose, — the strengthening and extension of the Kingdom in 
which East and West are one. 



CHANGE IN NOMENCLATURE. 



To the Parish Supervisors of the Service Program of the 

Church School: 

May I draw your attention to: 

CHANGE IN NOMENCLATURE. 

The Church School Service League is no longer a sepa- 
rate organization. I call your attention tO' "The Service 
Program of the Church School." This is in order that 
there may be a uniform title from the Parish through the 
Dioceses and Provinces to the General Church. 

To guide this "Sei'vlce," there will be a definite group of 
leaders needed for diocese and parish. 

In the Diocese, such a group will be called "The Service 
Program Committee"; its cha rman will be called "The 
Diocesan Supervisor of the Service Program.'" 

On this committee will be 

1. Christmas Box Secretary. 

2. Birthday Thank Offering Secretary. 

3. A Lenten Offering Secretary. 

4. A Little Helpers Offering Secretary. 
Similarly, each Parish will have a Committee on Service 

Program, with a Supervisor as chairman, though not neces- 
sary to have so many people as compose the Diocesan Com- 
mittee. That is a local matter. 

Reasons for the change, is simply in order to emphasize 
still further the fact that membership in a Christian 
Church School is in itself a sufficient reason for render- 
ing service (through works and gii'ts) to Christ throiigh 
one's neighbors. 

A child need not feel that he must join some other organ- 
ization for service, in addition to his Church School. 

MRS. W. H. von EBERSTEIN. 



A MOST HELPFUL CUSTOM. 



It may not be generally known that Christ Church, New 
Bern, N. C, is open every day for prayer and meditation. 
It does seem to be worthwhile to open the doors every 
morning, and make available, the great privilege of a 
quiet period with God. A few minutes spent in the mellow 
light of this Church each day will help to quiet one's mind, 
and to bring the soul closer to God. Make use of this op- 
portunity; the door is open to you. 



AN OPPORTUNITY TO HELP THE DIOCESE. 



The first check for $25.00 sent us for the purpose, will 
be used to bind permanently in book form, the past Issues 
of The Mission Herald. If any other checks are received 
for this object, the money will be converted into a fund, 
the interest of which will be used to bind future issues of 
our paper. This is a good opportunity for some one inter- 
ested to help preserve the records of the Diocese. Send 
check to Mission Herald, Ayden, N. C. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



THE EPISCOPALIANS. 



A Criticism of Mr. Grant Mcrgan's Article in tlie October 
Issue of The American Mercury. 



(By the REV. JAMES E. W. COOK.) 

Robert Burns, in his poem "To a Mouse," exclaims, 
"0 wad some power the giftie gie us 
To see ourselves as ithers see us," 
and asserts that such a gift would free us from vain and 
silly self-opinions. I used to think this was universally 
true, until I read the article on "The Episcopalians" men- 
tioned above. Now I realize that Burns' statement is only 
true when the "ithers" really "see." If their eyes are 
defective, causing astigmatism, if they suffer from myopia, 
or from presbyopia, the expression of what they see may 
only awaken pity for them instead of correcting the es- 
timate we place on ourselves. 

If Mr. Grant Morgan tried to present a picture of our 
great and historic Church he has only succeeded in pro- 
ducing a caricature. The likeness is as true as the gro- 
tesque iigures shown in a concave or a convex mirror. 

He says, "One of the first anomalies to strike the outsid- 
er is the disproportionate influence exercised by what is 
one of the smallest of sects," and contrasts our communi- 
cant list with "the ambitious claims of the Cathedral of 
St. John the Divine to be the cathedral of all the people of 
New York"; and "he is still more awed at the thought of 
the programme of the Episcopal Cathedral at Washing- 
ton, which is to be, according to the campaign literature, 
the national cathedral, the Westminister Abbey of These 
United States. Again there are the pompous bulls of the 
Bishops displayed on the front pages of the metropolitan 
dailies so as to make the utterances of the poor Pope look 
insignificant by comparison." These features he stigma- 
tizes as "propagada." He gives the ratio of our com- 
municants to population as being in New York one in 
seventy; in Chicago, less than one in a hundred; "and in 
Kansas they number only one-half of one per cent of the 
state population." 

We frankly admit that the total number of communi- 
cants in our Church is not as large as it ought to be. 
We were the first on the field, but have been out-distanced. 
There are good historic reasons for the slowness of our 
growth in Colonial days. For example, the reluctance of 
the mother Church of England to grant us bishops, and 
the popular revulsion to anything that savored of the Old 
Country. But, if the "influence" of the Episcopal Church 
is "disproportionate" to its numbers, there must be a rea- 
son. May it not be because the chasteness of its service 
attracts men of the brainiest kind and of the strongest 
personality ? 

"To make the thing still more vivid, the Episcopalians 
number one-eighth the count of the despised Methodist." 
"Despised!" By whom? Certainly not by Episcopalians. 
The mother does not despise her child because she leaves 
home and sets up bouse for herself. Mr. Grant Morgan's 
whole essay is spoilt because it is tinctured with prejudice 
and cowardly innuendo. 

Another example of this: in speaking of th" r'hurch's 
attitude on prohibition, he says, "Most Ep ctors 

have been known to enjoy a drink, and r t has 

never been the Episcopal contention that dr.r ' - evil in 

itself." As a matter of fact, the oldest existing Sobriety 
Society is the Church of England Temperance Society; and 
the statement of Mr. Grant Morgan is proved false by the 
lives of hundreds of our clergy. 

Yet another example: referring to the shortage of 



clergymen and the fact that ministers of other denomina- 
tions frequently join our Church, he writes, "Incidentally, 
it may be mentioned that the majority of converts from 
the other churches come over hungry for ritual and other 
High Church fancy stuff that are taboo in those bodies. 
The result is that they usually become rip-snorting ritual- 
ists, much to the disgust of the average run of born 
Episcopalians." How illuminating! (?) 

My opinion is that the ministers who have seceded from 
the other denominations to enter the Episcopal priesthood 
have been, in every known case, men of lofty spiritual 
character, moved to take the step by the purest motives of 
loyalty to the truth, and taking it at the cost of great sa- 
crifices of old friendships and associations. They are not 
as "hungry for fancy stuff," or as "rip-snorting" as Mr. 
Grant Morgan himself! Not half as much! 

A large part of the article discusses the High, Low and 
Broad groups in the Church, called by Mr. Grant Morgan, 
"the theological row." I regret that the space available 
for me to discuss this essay is so limited that I cannot deal 
with it now. He leaves us this comforting assurance, how- 
ever: "If the threatened schism ever does come, it will 
probably be when one of the parties has become strong 
enough to attempt coercing forcibly the others to its way 
of thinking. Just now that seems as unlikely as ever." 

For which we thank God! 

I hope I have written enough to show those who have not 
read the article that they need not worry. They have lost 
nothing worth their time and attention. 



KEEPING MATTERS HUMAN. 



The Witness for August 19, 1926, contains the following: 
The Rev. George B. Gilbert, one of our great rurai 
church leaders, conducts a column in one of the national 
farm papers, signing himself the parson. A subscriber in 
Iowa sends in the following clipping from it with the brief 
comment, "Them's my sentiments." Here 'tis: 

"A bishop of our church was telling a story the other 
day about the minister who was giving a talk on the par- 
able of the Good Samaritan to a Sunday School. He got 
to the point where the priest went by on the other side. 
"Now," he cried, "why was it that they went right by and 
never went over to where the fellow lay? These priests 
were their ministers, corresponding to our minister, and 
they went right by, never going near him. Now why do 
you suppose the ministers never went near him?" A 
small boy raised his hand with a look of perfect assurance. 
"Now why was it that the ministers never went near 
him?" "Because," said the boy, "he had already been 
robbed — nothing left to go for." 



CHRISTMAS BOXES. 



Mrs. W. H. von Eberstein, Box Secretary, Washington, 
N. C, writes: 

"Besides the box to Liberia, the Church Schools will send 
gifts to 365 children in South Dakota. Gifts for 25 will 
be sent to the Seamen's Institute, Philadelphia, and Cape 
Palmas, Fishtown Station, Liberia, will receive enough for 
23 people. 

Each child receives two gifts. You see, it means quite 
a- lot to do." 



The label on The Mission Herald shows the date that 
your subscription expires. Has yours expired? If so, 
please send check to Mision Herald, Ayden, N. C, and save 
us the expense of mailing you statement. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



13 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

MRS W. 0. S. SUTHERLAND, Editor of Department, 
318 North 16th Street, Wilimington, N. C. 



I 



IMPORTANT LETTERS FROM THE EDUCATIONAL 
SECRETARIES. 



Religious Education. 

Text Books: 

General Church Program .50 

The World Call to the Church .15 

My Father's Business .25 

The World and I .25 

The Search for Peace .25 

The Spirit of Missions 1.00 per year. 

For the study classes this fall the General Church Pro- 
gram is recommended. In connection with this "The World 
Call to the Church," by Miss Boyer, an outline for program 
meetings on the "General Program," may be obtained from 
the Church Missions House, 281 Fourth Ave., New York 
City, price 15 cents, together with the General Church Pro- 
gram. A certain number of copies of the "World Call to 
the Church" will be sent to the Rector of each parish and 
mission, free of charge; and may be secured from him by 
members of the Auxiliary. They are sent out by Rev. W. 
R. Noe for use in each congregation, and are a gift. Of 
course, the General Church Program is necessary for re- 
ference. This program is for three years, 1926-1927-1928. 
In Mrs. MacMillan's program for the women's work for 
the year, she gives five meetings to the church program. 
It may be impossible for many societies to get in as many 
as five meetings before the first Sunday in December, 
which is the day for the every member canvass thiroughout 
the Diocese, but it will be possible to get in several ses- 
sions. If any assistance about the use of these outline 
programs is desired, the Educational Secretaries are will- 
ing and eager to offer suggestions and give any aid in 
their power. This is the work suggested by the National 
Department, but it is not required. If any society should 
desire another subject it can write to the Educational Se- 
cretary and another subject will be offered. The Spirit of 
Missions is always good material. "Beyond City Limits" 
is for use after Christmas. Further information on this 
subject will be given in this paper later in the year. 
MRS. T. A. McNEILL, Lumberton, N. C, 
Educational Secretary, Convocation of Wilmington. 
MISS MAE WOOD WINSLOW, Hertford, N. C, 
Educational Secretary, Convocation of Edenton. 

Mrs. J. B. Anderson's Letter. 

Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan, President of the Woman's 
Auxiliary and Parochial Society, and Mrs. J. B. Cranmer, 
Chairman of the Field Department, have written to a 
number of women in the Diocese, asking them to write 
their impressions of the Message, what it means to them, 
what they think it should mean to the women of the 
Church, and what they feel that it can and will accomplish 
in the life of the Church. From time to time we will pub- 
lish one or more of these letters in the Mission Herald. 
This, the first to be published, is from Mrs. John H. Ander- 
son, Fayetteville: 

"The Message, as adopted by the Woman's Auxiliary of 
the Triennial at New Orleans, is a distinct challenge to 
every woman of the church and extends a privilege to 



seivice individually and collectively. 

The Message should go hand in hand with the Bishops' 
Crusade and the Commission on Evangelism. We women 
of East Carolina should feel a special call, for our be- 
loved Bishop is at the head of this nation-wide effort to 
awaken the Church. If we wish to show our loyalty to 
the church and to our Bishop, we have the blessed oppor- 
tunity through the Message of more earnest preparation of 
prayer, for this great Christian awakening. 

Our Lord himself gave the first Message, which was to 
preach the Gospel to all lands; and when we realize that 
only one third of the human race knows his name (al- 
though he came two thousand years ago), we are appalled 
at the cause of this failure to carry his message to all the 
world. 

The Triennial Message, in the beginning, was sent to 
the National Council of the Woman's Auxiliary by the 
Executive Board, expressing deep concern over the finan- 
cial situation which faced the National Council. The pro- 
bable cause was luke-warmness of many Church members 
who are not using the power of Christ to meet their needs. 
The Message goes further than a mere statement of con- 
ditions, as it offers help and outlines a purpose for the 
women of the Church. This purpose is to "Dedicate our- 
selves anew to our Saviour, and to strive to give proof in 
our own lives that we believe he is the only way of life." 

The Message is an expression on the part of the women, 
of a need that is being felt in many ways all over our 
land. How to overcome the failure to obey our Lord's 
Missionary command is difficult, but much of it is due to 
indifference and selfishness. 

The question arises as to how the Message is to be pre- 
sented and how emphasized. This should be worked out 
in different ways in the various dioceses. 

Of course the thorough co-operation of the Rector is 
necessary for the accomplishment of our plans. 

How shall we go about choosing the messengers to carry 
the Message? The Auxiliary president will of course con- 
fer with the Rector as to whether he will appoint the mes- 
sengers, or whether he will wish the Auxiliary officers to 
do this. It is to be hoped that the Rector will train the 
messengers of his Parish and attend the Day of Prepara- 
tion, to which the messengers will go. 

I believe that the message should be adapted to the 
needs of each Parish, all being willing and ready to co-op- 
erate. 

It is the plan to present the Message in the fall, as soon 
as possible after the Day of Preparation, when the mes- 
sengers should be commissioned, and meet in groups or 
make calls on the women of the congregation, Reading 
matter should be given out on the Day of Preparation. 

In Virginia, the messengers make individual calls; but 
in New York the plan is to meet the women as far as pos- 
sible in groups, small enough to have an informal confer- 
ence led by the messenger. 

The messengers should not preach, but draw out thought, 
and try to impart the conviction that we need more power 
to accomplish Christ's purpose, and that he is ready to 
give us that power if we earnestly ask for it. There are 
probably many outside the Auxiliary membership who are 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



fitted to be messengers, the chief qualification being will- 
ingness. 

It is important to assign to each group in a parish the 
messenger best fitted to that group. 

The messenger should emphasize the words of the Mes- 
sage, "an awaken'ng in Christ," that we may all become 
better instruments in "His power." The value of a mes- 
sage depends upon its contents, what it tells, and the name 
given to God's message is the "Gospel" or "the Good 
News." 

To sum up the purpose of the Message: All women of 

the Church should re-dedicate themselves to Christ's work, 
and by doing this give proof in their lives that they are 
followers of Him. 

There is a beaufful word-picture of a Messenger for 
God that has come through the ages and has helped many 
lives. We find it in Isaiah 52nd chapter, 7th verse. It is 
this: "How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of 
him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace; that 
bringeth good tidings of good, that publisheth salvation; 
that saith unto Zion, thy God reigneth!" 



mum of service for the advancement of the Kingdom of 
God. 

3. To arouse a greater number of the present mem- 
bers of the Church to activity in the promotion of the work 
of the Church in their own Parish and community, in the 
Diocese and nation, and throughout the world. 

4. To win many new members for the Church of Christ 
from the ranks of the millions of unchurched people in 
America. 

5. To increase the practice of proportionate giving for 
the support and the advancement of the work of the 
Church. 

6. To secure recruits for the Christian ministry and 
for other forms of life service, both at home and abroad. 



P-ROGRAM FOR FALL WORK IN DIOCESE OF EAST 
CAROLINA. 



1. Sunday, October 3rd — Sermon on "The Massage." 

2. Four Weeks Group Discussion. 

From Monday, October 11th to Saturday, November 6th, 
at which should be considered "The World Call," which is 
a concise presentation of the purpose and work of the 
Church's Program and should be used in conjunction with 
the General Church Program. It will consist of four sec- 
tions, one of which can be discussed weekly. Copies of this 
book will be furnished free, at the rate of one to each ac- 
tive Group Leader, by Diocesan Headquarters. Orders 
should be mailed to the Executive Secretary, Rev. W. R. 
Noe, 507 Southern Building, Wilmington, N. C, at once. 

3. The District Meetings will not be held this year but 
the program will be discussed at the meetings of the Con- 
vocational. 

4. "The Three Parish" leaflets, entitled "The Presiding 
Bishop's Parish"; "The Bishop's Parish"; and "The Rec- 
tor's Parish" should be placed in the hands of your people 
during the week beginning November 21st. 

5. Intensive Week, November 21st to November 27th. 

a. Daily celebration of the Holy Communion. 

b. Parish Program Conferences. 

A convenient method for drawing the Parish together 
and outlining the work that lies ahead. Please use Bulle- 
tin No. 12 which will be supplied without cost upon appli- 
cation to Diocesan Headquarters. 

6. Every Member Canvass. November 28th to Decem- 
ber 5th. 

It is recommended that the Canvass be begun not later 
than November 28th, and close not later than December 
5th. This has the advantage of being a period during 
which the work should be completed rather than a day 
with no provision made for finishing up the follow-up work 
on pledges not secured on that day. The Canvass should 
be finished within a given period — not dragged out in- 
terminably. 

Some Aims op the Church's Program. 

1. To maintain the present program of the Church's 
work, together with all of the new enterprises inaugurated 
during the last five years. 

2. To strengthen and reinforce every congregation in 
the Church and bring it as soon as possible to the maxi- 



MR. GARDNER MAKES ANNIVERSARY A LAND 
MARK. 

The Rev. Stephen Gardner celebrated his seventh anni- 
versary as Rector of St. Peter's Church, Washington, N. 
C, on the third Sunday in September. For fifty-three 
years the third Sunday in September has been kept as an 
anniversary, it being the anniversary of the late Nathaniel 
Harding, who was the beloved Rector of the Parish for 
forty-three years. 

The celebration consisted in a corporate Communion, at 
the early service, of the Vestry of the Church and those 
who had been confirmed under the leadership of the pre- 
sent Rector. 

The Anniversary sermon was preached by the Rector at 
the eleven o'clock service. 

A campaign was also put on to raise $1,500.00 for the 
Parish House. When the offering on that Sunday was 
counted, it was found to be over $1,700.00; and on the next 
day over $500.00 was added to this fund. This will make 
it possible to continue work on the Parish House. At the 
present writing the building is over one-third completed, 
and the builders are ready to begin on the second floor. 
Every thing done on the Parish House has been paid for; 
and, so far, the Parish has borrowed no money. Most of 
the money has been raised by making a drive for a certain 
amount from time to time, this method not putting a hard- 
ship upon any one. It is hoped that the building will be 
completed during the winter or early in the Spring. The 
Memorial Chapel, which is a gift of Mrs. George H. Brown, 
will be completed and furnished by Christmas, when the 
building is completed and furnished, it will mean an outlay 
of about $90,000.00, of which $30,000.00 is being given by 
Mrs. George H. Brown to build and equip the George H. 
and Laura E. Brown Memorial Chapel. 



A CALL TO DUTY. 



This column set aside for the Young People's Service 
League, is for the benefit of all the Leagues in the Diocese. 
It can be made a real benefit to these Leagues only through 
co-opration of the different Leagues. We want your ideas, 
plans, ideals, and experiences. We want all the news of 
interest to your League. 

1. What are you doing in your League this fall? 

2. What are you planning to do? 

3. What are your methods in making your meetings in- 
teresting ? 

4. What has been your most successful program? 

5. If there is no League in your parish or mission and 
you would like to see one organized, write the Secretary. 

These are a few of the questions that each League should 
answer in full and send to the Secretary. By your co-oper- 
ation to this extent it may be the means of this column 
benefitting all the Leagues in the Diocese. Let us all know 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



15 



your experiences and plans. We will pass them on 
through this column. 

Only once a year do we meet in person, but through this 
column we might meet once a month throughout the year. 
Come on, let's ALL meet next month in this column. Will 
YOU be there? 



MISSION AT ZION HAS FINE RESULTS. 



(By the Rev. Howard Alligood.) 

The very best mission it has been my privilege to attend 
and be a part of closed at Zion Sunday night, September 
5th. The Rev. W. R. Noe conducted the Mission, beginning 
Monday night, August 30, preaching each night during 
the week, including Sunday and Sunday night, September 
5th. 

Mr. Noe preached splendid sermons which gripped the 
people from the beginning. Hundreds of people, including 
non-Episcopalians, came night after night and joined 
heartily in the services, and with intense interest listened 
to the soul stirring sermons that were delivered. Many 
declared it to be the best "meeting we ever attended," and 
I could heartily answer. Amen. 

The members of the Parish are greatly pleased with the 
results of the Mission and feel sure that much good has 
been accomplished. 

Credit is given the Rev. Stephen Gardner for assisting 
in the music. 

If there are any who have doubts as to the wisdom of 
evangelistic work in the Episcopal church, they should 
have attended this Mission and have been converted. 



GROUP MEETING AT ROPER. 



The District Group Meeting will be held at St. Luke's 
Church, Roper, N. C, on October 12th. 

MRS. J. F. LEARY, Secretary. 



COPIES OF THE MISSION HERALD WANTED. 



We shall appreciate our subscribers replenishing the 
files of the Mission Herald with the following numbers: 

September 1920, January 1921, April 1923, October 1923. 

We are particularly anxious for copies of the Septem- 
ber 1920 issue. 



ADDRESS OF WELCOME. 



(By Mr. Geo. A. Johnson, at Home Coming Day, Old St. 
John's, Pitt County, N. C, September 12th, 1926.) 

My friends, if it be true that "out of the abundance of 
the heart the mouth speaketh," I should be absolutely sat- 
isfied that what I say today would be accepted by you as 
a most cordial welcome. However, I know that I shall be 
unable to give expression to the joy and happiness that 
we, of this community, and especially those of us more 
closely allied with this old mother Church, feel, on account 
of your presence here today. 

This day I predict will be long remembered by us, for it 
is the culmination of a long felt and oft expressed desire, 
on our part, to have all those whom we have loved long 
since and "lost awhile" to come back to us, to once more 
blend our voices with theirs in prayer and in praise, in 
song, and in service, to the loving Heavenly Father who 
made us all. 

Possibly not a day has passed during all the years of 
your absence that our thoughts have not gone out to you 
in loving remembrance of your friendship, recalling to us 



the many happy days of our association with you while 
you were here among us, and indeed one of us. During 
all these years we are proud to believe that not one word 
• has been spoken by you in derogation of anything that has 
ever been taught you while within the four walls of this 
old Church. Nor do we believe that one thought has enter- 
ed your mind in censure of any of the teachings of this 
church. 

There is one note of sadness and I hate to touch upon it 
on this joyous occasion. We are sorry that all those 
whom we have lost from this Church, and from this com- 
munity, could not be with us today, but we feel that they 
are with us in spirit; and although they are absent, they 
are by no means forgotten. There are faces that you 
will miss — faces that we miss indeed. I refer to those 
who have gone to their reward; but we feel that they, too, 
are in our midst today. The life they lived, the work 
they d;d, the influence they exerted, have been reflected 
in the lives of those who followed after; and, although 
they are with us no longer in the fiesh, our loving thoughts 
go out to their memory in sincerest reverence. 

We are not unmindful that we have with us today quite 
a number who are not our former neighbors, but who have 
come to share with us the joy and happiness of the day. We 
are glad that you have come, for we have joy and happi- 
ness enough for all. We want you to enter wholly and 
thoroughly with us into the happiness that is ours. 

In conclusion, my friends, let me soy that we are in- 
deed happy to have you with us today; we want you to 
feel just as much at home as if you had never left us. We 
may not be altogether as young as we were when you left 
us, but we feel that our hearts are just as young as "In 
the days of Auld Lang Syne." 



NOTICE! 



Articles sent int to The Mission Herald must be signed in 
order to receive attention. Anonymous communications 
cannot be published. Of course, we shall withhold your 
name, if the proper course demands it. But your signa- 
ture proves that you are acting in good faith. — (Editor.) 



NEW LIGHT ON BRAZIL. 



Borrow your child's geography or secure otherwise a 
good detailed map of Brazil, and sit down with The Spirit 
of Missions for October, to become better informed and 
more enthusiastic about the work of the Brazilian Episco- 
pal Church. Dr. John Wood, returning from a thirty- 
days' visit, made at Bishop Kinsolving's request, to the 
states of Rio Grande de Sul and Sao Paulo, and the Federal 
District around Rio de Janeiro, tells his impressions of 
thirty-seven years' missionary work in the southeastern 
corner of that huge country. 



St. Agnes' School for giils, Kyoto, in its fifty-second ses- 
sion has the largest enrolment in its history, 631. 



I The Peoples Savings Bank j 

j WILMINGTON, N. C. 1 

I Will welcome your business. Four per cent Interest = 

I Compounded Quarterly allowed on all deposits. 1 



23 Years Old. Capital and Surplus $250,000.00. 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



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Carolina Beach is on the Main Land. A Beach that you can drive your Automobile to the Water's 
edge. A good hard road from Wilmington. A new modem hotel now under construction that will be 
completed for the season of 1926. Lots are sold on reasonable terms and as an investment they are ideal. 
Information gladly g'ven. Call or write any authorized representative. 

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OWNERS AND DEVELOPEKS OF 



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WILMINGTON, N. C. 



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OFFICERS:— S. C. Ogburn, President; W. F. Schaffner, Vice-President; W. W. Walsh, Vice-President; 

E. P. Yates, Vice-President; E. D. Turner, Secretary-Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS:— S. C. Ogburn, S. C. Clark, A. V. Nash, W. F. Shaffner, E. P. Yates, E. D. Turner, W. W. 

Walsh. 
J. L. BECTON, C. E., Wilmington, N. C, Engineer in charge of development. 
REFERENCES: — Any Bank or Mercantile Agency. 



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CAROLINA ROOM 



VOL. XL. 




No. 11. 




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TLrt-l)ira't|)^t*t)rarrt() $ay c0mflRm22:i7 



PARTIAL CONTENTS 




Edenton Convocation Has 185th 

Meeting 
Call to the Bishops' Crusade 

by Bishop Freeman 
Bishop Darst's Statement 
Financial Statement 
Bishops' Crusade. 
Personal Items 
Young People's Work. 




5(oujmkt, 19 2B 



O 



Vs/ 



V 



O 



Published by the Diocese of East Carolina at Ay den, N. C. 




THE MISSION HERALD. 



St. Mary^s School 

A JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Rev. WAKREN W. WAY, Rector. 



An Episcopal School for Girls. Four years High School and two 
years College Courses. Accredited. Special courses: Music, Art, 
Expression, Home Economics, Business. 

MODERN EQUIPMENT~20-ACRE CAMPUS. 

Advent session opened Sept. 15, 1926. For catalogue address 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager, Raleigh. N. C. 




Altars,Pulpits,Lecterns,Fonts,Fabrics,Embroideries ' 

Memorial Table ts, St ained Glass WindowsJ 



THE PLAN OF THE BISHOPS' CRUSADE. 

The National Commission on Evangelism has adopted a comprehensive 
plan embodying the necessary preparation for the Bishops' Crusade, which 
is now available in leaflet form. It may be obtained from diocesan com- 
missions on evangelism, or from the National Commission, at the- Cathedral 
office, Mount St. Alban, Washington, D. C. 

The National Commission defines its duties as being to select and as- 
sign the Crusaders, to supply a suggested order of services, conferences 
and meetings, prayevs, and publicity material. Diocesan commissions are 
urged to promote the general observance of St. Andrew's Day, November 
30, 1926, as a day of penitence and prayer for the Crusade, to secure local 
publicity, to organize local committees in centers where Crusades are to be 
held, and, co-operating with such committees, to secure the attendance of 
clergy and congregations from a distance. 

Preparation in the parish includes sermons by the rector, publicity in 
papers, observance of St. Andrew's Day, observance of the Friday before 
the first Sunday in Epiphany as a day of special prayer and intercession for 
the Crusade, organization of paiish groups for prayer, study and personal 
work with individuals. 

The Commission's plans, followed carefully in parish and diocese 
throughout the Church, will make sure that the whole Church will be in the 
spirit of the Crusade, that uniformity of method will be the rule, and that 
the Church will be organized not only for the Crusade, but for effective fol- 
low-up at its close. 



THE RIGHT SPIRIT. 

I have been thinking a good deal about the Bishops' Crusade, and have 
talked with Bishop Walpole on the subject. Two things we need. In the 
first place, men who feel the urgency of the Christian message, that it is 
not a thing to be dallied with, but calls for immediate action, and the second 
thing we need is that the missioners must not expect to do the whole work. 
That is to say, our function will be to stir the clergy, and especially the 
laity, to a sense of individual responsibility for the spiritual well-being of 
others. Our work should be like a torch going through the land setting fire 
he-e and there to the little groups who in turn will extened the flame until it 
becomes general. This latter feature is indispensable if we are not going to 
meet with the fate of so many attempts which, though they may edify a 
few, do not create any sense of responsibility in the minds and hearts of 
those who are touched . . . You can count on me for all that I can give 
yo"- BISHOP BRENT. 



Virginia j 

Episcopal School ! 

LYNCHBURG, VA. | 



i Prepares boys at cost for Col- 

I lege and University. Modern 

! equipment. Healthy location in 

! the mountains of Virj?:inia. Cost 

\ moderate, made possible through 

I generosity of founders. For cat- 

I alog-ue apply to 

f Rev. Wm. G. Pendleton, D. D. 

I Rector, 



Church Furnishings ] 

Gold, Silver and Brass f 

Church and Chancel j 
Furniture | 

Write for Catalogue for I 
Episcopal Churches ' 

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308 Third Street, I 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin i 




The Bank of Edenton 

SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 
Bank With us by Mail 

JULIAN WOOD, President. 
W. 0. ELLIOTT, Vice-President 
D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 



Church Vestments 

Cassocks, Surplices, Stoles 

Embroideries, Clerical Suits, 
Silks, Cloths, Fringes. 

HATS, RABATS, COLLARS 

Cox Sons & Vining 

131-133 East 23rd St. NEW YORK 

The Standing Committee of the 
Diocese has given consent for the or- 
dination of the Rev. Augustus Haw- 
kins, deacon, to the sacred office of 
the Priesthood. 




Have I realized what a fountain of 
living water I come to when I come 
to Jesus Christ? I have come to my 
Communions, I have brought my 
thimble of faith, I have come back 
with a thimbleful of grace, because 
I brought no larger vessel. — The Bis- 
hop of London, 



The Mission Herald 



Vol. XL. 



AYDEN, N. C, NOVEMBER, 1926. 



No. 11. 



EDENTON CONVOCATION HAS ITS 185TH MEETING 



REV. G. F. CAMERON PREACHES THE OPENING SERMON 



The Edenton Convocation of the Diocese of East Caro- 
lina held its 185th meeting in St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 
Greenville, N. C, beginning at 7:30 P. M., Monday, Octo- 
ber -18th, 1926, with sermon by the Rev. G. F. Cameron, 
rector of St. James' Church, Ayden, N. C., who spoke on 
the subject, "Where there is no vision the people perish," 
and especially deplored the fact that many of our indus- 
trial and political leaders oppose the proposed industrial 
survey of working conditions for women in North Caro- 
lina, and the fact that a state of practical peonage exists 
in many of our agricultural districts. The Rev. H. M. 
Green, of Winton, and the Rev. J. N. Bynum, of Belhaven, 
read the Evening Prayer at this service. 

Holy Communion was celebrated the following morn- 
ing by the Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D., of Edenton, assisted 
by the Rev. E. T. Jillson, of Hertford, N. C At 9:30 A. 
M., the Rev. J. N. Bynum, Dean of the Convocation open- 
ed the session for regular business and reports of the 
various parishes and missions. The Rev. Alexander 
Miller, of Wilmington, discussed the state of the church, 
and urged that accurate reports be rendered^ The Rev. 
W. R. Noe, executive secretary, explained fully the Every 
Member Canvass, and pointed out that its success was due 
in large part, to the support and industry of the clergy. 

The Rev. G. W. Lay, D. C. L., of BeauCort, made an ad- 
dress on Religious Education, and particularly emphasized 
the value of careful training in the Christian home; the 
Rev. G. F. Hill, of Elizabeth City, gave an intimate and 
helpful talk on the work of the charitable agencies in Eli- 
zabeth City, and stated that the Children's Home of Pas- 
quotank County, N. C, is a successful adventure in social 
service; the Rev. Charles E. Williams, of Creswell, gave a 
thrilling account of the missionary work on Lake Phelps, 
in Tyrrell County; and Dr. W. H. Dixon, superintendent of 
the Caswell Training School, Kinston, N. C., aroused the 
greatest interest when he read a paper on the subject of 
"Limiting the Supply of Mental Defectives." 

At 7:30 P. M., Tuesday, the Rev. Walter R. Noe, preach- 
ed a stirring sermon on the text, "And he was speechless." 
On Wednesday morning the Convocation discussed Men's 
Clubs, showing unusual interest, and a determination to 
perfect some sort of organization to enlist the service of 
the men in the Church. The Rev. James E. W. Cook, of 
Greenville, sketched the plan and objective of the Bishops' 
Crusade, stating that everything worth while was to be 
gained by such a movement, which might not accomplish 
all that could be desired, but would at least begin a spirit- 
ual leaven in the hearts of men and women throughout 
the Church. 

Miss Ann Milton, of Wilmington, Field Secretary of the 
Young People's Service League, Diocese of East Caro- 
lina, presented plans for the fall work. Her concise state- 



ment, clarity, and very manifest devotion to the cause of 
young people captivated the Convocation, which promised 
its heartiest co-operation. 

The following clergymen were present: Revs. Howard 
Alligood, of Washington, N. C; James E. W. Cook, of 
Greenville; G. F. Cameron, of Ayden; T. N. Brincefield, of 
Aurora; J. N- Bynum, of Belhaven; G. F. Hill, Elizabeth 
City; R. B. Drane, D. D, of Edenton; E. T. Jillson, of Hert- 
ford; H. M. Green, of Winton; G. W. Lay, D. C. L., of 
Beaufort; Sidney E. Matthews, Swan Quarter; A. J. 
Mackie, of Windsor; Alexander Miller, of Wilmington, 
Charles E. Williams, of Creswell; and Walter R. Noe, 
executive secretary of the Diocese of East Carolina, Wil- 
mington, N. C. 

The place of next year's meeting was left in the hands 
of the Dean, the Rev. J. N. Bynum, of Belhaven, N. C. 

Much praise was given the Rev. James E. W. Cook, rec- 
tor of St. Paul's Church, Greenville, and his good congre- 
gation, for their kind hospitality and for the success of the 
Convocation. 



A SUCCESSFUL MISSION. 



(Reported by the Rev. G. F- Cameron.) 
Beginning October 4th, and ending 7:30 p. m., Sunday, 
October 10th, 1926, the Rev- Charles E. Williams, of St. 
David's Church, Creswell, N. C., conducted a most suc- 
cessful Mission at St. John's Church, Pitt County, N. C- 
Mr. Williams is one of the- younger clergymen of the 
Diocese, and is a gifted evangelistic preacher. His work 
at Lake Phelps is of an unusally fine missionary adven- 
ture, and has no parallel in this section of the country. 
He .preaches with the greatest ease, clarity, and power. 
While there were no candidates for Confirmation, scores 
came forward and rededicated themselves to the service 
of their Master. It was continually emphasized that the 
Mission' was not planned to bolster the membership of the 
Episcopal Church, but to bring an increase of spiritual 
life to the community. The rector, in order to prove his 
fidelity to the absent pastors, stressed the fact again and 
again that he had much rather give the name of those so 
desiring to the pastor of another denomination- 
Many, even our friends of the Methodists, Free Will 
Baptists, and Disciples, requested that the services be 
continued for several days longer. At least 250 were 
present for the final service. 



The label on THE MISSION HERALD shows the date 
that your subscription expires. Has yours expired? If 
so, please send check to MISSION HERALD, Ayden, N. 
C, and save us the expense of mailing you statement. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



THE CALL TO THE BISHOPS' CRUSADE. 



(By Rt. Rev. James E. Freeman, D. D., LL. D) 
"He sent them to preach the Kingdom of God." 
That there has been a deeper concern felt for a more 
definite preaching of the Gospel of the Kingdom, 
m.ade evident in the action of the General Convention in 
New Orleans, when it unanimously passed a resolution 
of a crusade for Christ and His Church. City clergy and 
country clergy alike have recognized the urgent need 
of placing a fresh accent upon these mighty teachings 
that there should be created a National Commission on 
Evangelism, to urge with all insistence, the prosecution 
given to men by the Master Himself. Concern is very pro- 
perly felt that the voice of the Christian Church shall bear 
to this age, in fullness and deflniteness of utterance, what 
it believes to be the vital message of the hour. "Relig- 
ion is the opiate of the people," is the challenge sounded 
by one group that has essayed the role of recasting the 
habits and practices of a vast Empire. Reflected in other 
ways, this challenge presents itself in the life of prosper- 
ous America. The very enviable situation, from a ma- 
terial standpoint, in which this nation finds itself, renders 
more urgent the pressing of the claims of Christ, upon 
whose teachings we believe our form of civilization is 
founded. "I spake unto thee in thy prosperity but thou 
saidst, ' I will not hear,' " was the solemn declaration made 
to an ancient people in the days of their seeming self- 
security- 

A Solemn Warning. 

We may well wonder whether a like solemn warning 
may not be addr-essed to this generation and people. The 
"Gospel for an age of sin," the Gospel of hope for an age 
that has been disillusioned, is imperatively demanded. It 
is a Gospel boldly proclaimed, that is no respecter of per- 
sons, that is urgently needed today. We may well be- 
lieve that the imperilling of Christian institutions may 
result in the imperilling of those things that secure to us, 
life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 

The relation which the Church bears to the large con- 
cerns of our common life is intimate and immediate. The 
President of the republic recently said, "the government 
of a people never gets ahead of the religion of the peo- 
ple," and with striking significance, he added, "you cannot 
substitute the authority of law for the virtue of man." 

Stabilizing and strengthening men through the preach- 
ing of Christian virtues is the contribution which the 
Christian Chuich has to make, to a period characterized 
by many and strange doctrines- The Church that will 
not dare to stand for the high teachings of its Sovereign 
Master cannot and will not hold the confidence or respect, 
either of the vicious or the viituous. On the other hand, 
a Church that has fixity of conviction and defiteness 
of faith, coupled with dignity in its administration and 
worship, still continues to hold its place of commanding 
influence, and acts as the nation's first line of defence 
against those infiuences that, unchecked and unresisted, 
must ultimately destroy it. 

The Perils of a Changing Order. 

Our generation has witnessed many and far-reaching 
changes that have affected, for good or ill, the Church 
itself. With a lust for haste and a passion for change, 
various methods and agencies have been called into be- 
ing, to be tried and then superceded by others that seemed 
more adaptable to twentieth century needs- In one period 
the accent has been institutionalism, of those multiform 



agencies that have been used to interpret more fully the 
relation of the Church and its teachings to man's physical 
needs. Valuable as these agencies may have been, es- 
pecially in reaching the imaginative youth, they have laid 
burdens upon the clergy that in many instances, are "too 
heavy to be borne." 

Again, under the compulsion of colorful and fascinating, 
secular attractions, the Church, as an institution, has 
emphasized its place as the promoter of wholesome re- 
creational activities and has become the sponsor for var- 
ious forms of entertainment that were designed to coun- 
teract the baleful influences of commercialized agencies 
that were body and soul destroying. 

Again, in an age of scientific research and investigation, 
with fresh and appealing disclosures, the emphasis of the 
Church's message has been shifted to accommodate itself 
to the fascinating and alluring modern point of view. The 
most cursory study of the Church for the past twenty- 
five or more years, discloses the fact that it has proved 
itself singularly adaptable to the changed and changing 
moods of men. 

No one is disposed to dispute the wisdom of some of 
these newer aspects of the Church's life and its activities. 
On the other hand, there is abundant evidence that a too 
great insistence upon the value of these agencies and 
instrumentalities has had a tendency to withdraw the 
clergy from the assiduous pursuits of study from the 
more specific duties of a spiritual ministry, resulting in 
an over-occupation of secular activities and issuing in an 
impaired genius for preaching with power the eternal and 
saving Gospel of Christ. The situation in which we find 
ourselves is somewhat analogous to that in which the 
early Church found itself, when its over-worked min- 
istry determined to seek out men to look after the me- 
chanical details of administration, while its accredited 
leaders gave themselves more continually to prayer, med- 
itation, and the preaching of the Word. 

The Need of the Hour. 

We need to be solemnly reminded today that the only 
values that endure are spiritual values and that the su- 
preme business of the Christian Church is to bring men to 
a saving knowledge of their Lord and Saviojir. No dilut- 
ed or superficial Gospel pabulum will serve to meet the 
emergency that now confronts us. It is literally true that 
men aie at the gates of the Church demanding today, as 
they have never demanded before, "Sirs: we would see 
Jesus." 

There are abundant evidences all about us in the secu- 
lar world that there is a new and pressing demand for 
an exposition of the life and teachings of Him whose 
message is eternally new- That Christ has a message for 
the modern world, adapted to modern needs, is one of the 
most demonstrable facts of our time. The persistence of 
Jesus in human thought and aff'ection excels even the origi- 
nality of Jesus. 

Mr. Chesterton maintains that, "Christianity has not 
been tried and found wanting, it has been tried and 
found difficult." He and other great secular writers — and 
their name is legion — are urging increasingly that the 
world is facing Christward, and that its chief interest is 
in His divine person and teaching. Even so typical a 
writer as Bernard Shaw maintains that, "after having 
contemplated the world of human nature for nearly sixty 
years, I see no way out of its misery but the way which 
would have been found by Christ's will, if He had under- 
taken the work of a practical modern statesman," 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



H. G. Wells, another outstanding English writer, de- 
clares: "Religion is the first thing and until a man has 

, found God and been found by God, he begins at no 

; beginning, he works to no end. He may have his friend- 
ships, his partial loyalties, his scraps of honor, but all 
these things fall into place, and life itself falls into place, 
only with God. God who fights with men through blind 

! fears and night and non-existence, who is the end and who 
is the beginning." 

In the light of all this we may well wonder whether our 

; preaching ministry has consistently and persistently pre- 
sented Jesus Christ as the supreme need of men. Yes, we 

I may well re-examine ourselves to discover whether our 

'later methods and practices have been in demonstration 
of His life and power. Said the great Apostle concern- 

; ing those to whom he ministered, "I determined to know 
nothing among you, saving Jesus Christ and Him cruci- 

I fied" 

Evangelism rightfully considered is the supreme busi- 

', ness of the Christian ministry and the Christian Church. 
All else is subordinate to it. The greatest reformations 

I that have swept over Continents, changing the course of 
history and freshening old enthusiasms for Christ and 
His Church, have had their genesis in a re-construction of 
His divine personality and a fresh affirmation of His di- 
vine and saving truths. The power of the pulpit, yes, 
and its popularity, are made evident where thought and 
aff'ection are focused in Him, and His massage is 
brought to bear upon the difficulties and problems that 
attend the way of men the world over. 

In a singularly engaging little book, entitled, "The Arch- 
bishop"s Test," an appeal is made to the clergy of the 
Anglican Church to observe for a definite period of time, 
even to the disregard of all else, the well defined practices 
of the Church, as set forth in the Book of Common Pray- 
er. It is an appeal simply to place the whole accent of 
the Christian ministry upon those things that are essen- 
tial and indispensably- In fine, in the language of the 
Apostle, it calls upon the clergy to make "full proof of 
their ministry." 

The Call of the Church. 

The National Commission on Evangelism, assuming the 
obligation laid upon it by the general Church, makes a 
like appeal to Bishops and Clergy over the nation today. 
The Commission feels that no responsibility or obligation 
that devolves upon the ministry, exceeds in importance 
that now commended to it, in placing its whole accent upon 
the Saviour-hood of Christ and need for a re-consecration 
to Him and His Kingdom. 

The Commission has no desire to multiply machinery 
or to set up a rigid system of organization, a procedure 
that would but further contribute to burden those upon 
whom the administration of the Church now rests. The 
Commission will earnestly seek to avoid making this a 
purely sporadic movement designed to stimulate the 
Church for a brief space and then to die. 

Again, it would not identify it with any other effort put 
forth, however worthy it may be, for the purpose of in- 
creasing the Church's material well being- The Commiss- 
ion is reminded that "if this work be of men, it will come 
to naught," but on the other hand, "if it be of God, it 
must prevail." That Jesus Christ is sending men forth 
today to preach the Gospel, empowering them with His 
Holy Spirit, is, we believe, conspicuously evident. The 
criticalness of world conditions makes the fulfillment of 
our oblig-ation a matter of supreme and urgent importance. 



"Woe is me if I preach not the Gospel of Christ," was the 
heart searching cry of a great Apostle. Greater than the 
"call to the colors" is the call of the divine Master to His 
Church today. 

At the ordination to the priesthood the final prayer of- 
fered by the Bishop is as follows: 

Most merciful Father, we beseech thee to send upon 
these thy servants thy heavenly blessing; that they may 
be clothed with righteousness, and that thy Word spoken 
by their mouths may have such success, that it may never 
be spoken in vain. Grant also, that we may have grace 
to hear and receive what they shall deliver out of thy 
most Holy Word, or agreeable to the same, as the means 
of our salvation; that in all our words and deeds we may 
seek thy glory, and the increase of thy Kingdom; through 
Jesus Christ our Lord- Amen. 



BISHOP DARST'S STATEMENT- 



The plans for the Bishops' Crusade include holding mass 
meetings and conferences in one or more central points in 
every diocese in the Church for a six-day period during 
Epiphany, 1927. 

These mass meetings and conferences in each place will- 
be conducted by two Crusaders selected by the National 
Commission on Evangelism. 

The preparation for the actual Crusade week in each 
diocese will be in charge of the Diocesan Commission on 
Evangelism, which will be asked to use the Advent period 
for such preparation. 

This preparation will include conferences for clergy and 
laity, special sermons on Sundays. Quiet Days with wo- 
men of the diocese, the training of clergymen and lay- 
men for the follow-up work. 

The follow-up work to come immediately after the six- 
day Crusade in each diocese will also be in charge 
of the Diocesan Commission on Evangelism and it is hoped 
that it will take the form of a six-day Crusade conducted 
by the diocesan clergymen and laymen in every parish and 
mission in the diocese. 

The members of the National Commission are especial- 
ly anxious that the message of the Crusade be carried to 
the most remote rural section in every diocese, for the pur- 
pose of the Bishops' Crusade will not have been accom- 
plished if the effort is confined to the large cities in each 
diocese. 

NOTE. — Through the courteous co-operation of the 
Brotherhood of St- Andrew, Mr. Leon C. Palmer, one of 
the Field Secretaries of the Brotherhood, has been secured 
as Executive Secretary of our Commission and will be in 
charge of our office in Washington after September 15, 
1926- 

We also announce with gratitude that the Rev. W. J. 
Loaring Clark, D. D., has through the countesy of the Pre- 
siding Bishop and the Field Department been released 
from his duties as General Missioner for a few months in 
order that he may give his time to the field work of our 
Commission. 



NOTICE! 

I have a complete file of Journals of East Carolina and 
a number of old Journals of North Carolina, which I will 
be glad to send to any one desiring them, they to pay 
freight. 

REV. F. N. SKINNER, 

Martins Point, S. C. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA. 



100.00 
36.70 

10.00 
52.86 
80.00 
55.91 
44.63 
315.00 
25.00 
98.50 

172.79 
246.01 

24.27 
3.52 

65.00 

5.20 

25.00 
30.00 
50.00 

25.00 

1.00 

43.00 



Statements of Amounts paid on Apporionments for the 
Church's Program — Diocesan and General — to October 
27th, 1926. 

FIRST 



Location Parish Apportionment 

Edenton, St. Paul's $ 3000.00 

Wilmington, St. James 11040.00 

Woodville, Grace Church 500.00 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 100.00 

Winterville, St. Luke's 200.00 

SECOND 

Creswell, St. David's 700.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 2415.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 4300.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 1500.00 

Greenville, St. Paul's 2100.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 1000.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 2500.00 

New Bern, Christ Church 4000.00 

Plymouth, Grace Church 1000.00 

Washington, St. Peter's 4500.00 

Wilmington, St. John's -_- 3000.00 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 1995.00 

Windsor, St. Thomas' 800.00 

THIRD 

Ayden, St. James 320.00 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 600.00 

Belhaven, St. James 500.00 

Bonnerton, St. John's 100.00 

Clinton, St. Paul's 400.00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 250.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 200.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 350.00 

Southport, St. Philip's 250.00 

Williamston, Advent 500.00 

Winton, St. John's 200.00 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 300.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 530.00 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 125.00 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas 200.00 

Warsaw, Calvary 80.00 

Whiteville, Grace Church 90.00 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 100.00 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 100.00 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's , 70.00 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 60.00 

FOURTH 

Atkinson, St. Thomas 100.00 

Aurora, Holy Cross 500.00 

Bath, St. Thomas 100.00 

Chocowinity, Trinity 100.00 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 200.00 

Grifton, St. John's 250.00 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 150.00 

Jessama, Zion 275.00 

Lake Landing, St. George's 250.00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 400.00 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's ■ 100.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Inocents' 240.00 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 100.00 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 300.00 

Wilmington, St. Mark's 400.00 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 150.00 

Bunyan, St. Stephen's 25.00 

Edenton, St. John's 150.00 

Edward, Redeemer 25.00 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 50.00 

Fairfield, All Saints' 35.00 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 50.00 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 50.00 

Lumberton, Trinity 100.00 

Maxton, St. Matthew's 50.00 

North West, All Soul's 50.00 

Sladesville, St. John's 30.00 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 100.00 



Paid by 


Prid by 


Parish 


Ch. School 


$2187.55 


JIOO.OO 


8121.53 


880.02 




61.00 


53.42 




160.00 


26.00 


225.00 


125.00 


950.00 


350.00 


1529.00 





688.40 


61.64 


700.00 


200.00 


300.00 


133.09 


38.19 


100.00 


850.00 


454.29 


100.00 


75.00 


2625.00 


411.86 


1568.16 


182.55 


318.66 


182.84 


112.60 


76.70 


100.00 




350.59 


78.01 


278.76 


100.00 


72.96 




162.05 


55.19 


77.83 


18.70 




40.00 


184.60 


45.00 


150.00 


100.00 




35.00 


85.00 


15.00 


150.00 


50.00 


185.26 


76.72 


95.00 


17.55 


66.00 




40.00 






25.00 


6.00 


35.00 


58.00 


11.49 


72.15 


7.21 


30.00 


2.15 



Trenion, Grace Church 

Washington, St. Paul's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Kinston, Christ Church 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Oriental, St. Thomas' 

Pikeville, Mission 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Robersonville, Mission 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Haddock Cross Roads, St. Stephen's- 

Williamston, St. Ignatius' 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission 

Wrightsville, "McCumbcr's Mission". 
Farmville, Mission 



125.00 




42.00 


250.00 


25.46 


9.46 


100.00 


45.88 


54.77 


100.00 


9.00 


6.00 


40.00 


25.00 


10.25 


100.00 




12.50 


125.00 


15.00 


3.00 


50.00 


41.00 




75.00 


56.25 


30.00 


50.00 


34.00 




25.00 






50.00 


50.00 




48.00 


30.00 


5.56 


25.00 






60.00 


12.97 




130.00 






30.00 




8.32 


15.00 




5.00 


20.00 


5.00 




15.00 







Total $55,715.00 $25,160.68 $4918.62 

Amount paid by parishes, missions, and Church Schools, $30,079.30 
WALTER R. NOE, Ex. Secretary. 
507 Southern Building, Wilmington, N. C. 



IS YOUR CHURCH IN THIS LIST? 



One of the greatest benefactors of the Diocese of East 
Carolina is the American Church Building Fund Com- 
mission, which has made gifts for building purposes in 
every part of the Diocese. In many places pioneer work 
would have been permanently crippled without the ma- 
terial assistance of the Commission. It has helped again 
and again to relieve the distress of our rectors and con- 
g-regations in their building progTams. 

The congi-egations that are helped by the Commission 
promise to make an annual contribution; and the Com- 
mission cannot enlarge the scope of its usefulness without 
these contributions. The following places in East Caro- 
lina have been helped with gifts: 

Elizabeth City — St. John's Kinston — St. Augustine's 

Farmville Wilmington — Good Shepherd 

Atkinson Kinston — Christ Chapel 

Columbia — St- Andrews's Greenville 

Yeatsville Whiteville 

Winfall Lumberton 

55.00 Murfreesboro Stonewall 

4.75 Creswell — Christ Church Creswell — St. David's 

^^■"^ Ayden— St. James Northwest 

20.00 

27.14 Winterville . i ayetteville — St. Philip's 

20.00 Fairfield Wilmington — ^Ascension 

23-40 Red Springs Grifton 

,„■ . Warsaw Aurora 

00. 00 

12.40 Burgaw Clinton — St. Paul's (2) 

22.50 Sunset Park — (Now St. An- New Bern — St. Cyprian's 
''■^^ drew's Morehead City) Goldsboro 

283 00 

jp'qq Haddock Cross Roads Wrightsville Sound 

-I""I 0^ these. Good Shepherd, Wilmington, Aurora, Ayden 

18.75 and Grifton have made offerings for the year 1926-. Is 

"Voo your church or parish house in the list? If so, see that 

15.00 offering is made to the Building Fund Commission, in 

"looo order to show your appreciation for what the Commiss- 
ion has done for you. Building- Fund Sunday is Novem- 

ber 14th. Offerings may be sent directly to the American 

Church Building Fund Commission, 281 Fourth Ave., New 

"g^oo York City.— G- F. C. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



THE BISHOPS' CRUSADE. 



A Statement by the National Commission on Evangelism 
To Every Member of the Church. 

The National Commission on Evangelism was created 
in 1925 by General Convention in response to a widespread 
appeal from all parts of the Church for a new emphasis 
upon the value and necessity of incorporating personal 
evangelism in the life of the membership of the Church. 

The testimony received by the Commission evidences 
afresh the world's need of a real and vital religion — a need 
which the Church can best meet by pressing the high 
claims of evangelism, that is, recognizing in a more 
emphatic way the saving of the world through a living 
Christ. 

The Commission strongly feels that this must not be 
merely an ephemeral movement, and again that it shall not 
be characterized by an elaboration of details or the setting 
up of complicated machinery- 

Objectives. 

After prayerful consideration the Commission sets forth 
the following as indicating the purpose and objective of 
the approaching effort throughout the whole Church, the 
initial step of which is the Bishops' Crusade- A Call to 
Rededication to Jesus Christ in Life and Service, by 

1. Confession of Christ openly before men as Lord and 
Saviour. "Not only with our lips, but in our lives." 

2. Regular daily individual and family prayer. "Lord, 
teach us to pray." 

3. Understanding better the mind of Christ through 
f daily Bible reading. "That I may know Him and the 

power of His resurrection." 

4. Seeking strength for service through worship and 
sacrament- "I can do all things through Christ which 
strengtheneth me-" 

5. Active service by every member of the Church. "La- 
• borers together with God." 

6. Developing a deeper sense of individual responsi- 
[bility for bringing others to Christ. "He first findeth his 
fown brother ... He brought him to Jesus." 

7. Earnest effort to combat worldliness by more con- 
I sistent practice of the Christian life- "What do ye more 

than others?" 

Collect of the Commission. 
Almighty God, whose Son Jesus Christ came to cast 
fire upon the earth; grant that by the prayers of thy faith- 
ful people a fire of burning zeal may be kindled and pass 
from heart to heart, that the light of thy Church may 
shine forth bright and clear ; through the same Thy Son 
[Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. — From the Grey Book. 

In my judgment the "Objective"' is well planned, wisely 
'formulated and worthy the consideration and co-operation 
of the whole Church for the accomplishment of the pur- 
j pose of the Commission. 

Faithfully yours, 
JOHN G. MURRAY, Presiding Bishop. 



SAINT MARY'S HAS FINE OPENING. 



Saint Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, began the 85th 
annual session on September 16th- The capacity of the 
school has been taxed and students seeking admission not 
able to enter for lack of room. The enrollment is 204 resi- 
dent students, coming from eighteen states. In addition 
are 57 day students in the city of Raleigh taking regular 
or special work. 



The faculty has been enlarged and strengthened. 

The new swimming pool is a source of great enjoyment. 
On Sunday afternoon the new Chapel organ was used for 
the first time. It is a three manual organ of seventeen 
speaking stops, detached console and every mechanical 
feature of modern equipment. The instrument is a me- 
morial to the Rev.. Bennett Smedes, second rector of Saint 
Mary's- Everybody is warm in praise of the beautiful 
tone qualities of the organ. 

Altogether Saint Mary's seems to be commencing one of 
the most auspicious years in its history. 



THE PARTRICKS ARE CORDIALLY RECEIVED. 



The new rector of Trinity Church, Scotland Neck, and 
Advent, Enfield, the Rev. Theodore Partrick, Jr., and his 
family have received many kind attentions during the first 
month of their stay- The rectory in Scotland Neck was 
renovated and refurnished by the people there, and every- 
thing possible has been done for the comfort and happi- 
ness of its occupants. 

An unusual example of the fine spirit of friendliness 
that exists in Scotland Neck was shown recently when 
the new Baptist and Episcopal clergymen with their wives, 
were given a joint reception in the Sunday school rooms 
of the Baptist church, and welcomed to town by members 
of all the churches. 

On the occasion of the first service that Mr. Partrick 
held in Enfield, all of the churches of the town gave up 
their evening services, in order that they might welcome 
the newcomer and worship with the Episcopalians. This 
gracious gesture was greatly appreciated. 



NEWS FROM THE REV. A. J. MACKIE'S FIELD. 



We have organized men's clubs at Avoca, Windsor and 
Woodville. 

Three teachers in the Woodville Church Schod, Mrs. C. 
B. Griffin, Mrs. T. W. Griffin and Mrs. T. I. Phelps, have 
received N. A. T. A. credits for work done in "The Pupil," 
Unit 1, in the standard teacher training course. They are 
now studying Unit 2, "The Teacher." As a result of this 
class, which meets once a week, the school has been reor- 
ganized and graded, and Christian nurture has been adopt- 
ed in all grades. 

Windsor, Roxobel, and Woodville, had special services 
on St. Luke's Day, October 18, when the U. T. O. was 
presented 

The Woman's Guild of St. Thomas' Church, Windsor, 
has united with the Woman's Auxiliary, to carry out more 
effectively the Diocesan program. 

An altar Guild has recently been organized in St. 
• Thomas' Church, Windsor. 

The children of Grace Church School, Woodville, have 
organized a Program of Service. 



A REQUEST. 



I am very anxious to complete a file of the Mission 
Herald for the six years tbat I edited it. The following 
numbers are missing: December 1920, January 1922, Feb- 
ruary 1922, October 1923, and January 1924. If any 
readers of the Mission Herald have these numbers they 
will confer a great favor by sending them to me. 

THEODORE PARTRICK, Jr- 

Scotland Neck, N. C. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Eht mfssmn B^ralb 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly at 

AYDEN, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance. 

EDITORIAL STAFF: 

Editor: 

REV. GEORGE F. CAMERON, B.A., B.D. 

Contributing Editors: 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D.D. 
REV. R. B. DRANE, D.D. 
REV. JAMES E. W. COOK, 
MRS. HENRY J. McMILLAN. 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, Ay- 
den, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their addresses, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Manager, 
giving when necessary, both the old and new addresses. 

Subscribers wishing to discontinue their subscriptions 
should so notify the Manager, as an absence of such notifi- 
cation is considered a continuance of the subscription. 

All articles for publication should reach the Business 
Manager by the 25th of the month. New subscriptions, 
renewals, requests for change of address and copy for ad- 
vertisements should be sent to 

REV. GEORGE F. CAMERON, 

Ayden, N. C. 

NOTICE TO OUR READERS- 

The Business Manager of the Mission Herald, upon tak- 
ing office, found the subscription list badly in arrears. 
Statements of account have been sent out, and the re- 
sponse has been fairly gratifying. In some cases, how- 
ever, misunderstanding can be averted if subscribers will 
remember that all subscriptions are expected to be paid in 
advance. All publications are published on this principle; 
and, of all papers, a religious magazine needs cash rather 
than credit to live a healthy life- 

If you are on the back list, a prompt remittance is re- 
quested for the good of the cause. 

TEN MONTHS GONE! 

This is the beginning of November. Only two months 
of the year 1926 remain. According to the financial state- 
ment, printed elsewhere in this issue, we must raise $25,- 
635.70 in order to avoid a deficit at the end of the year. 
This means that we have got to raise nearly one-half of 
our budget in the Diocese of East Carolina — 46 per cent 
to be exact— in one-sixth of a year. 

A cursory glance of the list will show that dilatoriness 
in the payment of our pledges is confined to no particular 
geographical section of the Diocese. All have fallen short 
of the Glory of God. Nor is it an economic affliction, — 
parishes and missions in the rich tobacco belt, where ex- 
traordinarily high prices have prevailed all the season, are 



behind even as those that are in sections where the low 
price of cotton has caused grave concern. Whatever the 
cause — we believe we could mention a dozen factors — let's 
pay these apportionments, get the budget out of the way, 
so the Word of God can be preached without hindrance. 

Every conference, convocation, and nieeting in the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina during the past few months has 
sent resolutions to Bishop Darst assuring him of pur love 
and devotion. One way of showing our sincerity in these 
resolutions is to pay promptly the apportionment of our 
parish or mission for the year 1926. G. F. C. 



PRISON NEWS. 

We have just received a copy of the first edition of 
Prison News, printed by the North Carolina State Prison, 
and edited by the prisoners. The prisoners will also do 
printing for the various state departments and the pri- 
son. Their print shop will be a training ground for those 
prisoners who are capable and willing to apply them- 
selves. Many prisoners will thereby learn the printing 
trade and be able to follow a reputable business after 
their terms expire. This method of helping those in con- 
finement will commend itself generally to the people of 
North Carolina. We congratulate the prisoners upon the 
quality and tone of their first edition. May they succeed 
wonderfully well! — G. F. C. 



A SUBLIME DUTY. 

It has been revealed from time to time that the Diocese 
of East Carolina does not contribute enough to support 
adequately the children she sends to the Thompson Or- 
phanage. In other words, we send children to the or- 
phanage for other people to support. Whether intentional 
or unintentional, the fact remains. 

Realizing this condition, and believing that a sensible 
plan would remedy the unpleasant state, the Diocesan 
Convention in Wilmington, last January, passed the fol- 
lowing: 

"Resolved, That we guarantee to the Thompson Orphan- 
age $7,000 for the year 1928. That, in order to raise this 
amount, we recommend to the various parishes that they 
set aside either the Thanksgiving or the Christmas offer- 
ing for this purpose. Further, that we recommend to 
each parish a certain set amount which would represent 
its share of this obligation, if we are to do our duty to our 
orphanage children, and that we request that they set that 
amount as their objective in making these offerings, and 
that a committee be appointed to carry out this resolu- 
tion." 

The fulfillment of this resolution is not only a beautiful 
privilege, it is a sublime duty. How shall our Diocese 
meet this obligation? It will meet it in so far as each 
parish and mission meets its orphanage quota, which is 
really an insignificant sum when considered in the light of 
our ability to pay. Inquire of your rector what is your 
parish's quota, and let's discharge this obligation nobly 
and enjoy the thrill that the leper had when he alone, of 
all the ten that were healed, returned and gave thanks and 
glorified God. G. F. C. 



WHITE CROSSES IN FLANDERS FIELDS. 

Armistice Day, which will be celebrated after various 
moods and fashions throughout the world on November 
11th, is being heralded as a day of PATRIOTISM. What 
does the word "patriotism" mean to us? In the abstract 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



it means devotion to the welfare of one's country. But 
men disagree on what the phrase, "welfare of one's 
country," means. Some think that it begins and ends 
with flag waving, being enrapt by the strains of martial 
music, or bragging about what this country has done or 
could do upon the field of battle. 

Now, we make no claim whatsoever to absolute truth; 
but we do know that it is none of those things- War is 
the most damnable enterprise that any nation ever en- 
gaged in; and there is no known evil that does not follow 
in its wake. When the American Doughboy crawled 
through bloody 'mud, out of the trenches, and stumbled 
on to the cold, stiff, mangled form of his brother, and cried. 
Hell! and when he returned home after the Armistice and 
found that the so-called protectors of his home had really 
desecrated it, and he again cried, Hell! he used the only 
term in the English language that adequately describes 
such conditions. 

It is an anomaly to state that war brings peace. In 
the nature of the case, such would be impossible. It is 
true that an aggressive military policy elevated Alexan- 
der the Great, but it also caused the destruction of his 
empire; it is true that the Roman Empire was built upon 
militarism, but it is also true that militarism caused its 
destruction; the Civil War brought more suffering, disease, 
and hatred, than deliverance; and finally note that the 
state of Europe has been far worse since than before the 
World War. No, patriotism cannot consist in glorifying 
war! 

We believe that there is a real distinction between Pa- 
gan Patriotism and Christian Patriotism- The former 
will ever glorify war, the latter will ever seek to usher in 
peace and to make the world the parliament of man with 
the principle of brotherhood its chiefest characteristic. 
■ Christian Patriotism will consist in joining forces with 

the Peace Movement that is now going on among the na- 
tions of the world; and the Peace Movement, featured by 
a willingness to agree to cardinal principles, embrace's the 
careful study and realization of such ideals as the World 
Court, methods of arbitration, disarmament progTams, at- 
tendance upon and co-operation with World Conferences 
on Peace, and the vividly real knowledge that militarism 
means destruction. 

The white crosses in Flanders Fields mark the resting 
places of those who died to end war. ITie whiteness of 
the crosses ought to remind us of the ideal of peace that 
was pictured in the minds of those who lie beneath them, 
those who thought that they were winning a war to end 
war. Let us not spatter the white crosses with more 
blood; but let us make heroic sacrifices to keep faith with 
those who died to end war. G. F- C. 



THE BISHOPS' CRUSADE. 

The Bishops' Crusade, particulars of which will be found 
elsewhere in this issue of the MISSION HERALD, is rap- 
idly drawing near. Epiphany will soon come; and it will 
be a great tragedy for the Church, if we all slumber and 
sleep while the Bridegroom tarries. It is called the Bish- 
ops' Crusade, not because it is theirs alone, but because 
they are willing to lead all who are ready to follow. 

What is our attitude towards this movement? Shall 
we make it our own Crusade? Are we prepared to make 
sacrifices to promote its success? Shall we stand outside 
and watch the procession go by ? or, with the abandonment 



of love, throw ourselves into this modern campaign to 
capture the citadel of Satan and set his captives free for 
our Lord? 

We have heard it said tbat "This movement will do us 
no good: you cannot change an old aristocratic Church in- 
to an evangelistic affair," and so on. Of course, this is 
not true. Episcopalians have ever been in the vanguard 
of the Church's onward march, bearing the glad news of a 
living and saving Lord, which is God's-spell to win hearts 
hungry for news from a far country. I believe these 
"croakings" are only the creaking of a few good chariot 
wheels that have rusted through rest. They need the 
Crusade more than others, perhaps. But, even if what 
they say is true, is not the salvation of a single soul of 
greater importance than ornate ritual and correct genu- 
flecions? 

The story is told of a Spanish king who died from cold 
because his titled courtiers, surrounding his sick-bed, 
would not so far forget their etiquette as to put fuel on 
the fire. If our religious etiquette prevents our rendering 
the highest service to our fellowman, it can do us no real 
good and will do them much harm- Let it go. 

We believe the coming Crusade is the biggest thing the 
Church has undertaken since the Reformation. It has* 
been conceived in chivalrous devotion to the Lord Jesus, 
nourished by prayer, and sacrificial service of those who 
are promoting it- Let us, as we realize the vastness of the 
Crusade and all its possibilities for good, joyfully and 
prayerfully prepare our hearts for larger service, and, 
as the gathering crowds raise the cry, "Behold, the Bride- 
groom Cometh! Go ye forth to meet him," we may ex- 
pect to find Christ coming again by the Holy Spirit in the 
Crusade. Let us pray as we sing: 

"Come, Holy Spirit, heavenly dove, 

With all Thy quickening powers; 
Kindle a flame of sacred love 

In these cold hearts of ours!" 

The success of the Bishops' Crusade will not depend so 
much upon them who lead, as upon us, who follow. No 
battle was ever won without courage and sacrifice of the 
rank and file. Let us re-dedicate ourselves now to the 
loyal service of our Lord Jesus. 

It was the custom in ancient Athens for the scholars to 
bring gifts to their teachers at the beginning of each 
school term. Socrates, seated upon his raised dias, was 
once receiving these tokens of his pupils' affection. They 
brought him gold, silver, perfumes from the Orient, silks 
and precious stones. At length one young man, the son 
of the richest family in Athens and of the bluest blood, 
arose and walked down the aisle towards the great philos- 
opher. The school, was amazed to see that he, of all 
others, bore no gift in his hand- But, upon reaching the 
dias, the youth fell down upon his knees, and with love 
trembling in his eyes and in his voice said, "0 Socrates, 
I give myself to thee!" 

That was the greatest and best gift of all. If we, draw- 
ing near to the Cross of our Saviour, will look up and 
say in the sincerity of our love, "0 Christ of God, my 
Teacher, my Friend, I give myself to Thee," the Bishops' 
Crusade will be a wonderful blessing and success for us. 

JAMES E. W. COOK, 
St. Paul's Rectory, Greenville, N. C. 

October 26, 1926. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



NOTICE OF THE WILMINGTON CONVOCATION. 



MEMORIALS 



MRS. THOMAS HARVEY. 

"She was a woman, take her for all in all, 
We shall not see her like again," 

On the evening of September 19th, the sweet spirit of 
Laura Sugg, the beloved wife of Thomas Harvey, passed 
from earth to Paradise. 

She came of a long- line of North Carolina's bravest and 
best. Her ancestors were active in Colonial days for the 
good of the colonies. Her great grandfather was a brave 
soldier in the Revolutionary War- In those days that tried 
men's souls — the war between the States — her people were 
faithful to their own Southland, her father being a sol- 
dier. 

She lived a life that was an honor to her ancestry, 
typifying the noblest and best- 
To her husband she was a true helpmate, a faithful, de- 
voted wife and mother, ready to spend and be spent. 

It must be a great comfort to her family to know that 
she knew of their love and appreciation for her even be- 
fore she was taken ill. 

She was that rare soul that knew what to say and what 
not to say. Never any unkind or hurtful word passed her 
lips. A true and loyal friend, beloved by all that knew 
her. 

She was a devoted churchwoman and gave freely of 
herself in every good work, never wearied in well doing. 

The many people at her funeral, the messages which 
came, and the flowers that cover her grave give some idea 
of the love she inspired. 

Surely this woman of God, now absent from the body 
is present with the Lord. L. H, H. 



MRS. LELA MARGARET JONES. 

Died in Edenton, N. C-, at the family residence, on Fri- 
day, October 8th, 1926, Mrs. Lela Margaret Jones, vddow 
of John Meredith Jones, Sr-, in the seventy-third year of 
her age. 

For years she had been somewhat an invalid, and was 
not much abroad from home. Her chosen sphere was her 
home, which she endeared to her family and her friends. 

She is survived by three sons and four daughters: 
Messrs. Henry J. Meredith, and Frank Jones, all of Eden- 
ton; and Mrs. E. R. Marriner, of New Bern, Mrs. Marvin 
Simpson, Mrs. W- M. Coffield, and Miss Sallie Jones, of 
Edenton. 



The Rev. H. G. England conducted a most helpful mis- 
sion at Christ Church, Hope Mills, beginning Sunday, Oc- 
tober 10th, and ending the following Friday evening. Our 
own people and the people of the community, generally, 

took a deep interest; and much good was accomplished. 

* * * 

At a meeting of the Standing Committee of the Diocese 
held in St. Paul's Parish House, Edenton, on October 6th, 
the Rev- J. E- W. Cook, of Greenville, was elected to fill the 

unexpired term of the Rev. Theodore Partrick, resigned. 

* * .* 

The Wilmington Convocation meets in Grace Church, 
Whiteville, N. C, November 10th and 11th. 



The Wilmington Convocation meets November 10th and 
11th, 1926, in Grace Church, Whiteville, N. C. The pro- 
gi'am follows: 

Wednesday, November Tenth. 

7:30 P. M. — E. P. and Sermon— the Rev. F. D. Dean, the 
Rev. G. F. Cameron. 

Preacher: The Rev. Archer Boogher, Rec- 
tor, St. John's Church, Fayetteville, N. C.-- 
Thursday, November Eleventh. 
-Celebration of the Holy Communion — 
The Rev. W. O. Cone, the Rev. H. G. Eng- 
land. 

A. M. — Business Session. 

A. M.- — Reports of Clergy. 

A. M.— The State of the Church . 



7:30 A. M. 



9:30-10:30 
10:30-11:00 
11:00-11:30 



Joint Sessions. 

12 M. Noon day Prayers for Missions — 

The Rev. H. D. Cone. 
12:00- 1:00 P. M.— Young People's Work- 
Miss Ann Milton. 
1:00- 2:30 P. M.— Luncheon. 
2:30- 3:00 P. M.— The Every Member Canvass— 

The Rev. W. R. Noe. 
3:00- 4:00 P. M.— Woman's Work— Mrs. S. P. Adams. 
4:00- 5:00 P. M.— Religious Education— 

The Rev. G. W. Lay, D. C. L. 
7:30 P. M-— E. P. and Address— 

The Rev. J. Hartley, Ph. D.; The Rev. G. H. 
Madara. Subject: Evangelism. Speaker: 
The Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., Rector, St. 
James' Church, Wilmington, N. C. 

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY and PAROCHIAL SOCIETY. 
Thursday, November Eleventh. 

9:30-11:30 A. M.— Business Session. 

Opening Prayers — Rev. J. B. Gibble. 
Address of Welcome — Mrs. Manley Hill. 
Response — Mrs. W. S. Davis. 
Roll Call. 

Plans for 1926-27— Mrs. H. J. MacMillan. 
Educational Work— Mrs. T. A. McNeill. 
The United Thank Offering- 
Mrs. J. G. Staton. 
Box Work — Mrs. Leighton Huske. 
Financial Report— Mrs. A. H. Worth. 
Why should I be a member of the Woman's 
Auxiliary to the National Council — Mrs. 
Wallace Huffines. 
The Conference Period in the afternoon includes the fol- 
lowing important subjects: — The Departmental Work — 
Mrs. H. J. MacMillan. Assisting Mrs. MacMillan, the 
Chairmen of the Departments. 

Missions — Mrs. Richard Williams, Mrs. S. P. Adams. 
Religious Education — Mrs. T. A. McNeill. 
Publicity— Mrs. W. 0. S. Sutherland. 
Field Department — Mrs. J. B. Cramner. 
Triennial Impressions of "The Message" — Mrs. Swift 
Boatwright. 

The United Thank Offering— Mrs. J. G. Staton. 
The Apportionment for 1926— Mrs. A. H. Worth. 
Delegates are requested to notify Mrs. Manley A. Hill, 
Vineland, N. C, Chairman of the Hospitality Committee. 
REV. ALEXANDER MILLER, Dean. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



11 



PERSONAL ITEMS 



The Rev. A. C. Tebeau, rector of Emmanuel Church, 
Bristol, Va., and former vestryman of St. John's Church, 
Fayetteville, N. C, has accepted a call to Monumental 
Church, Richmond, Va., which is one of the larger chur- 
ches in the Diocese of Virginia. His friends in East Caro- 
lina wish him continued happiness and success in his new 
field. 



The many friends of the Rev. Dr. Berryman Green, 
Dean of the Theological Seminary in Virginia, Alexandria, 
Va., will be grieved to know that he has been ill, and had 
to undergo a serious surgical operation in a hospital in 
Washington, D. C. His condition, however, is reported as 
satisfactory to the doctors, and it is hoped that his recov- 
ery will be speedy and complete. 



The Rev. James E. W. Cook, rector of St. Paul's Church, 
Greenville, N. C., went to Wilmington, October 20th, to 
speak to the Scottish Rite Masons. 



The Mission Herald recently enjoyed a visit by the Rev. 
Sidney E. Matthews, of Swan Quarter, who was on his 
way to Raleigh. 

Our beloved Bishop Darst had a very strenuous schedule 
during October. His program was made up of sermons, 
conferences, and addresses, etc., in New York City, Balti- 
more, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Tulsa, Oklahoma, Bethle- 
hem, Pa., Roanoke, Va., and Washington, winding up in 
Edenton, N. C, October 31st. We are expecting a good 
letter from him for our November issue. 



The Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Penick, D. D., Bishop Coadjutor 
of the Diocese of North Carolina, was greeted by large 
and appreciative congregations in St. Paul's Church, 
Greenville, at 11:00 A. M., and St. James' Church, Ayden, 
at 7:30 P. M., Sunday, October 24th, 1926. On account of 
a slight touch of ptomaine poison, the good Bishop can- 
celled the rest of his appointments for that week, and 
returned to Charlotte Wednesday. He will return to 
East Carolina in the near future and fill his other engage- 
ments. 



The Rev. Frank D. Dean, M. D., of Wilmington, well 
known as a missioner, conducted a preaching mission in 
Trinity Church, Scotland Neck, N. C, for a week, beginn- 
ing October 11th, 1926. ' ' 



Dr. C. J. Sawyer, of Windsor, and Col. R. R. Gotten, of 
Bruce, are hereby placed on the honor roll, because they 
were the only two laymen that attended the Edenton Con- 
vocation in St. Paul's, Greenville. 



The Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., of Wilmington, N. C, has 
been appointed a member of the sub-committee on Pre- 
paration for the Bishops' Crusade. 



Dr. Ira M. Hardy, of Kinston ,for many years a member 
of the Board of Managers from the Diocese of East Caro- 
lina, visited the Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte, N. C, 
October 19th. He was much pleased with the new build- 
ings and the many improvements made since his last visit. 



DR. 



DRANE ADDRESSES "GET-TOGETHER 
MEETING" 



At the "Get-Together Meeting" in St. Luke's Church, 
Roper, N. C, October 12th, 1926, the Rev. R. B. Drane, 
D. D., of Edenton, N. C., delivered an engaging address on 
"The Progress of the Church in the Last Fifty Years." 
We give here some interesting extracts: 

"With reference to organized Christianity, is it not sig- 
nificant, according to the oft repeated assertion of some 
Christians who have considered the situation, that this 
woild of man might be converted to Christ within the 
next generation, if every individual Christian now was 
such a disciple of the Master and such an active member 
of His Church as most of the early Christians were?" 

After reviewing the efforts of the General Convention 
and the Lambeth Conference, during the past forty years, 
to effect reunion, he says: 

"These efforts are for the re-union of Christendom, not 
simply a re-union of Protestantism- Pan-Protestantism 
is not the goal of the movement. The movement would 
include the Holy Orthodox Eastern, or Greek Church, the 
Roman Catholic, all denominations of Protestants, with 
Anglicans and Americans; all who profess and call them- 
selves Christians, "that they all may be one," as our 
Saviour Jesus Christ prayed that they might be-" 

In speaking of the Diocese of East Carolina, he said, 
"Fifty years ago our church in the whole state of North 
Carolina gave a total of $206,964.71 for the three years 
preceding 1877. The last report to the General Conven- 
tion of 1925, for the three years immediately preceding, 
shows that the three dioceses made the following contri- 
butions: 

East Carolina $ 552,997.35 

North Carolina 1,125,312.00 

Western North Carolina 281.016.15 

Grand total $1,959,325.50 

The grand total is more than nine times as much as the 
undivided Diocese gave fifty years ago. East Carolina is 
now giving two and one-half times as much as our Church 
in the whole state gave fifty years ago." 

"What of the Convocational system in vogue fifty years 
ago, an inheritance from a former day? It was indeed 
a most useful missionary ag-ency. The Convocation of 
Edenton was particularly active and efficient under its 
venerated Dean, the Rev. Dr- Nicholas Collin Hughes, of 
blessed memory. In those days the extent of territory, 
and the badness of roads hindered the Bishop from fre- 
quently meeting with the Convocation, which went on 
without him; and, by its undertakings one year, induced 
Bishop Watson, in his annual address to the Council, to 
remind all concerned that "this was an Episcopal Church," 
not a "presbyterial-" Now, our Bishop meets with us, 
and Convocation is something like a little Convention. 
Probably good roads have something to do with this." 

He predicted for the next fifty years greater things 
than we have seen in the past fifty, and closed with these 
stirring words, "May God grant that the new methods 
adopted by the Church for informing the minds of our 
people and quickening their spirits may be blessed of the 
Holy Spirit; and, in particular, may this Get-Together 
Meeting, and the Bishops' Crusade for which we are pre- 
paring, be blessed of Him for making Christ known to one 
and all in this land, and in every land." 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

MRS. W. 0. S. SUTHERLAND, Editor of Department, 
318 North 16th Street, Wilimington, N. C. 



MRS. GUY G. SMALL'S LETTER. 



The Messag-e as delivered at the Triennial, at New Or- 
leans, to the Women of the Church, is so wonderful, so 
spiritual, it seems in its wording as if it were inspiring; 
and its value, if rightly interpreted and its ideas carried 
out, cannot be estimated. If the six articles, to which 
the women are pledged, are analyzed, and faithfully ex- 
plained, think of the influence it ought to bring about in 
the years until the next Triennial. The whole Message 
breathes such unselfishness, and such devotion to our be- 
loved Church, how can any Episcopalian, even with only 
one reading of the Message be luke-warm, or indifferent? 
She ought to be "on fire with zeal." 

First Article. The money part. Of course, money is 
needed to carry on our church work; but need we stress 
money so much as the idea of increasing interest in the 
Church ? 

Second Article. Overcoming luke-warmness is so inter- 
tertwined with the first point that overcoming the second 
will, without any doubt, correct the money deficiency. 
Christ said, "Let your light so shine that men may see 
your good works." We feel that somehow all else will 
follow; overcoming lukewarmness; being on fire for God 
and Christ; somehow the money will be forth coming- As 
it says in our Christian Stewarship book, "Business al- 
ways follows the Cross." Point out to the women that if 
they have fine autos, pretty clothes, whist parties, and 
dances galore, they must give up in proportion to our 
Lord like the faithful steward,— the tenth of their income- 
If one cannot give money, one can work for the Church. 
Everybody can give something in their lives, either money 
or time. None of us think often enough of Christ. As 
one lady said at the Triennial, "Most of us think of Christ 
at Communion, but we go home and forget all about him 
for the rest of the day." Have him in our minds all day 
long. Try for closer companionship with Christ, as Bish- 
op Darst is always urging. Just work, we officers, to 
have our whole Diocese on fire for God; then, when one 
has reached that state of feeling, as I said before, the 
money part will take care of itself. If the women are in 
earnest, the lukewarm husbands will be ashamed of their 
indifference; and some day the wife's enthusiasm, and de- 
votion to her Church will be transferred to her husband, 
and the growing sons and daughters. Then the whole 
family will be laborers in God's beautiful vineyard- Let 
us feel "the sense of membership to our Church," and let 
our example influence and fire their enthusiasm. 

Emphasize the Stewardship plan of dividing one's time, 
so much for sleep, so much for work, so much time for 
pleasure, and so forth- In this division, if there is not 
time for Church work, cut out some of the play, give up 
more parties, but never miss the Church meetings. Feel 
that it is more important to keep that engagement than 
any party or dance. Let your Woman's Auxiliary come 
first.. Show your Lord how much you love him by never 
failing to meet an appointment with him. 

Then on this same subject, urge the reading of the Rev. 



B. T. Kemerer's book, "Christian Stewardship," which is 
so close to this subject. 

Third Article. United Parish Effort- This is also 
linked with the second point. Our spiritual understand- 
ing, our prayers, and greater consecration will teach us 
how to work in harmony with our minister, and our church 
associates, and our Diocese. We must not be too critical, 
too sensitive, to feel too easily that we are misunderstood, 
or not appreciated, or slighted. We are working for God 
and Christ, and any falling back on our part, through 
petty injury, will set back the great forward movement 
that our Church is now trying to bring about so earnestly 
to make Christ's Kingdom here on earth. 

Fourth Article. The Rural and Foreign-born Problem. 
There is such a wonderful opportunity for work in the 
rural field. A vast subject right in itself. We cannot 
flrge enough the study for this year of the book entitled, 
"Beyond City Limits." We must convince our people that 
the farmer is of vital importance. He, with his crops, is 
linked with our national prosperity and the salvation of 
cur country- He lays the foundation for industry and 
commerce through the abundance of his harvests. We 
must show our people that the farmer and his family 
must be brought to the Church; and, with his prosperity, 
he is to have better home conditions, higher ideals, and a 
more religious life for himself and his family. We can- 
not emphasize enough the fundamental value of rural life 
to our country and our church- Help to continue the life 
on the farm but make it easier, more comfortable, and 
more ideal. Make the farm so attractive that those who 
have left the farm for the city will be lured back to the 
former, and others will follow suit. Emphasize that Rome, 
Greece, France, and Germany, all fell when the healthy 
agricultural pursuits were abandoned for city work and 
pleasures. 

Fifth Article. Concerning closer relationship with the 
Missionaries in the field, and at home. These missionaries 
are so gentle, so appealing, and yet so graceful, as we 
recall them sitting on the platform, at New Orleans, the 
night when, at the great meeting, Mr. Lewis B. Franklin 
announced the amount of the U. T- 0. Yes, let us have a 
closer relationship with these missionaries. When they 
are on furlough, ask them to come to our meetings, talk 
with them — they often get discouraged- Let us remem- 
ber them at Christmas with a little gift or card, or send 
their Mission children small gifts from the Auxiliary mem- 
bers at our meeting on Alaska, St. Peter's Auxiliary, 
Washington, N. C, collected toys for Nenana, Anvik, and 
Eagle. If we have a few moments leisure, let us write a 
few lines to those we have met. As Mrs. Staton sug- 
gested, WTite the name of one of our missionaries on the 
U. T. O- box; and, whenever our eyes glance on that name, 
say a little prayer for that missionary. Perhaps a kind 
word from us or a card will show that missionary that we 
appreciate her; and she will feel that her work is really 
worth while. In this connection, urge the subscribing to 
and reading of The Spirit of Missions, and so learn to get 
acquainted with these workers- 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



13 



Sixth Article. Lastly, the Peace Program. How close 
that, too, ought to be to our hearts. It is a subject which 
just now seems to have many discouraging points. The 
bright outlook of the New Year has faded somewhat. Re- 
member, however, that the Rotary Clubs all over the 
country are championing the cause of Peace. They are 
a big body of splendid men; and we, with them, must help 
to "weave the fabric of Peace," and to help accomplish 
this "practical idealism" that they are stressing- On this 
subject there is a book, "Tlie Search for Peace," for the 
Auxiliary study classes. Right here I wish to mention 
the magazine "Asia," published every month, in New York 
City, which is so earnestly striving to promote Interna- 
tional Good Will. 

I have not mentioned work with the foreign born. 
There are so few foreigners here in North Carolina that 
we must leave that work to New England, New York, and 
the West. 

How can we help with the Message? Let us answer 
principally, as individuals- Watch every opportunity. We 
know how some women never fail to take advantage of a 
dress bargain sale at some store. Let us women of the 
Church watch out, as keenly as that "bargain-seeker," to 
put over some part of the Message. Whenever there is 
a meeting or a gathering, or even a few people of our 
church, watch out to speak a few words on some part of 
the Message. Just a little interpretation here and there 
will do more than to talk about the Message as a whole. 
Show to the individual her Christian obligations. Point 
out to her that her only legitimate excuse for not working 
for her church can be little children at home, or relations 
who are ill, or infirm, who need her care- Point out to 
those who have house- work that they must put on a little 
more steam, and hurry up with their work. Surely where 
there is a will, there is a way to work for God; and the 
love and faith of us Christians can be shown by our self- 
denying Christian life. 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE NOTES. 



NEWS OF GOOD SHEPHERD CHURCH, WILMING- 
TON, N. C. 



Sunday, October 3rd, was Rally Day at Good Shepherd 
Church School, and Sunday, October 10th, was Promotion 
Day, at which time seven children were promoted from 
the Beginners Department to the Primary Department. 
In the afternoon of the same date the annual Little Help- 
er's Service was held in the church by the rector- The 
choir and the program was provided by the children of the 
Church School. During Mr. Gibble's talk the little chil- 
dren in the Beginners Department brought objects to him 
which represented the things for which the Little Helper's 
Offering is going. One brought a doll in a bed, another a 
model of a font, made by one of the Church School boys, 
and another a Japanese doll. 

Two Little Helpers received their promotion certificates 
to the Beginners Department and were welcomed by one 
of the Church School children. 

The Parochial Kindergarten which opened September 
26th, is now in full swing with thirty-two children enrolled. 
They spend three happy hours five days of each week 
singing, playing and working- 

— The Parish Worker. 



The Best Thanksgiving. 

Thanksgiving Day is Thompson Orphanage Day in the 
Churches throughout North Carolina, when each man, wo- 
man and child in our Church is asked to share his or her 
abundance with these lovable little ones, who without our 
help would be hungry, homeless and sadly neglected. 

The love and tenderness of Christ must be ministered 
to them by our hands. This duty comes to each of us as 
something much finer and sweeter than a mere duty; it 
comes as a rare privilege to do it unto Him and to pur- 
chase for ourselves the smiles of grateful childhood, the 
blessing of innocence protected, the happiness that come 
singing into the life of him or her who follows the prompt- 
ings of love and generosity and the example of our Lord 
Himself. 

Large Offering Greatly Needed. 

The fine new buildings which your generosity has pro- 
vided for the comfort and well being of the children will 
not feed and clothe them, and this generous giving to the 
building program has cut off some contributions to the 
current fund. A wrong impression obtains among some 
people that because of these fine new buildings and equip- 
ment the Orphanage has all the money it needs for all 
purposes. 

The true condition of affairs is that at present, thirty 
days from Thanksgiving Day, the treasurer of the cur- 
rent fund has a little over $500.00 with which to meet a 
monthly expense of over .$3,000.00. 

Moreover all through the year there is a steadily wid- 
ening gap between the expense and the receipts. In al- 
most every month there is a large deficit of expenditures 
over receipts which would cause a constantly increasing 
indebtedness, were it not for the reserves stored up by 
the Thanksgiving offering. Even so last fall it was ne- 
cessary to borrow money before Thanksgiving, and this 
year the same thing seems unavoidable. It is earnestly 
hoped that this year the Thanksgiving offering will be 
large enough to enable the Orphanage to go through the 
coming year without borrowing. 

Ca^h Contributions Received From East Carolina, Sept. 
24, to Oct. 27, 1926. 

Wilmington, Miss Wilhelmina Harlow, $3.00; Winton, 
St. John's Sunday School, $10.00. 

Contributions in Kind. 

Wilmington, Miss Eliza Munds, sweater for Columbia 
Cummings. 

New Bern, Girls Friendly Society, winter outfit for 
Clara Bell Curtis. 

St. Ann's Guild, St. John's Wilmington, box containing 
fourteen dresses and other clothing. 



CHUiRCH KALENDAR NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1926. 



Date on label shows when your subscription expires. 
Help us avoid deficit by sending in remittance promptly. 



"O live ye by the Kalendar, 

And with the good ye dwell; 

The Spirit that came down on them. 

Will Lighten you as well." — Bishop Coxe. 

Nov. 7— 23rd Sunday after Trinity (Green) 

14— 24th Sunday after Trinity (Green) 

21 — Sunday next before Advent (Green) 

25 — Thanksgiving Day (White) 

28— 1st Sunday in Advent (Violet) 

30— S. Andrew, Apostle (Red) 

Dec. 5 — 2nd Sunday in Advent. (Violet) 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Young People's Department 

MISS BILLIE MELICK, Editor of Department 



I 



THE YOiUTH IN EAST CAROLINA ARE MOVING! 
WILL THE OLDER PEOPLE HELP? 



(By MISS ANN MILTON ,Field Secretary). 

With the distribution of a Hand Book of the Young Peo- 
ple's Service League in East Carolina, plans for the year 
have gone to the rectors, members and councilors of the 
League. The older church members, however, will not get 
news of us in this way, and to tell them what their young 
people are doing, this article is offered. 

Aims. The aims of the Service League are as simple 
and comprehensive as the young people's desire to should- 
er their share of the church's responsibility- They are 
best expressed by the Five Rules of Membership: 

I. Rule of Prayer: 

To pray daily for the church, church school, and God's 
blessing on the Young People's Service League. 

II- Rule of Worship: 

To attend at least one service of the church on Sunday, 
to attend the church school, and to read a portion of the 
Bible every day. 

III. Rule of Service: 

Study and work in the Five Fields of Service. 

IV. Rule of Fellowship: 

To be friendly and courteous to others at all times- 

V. Rule of gifts: 

To give to God regularly each week something which 
has cost me an effort, and to share with others the privi- 
leges I have received. 

These Five Rules are practiced in the church's Five 
Fields of Service: parish, community, diocese, nation, and 
world. 

Division of Work. The work of each individual League 
is carried on by five committees, or by combinations of the 
five where membership is very small. Every member 
serves on one of these committees, — Program, Member- 
ship, Social, Finance or Service. 

Programs. The program committee is responsible for 
one of the most important features of Service League 
life. From the Handbook they get model programs and 
suggested topics for building programs of their own- The 
subjects cover mission study, practical questions of .Chris- 
tian conduct, arising from our own experience, questions 
and information about church life and work, musical pro- 
grams, simple pageants to be presented by League mem- 
bers, special talks of community interest by members or 
invited speakers, seasonal programs and business meet- 
ings. 

The social, too, is a regular event in league programs, 
for fellowship among the members and with outsiders who 
are invited in. In arranging programs, the committee is 
encouraged to follow some regular system, as rector's 
night, mission study night, discussion night, etc., accord- 
ing to the desire of individual Leagues- The Five Fields 
are covered in planning programs by giving information 
or introducing discussions about events in each field. 

It is hard to find programs that are constructive, within 
our reach, and vitally interesting to us. To stimulate 
good original programs, a contest is going to be held for 
the best program or original pageant by any Service Lea- 



gue in the Diocese. 

Service for the Various Fields. The remaining four 
committees work out services for the various fields. For 
the parish, altar guilds may be provided; church grounds 
cared for; church worship books mended; parish libraries 
started or contributed to; church school teachers furnish- m 
ed; and help given at any church function or entertain- 
ment where it is asked- 

In the community, charitable institutions may be visited 
with gifts of books, magazines, flowers, or entertainment 
by a special program; local drives may be helped; or other 
organizations of young people assisted. 

The work for the Diocese is especially centered on the 
summer training camp. Small furnishings for Diocesan 
Mission Chapels, contributions through the church periodi- 
cal club for the Diocesan field, and Christian nurture ma- 
terial collected for Diocesan missions help to complete ser- 
vice in this third field. 

The nation and world are harder nuts to crack, since 
small services seem lost in such big fields- But the com- 
mittees are finding ways of usefulness even here. We can 
collect school books for missions in great need of them, 
correspond with young people in foreign mission stations, 
hold special prayers for our missionaries, engage in 
Christmas box work, send magazines and papers througlk» 
the C. P. C., and keep ourselves informed by the needs and 
work in these fields^ especially that by young people. 

The Year's Outlook. This year the special objective of 
the Diocesan Y. P. S. L. is a summer training camp. Bis- 
hop Darst has sent us a challenge to realize an old dream, 
and we mean to fulfill his charge. In these training camps 
the experience of league members and leaders is put into 
forms, serviceable to the whole organization. Here two 
weeks of intensive training in methods and ideals are off- 
ered for the following year's work. We need a camp, we 
want one, and we expect to have it this coming summer! 

Wet Blankets Quench the Fire. The young people are 
beginning this year with high hopes of putting- our Dioces- 
an Y. P. S. L. in the place it should rightfully hold. We 
are going to put our enthusiasm and best' energies into our 
work, but we know that we cannot succeed in any large 
measure without the sympathy and leadership of older 
church people. We need encouragement, guidance and 
co-operation in our efforts to shoulder, as best we can, 
problems of the church which has so long cared for us. 
Indifference is the wettest blanket we encounter, discour- 
agement one of our most dangerous enemies. We are 
asking for the support of every church member, of every 
grown-up interested in young people. Are you going to 
give it to us ? 



HERE AND THERE IN THE DIOCESE. 



St. John's Guild of Winton, N, C, recently had the walls 
of the Church painted, the floor stained and carpeted. In 
as much as no repairs have been made for sometime, the 
congregation is thankful for the improvements made by 
the Guild- 

* * * 

East Carolina is on the Honor Roll of dioceses that 
have paid the percentage of their budget quota due to 
October 1st. The Honor Roll contains 21 names this time 
in comparison with 12 last year- This is the time to ar- , 
range for "Pay-up-Sundays" and other methods of col- M 
lecting over-due pledges, v^Tites Mr. Lewis B. Franklin, ' 
treasurer of the National Council, and we trust that you 
agree with him. 



•'\ 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



15 



Convocation of Colored Workers 

REV. R. I. JOHNSON, Editor of Department 
New Bern, N. C. 



ANNIVERSARY PLANNED FOR ST. CYPRIAN'S. 



Plans are being made for the celebration of the sixtieth 
anniversary of St. Cyprian's Church, New Bern, during 
the week of Thanksgiving. Several local and diocesan 
ministers will participate in the series of services which 
will extend through the week. A feature will be the ordi- 
nation to the Priesthood of the Rev. Augustus Hawkins of 
St. Ignatius Mission, Williamston, by the Rt. Rev. H. B. 
Delaney, assisted by the visiting clergy. The Anniversary 
Bazaar of the Parochial Society will be held also during 
the week. The Thanksgiving sermon will be preached by 
Bishop Delaney. 



CLERGY CONFERENCE. 



On Thursday, October 14th, there was held a Conference 
'of the Clergy of the Colored Convocation. The following 
were present: Dean Heritage, Revs. S. N. Griffith, 0. J. 
McLeod, G. H. Cautien, J. F. Holder, A. Hawkins and R. I. 
Johnson, of the Colored Clergy, and the Revs. W. R. Noe, 
executive Secretary, and Alexander Miller, Chairman of 
the Diocesan Committee on the state of the Church. 

The Conference was opened by Dean Herritage with 
Hymn, Creed and Prayers, after which Mr. Miller was in- 
troduced and spoke, in a striking manner, of the matter of 
dropped members and the necessity of sending in the 
names of the same to his committee as ordered by resolu- 
tion of the annual Convention. The Clergy promised to 
give the matter immediate attention. This matter brought 
up many related subjects which were interestingly dis- 
cussed. 

Mr. Miller was followed by Mr. Noe who presented the 
plans for the fall program activities. His address was 
most illuminating to all, and showed the necessity of each 
congregation doing its utmost to meet its apportionment. 
The plainness and directness with which Mr. Noe outlined 
and discussed each phase of the work, especially the Color- 
ed Work, was most helpful to all present. As a result of 
this Conference which was well worth while, it is to be 
hoped that the quotas of all the Churches will be fully 
paid before the close of the year. The necessity of doing 
this was never more urgent than now. 

Resolutions were adopted expressing pride in the work 
of Bishop Darst who, by the grace of God, has been called 
to such a great task in the General Church, and the de- 
termination of the Clergy present to do their humble part 
in "keeping the home fires burning." 

NEWS OF THE GENERAL CHURCH. 

The King of England is having a silver alms basin made 
to present to the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, in New 
York. 



The high altar in the Cathedral in Seoul, Korea, conse- 
crated in 1926, is the gift of the English Archbishops and 
twelve other Bishops of England and Scotland. 



Two of our clergy in Manila have started a course of 
theological training, looking toward a native Filipino min- 
istry. They have three students as a beginning. 



The Princeton-Dartmouth hockey game is to be played 
as a benefit for the Seamen's Church Institute of New 
York, on January 3, 1927, at Madison Square Garden, New 
York. 



MR. NOE HOLDS MISSION AT LAKE PHELPS. 



(By the Rev. C, E. Williams.) 
Sunday night, October 3rd, brought to a close one of the 
most successful missions ever held in this field. This was 
Mr. Noe's second visit to the mission and every one seem- 
ed delighted to have him again this year. The services 
were well attended each night. Through the loyal co-op- 
eration of the good people of Christ Church, Creswell, the 
music was splendid. 

Through Mr. Noe's splendid sermons and his ever ready 
sympathy he has awakened the people of this community 
to a real need of Christ. There will be a nice Confirma- 
tion Class ready when the bishop comes to us in Nevem- 
ber. 



GET TOGETHER MEETING AT ROPER. 



The ladies of Columbia, Creswell, Roper and Plymouth, 
met in St. Luke's Church, Roper, on October 12th, for 
their seventh meeting. The meeting was opened with the 
reading of Morning Prayer by Dr. Drane. Miss Ida Pea- 
cock, the president, called the meeting to order; and, 
after the usual routine of business. Dr. Drane gave an 
inspiring talk on "The progress of the Church in East 
Carolina during the past fifty years." 

At one o'clock the ladies of St. Luke's entertained the 
guests with a delightful luncheon. This was greatly en- 
joyed by every one present. 

In the afternoon the Rev. C. E. Williams gave a talk on 
"The Bishops' Ciusade and its relation to the women of 
the Church." 

The feature of the day was a talk on the subject, "Some 
Suggestions," -by Mrs. Staton. 

This was one of the best meetings we have ever held 
in this district. Every one went away feeling happier 
and better for having been there. 



[ 



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[ HOME FURNISHERS and FUNERAL DIRECTORS | 

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When passing through Ayden come in and let us | 

show you our stock and quote prices. I 



The Peoples Savings Bank 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

Will welcome your business. Four per cent Interest 
Compounded Quarterly allowed on all deposits. 
23 Years Old. Capital and Surplus $250,000.00. 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



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OWN A SUMMER HOME at CAROLINA BEACH 

Carolina Beach is on the Main Land. A Beach that you can drive your Automobile to the Water's 
edge. A good hard road from Wilmington. A new modern hotel now under construction that will be 
completed for the season of 1926. Lots are sold on reasonable terms and as an investment they are ideal. 
Information gladly given. Call or write any authorized representative. 

CAROLINA BEACH CORPORATION 

OWNERS AND DEVELOPERS OF 



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Offices at CAROLINA BEACH, N. C. 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



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OFFICERS:— S. C. Ogburn, President; W. F. SchafFner, Vice-President; W. W. Walsh, Vice-President; 

E. P. Yates, Vice-President; E. D. Turner, Secretary-Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS:— S. C. Ogburn, S. C. Clark, A. V. Nash, W. F. Shaffner, E. P. Yates, E. D. Turner, W. W. 

Walsh. 
J. L. BECTON, C. E., Wilmington, N. C, Engineer in charge of development. 
REFERENCES: — Any Bank or Mercantile Agency. 



M 



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Norfolk-Southern Railroad 



Passenger Schedules Effective May 2, 1926, Plymouth, N C. 



Leave. DAILY. 

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12:30 P. Ml — Norfolk and intermediate points. Parlor 

car. 
4:30 A. M. — Norfolk and intermediate points. Sleeping 
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For tickets, Pullman reservations and other informa- 
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Plymouth, N. C. 



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"%rt*|tra'il)^t-t|rarrt{)$ay cDmrlKeu2Z:i7 




PARTIAL CONTENTS 




Plans for the Bishops' Crusade 
Crusade Mass Meetings 
List of Diocesan Crusaders 
Wilmington Convocation Meets 
Dr. Drane's 50th Anniversary 
The Message 
Financial Statement 

Regarding Leaderless Groups of 
Young People 




December, 1920 



O 



V 



Published by the Diocese of East Carolina at Ayden, N. C. 




THE MISSION HERALD. 



St. Mary^s School 

A JUNIOR COLLEGE ' 

Rev. WARREN W. WAY, Rector. 



An Episcopal School for Girls. Four years High School and two 
years College Courses. Accredited. Special courses: Music, Art, 
Expression, Home Economics, Business. 

MODERN EQUIPMENT— 20-ACRE CAMPUS. 

Advent session opened Sept. 15, 1926. For catalogue address 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 



ALTARS,PULPITS,LECTEriNS,FONTS,FABRICS,EMBROIDERIES.||| 

Memorial Tablets, Stained Glass Windows. ly 



56 WEST 8TH ST. NEW YORK 




A MEETING OF GREAT IMPORTANCE! 



A meeting of the department of Missions and Church Extension, was 
held in St, Paul's Church, Greenville, N. C, at 2:00 P. M , Sunday, Novem- 
ber 21, 1926. 

The meeting was opened with prayer by Rev. J. E. W. Cook. Mr. G. B. 
Elliott, vice-chairman, stated the purpose of the meeting and called atten- 
tion to the fact that approximately $23,000 remained to be paid to the Dio- 
cese by the Parishes and Missions between this date and December 31, and 
asked the co-cperation of the Associate Members by taking by taking the 
matter up with their Parish authorities and seeking to have remittante 
made to the Treasurer between this date and December 31, as the same be- 
came due. By request, Mr. Noe read statement of the standing of the 
Parishes and Missions represented at the meeting. 

After discussion, the following resolution, offered by Mr. George Royall 
and duly seconded, was adopted: 

Resolved, That every member of the Department present return to his 
Parish and take up personally with his Vestry and Treasurer and endeavor 
to have his Treasurer remit to the Diocesan Treasuier the amount due by 
his Parish as soon as possible; certainly before December 31. 

Resolved, further, That the chairman be directed to report this resolu- 
tion to other members of the department, representing- other Parishes and 
Missions not present, and to request similar action by them. 

Upon motion of Mr. J. R. Pinkham it was 

Resolved, That the department hold meetings of this character at some 
central point in the Diocese each year. 

There was full discussion of the situation in the Diocese generally and 
explanation of the conditions in certain Parishes, after which the meeting 
adjourned. 

The following were present: Messrs. H. G. Burton, Ayden; C. R. Nick- 
erson, Belhaven; T. H. Partrick, Clinton; H. G. Walker, Creswell; W. G. 
Gaither, Elizabeth City; Geo. C. Royall, Goldsboro; H. W. White, G^-een- 
ville; G. V. Cowper, Kinston; E. K. Bishop, New Bern; John G. Bragaw, and 
J. R. Pinkham, Jr., Washington; H. F. Wilder, J. H. Hinton, Geo. B. Elliott, 
and Thomas D. Meares, Wilmington; E. C. Beaman, Farmville; Geo. Cape- 
harte, Avoca; G. H. Cox, Robersonville; Rev. James E. W. Cook, Greenville; 
Rev. Stephen Gardner, Washington; Rev. Walter R. Noe, Wilmington; Dr. 
W. W. Dawson, Griffon; Dr. R. W. Smith, Hertford; and Dr. C. T. Sawyer, 
Windsor, N. C 



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D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 



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Embroideries, Clerical Suits, 
Silks, Cloths, Fringes. 

HATS, RABATS, COLLARS 

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Michigan has a diocesan policy and 
program specifically for Boys' Work. 




Carleton College, Northfield, Min- 
nesota, with an enrollment of 815 
(from 23 states and 7 foreign coun- 
tries), has 112 Episcopal Church stu- 
dents, about evenly divided between 
men and girls. Our Church work 
there is under the direction of the 
Rev. Dr. Houghton, rector of All 
Saints Church and a member of the 
College faculty. 



The Mission Herald. 



Vol. XL. 



AYDEN, N. C, DECEMBER, 1926. 



No. 12. 



PLANS FOR THE BISHOPS' CRUSADE IN THE DIOCESE 

OF EAST CAROLINA 



ALL THE CLERGY WILL CONDUCT MISSIONS 



Dear Brethren of the Clergy: — After most careful de- 
liberation, we are sending you a schedule plan for the pre- 
paration and the conduct of the Bishops' Crusade in East 
Carolina. We have tried to make our plan as simple as 
possible in the interest of thoroughgoing efficiency. We 
believe that we are asking nothing that is not necessary 
for the realization of the great objectives of this move- 
ment in the General Church, and with only such modifica- 
tions as local necessity may require, we are asking, most 
earnestly, that you will carry out these plans from start 
to finish in accordance with our recommendations. 

The Bishops' Crusade originated in East Carolina, as 
did the Nation-wide Campaign for the Church's Mission, 
in which forward movement East Carolina has been in the 
van from the beginning. Our Bishop is the National 
leader of the Crusade. We have voted his services to the 
General Church, and in Convention, Conference, and Con- 
vocation have pledged ourselves and our congregations to 
carry on, in every way, during his absence from our midst. 
We cannot fail on the human side of our part in 
this movement, without proving recreant to our promises, 
our obligations, and our opportunities. We must carry 
• on, meeting every claim upon our loyalty four square. 

You will note that in addition to the plans recommend- 
ed for the period of intensive prepartion, beginning with 
St. Andrew's Day and the conduct of the Crusade by the 
National Crusaders in the three centers selected by the 
Bishop, we have undertaken to assign every clergyman in 
the diocese to at least one point, in which he will be Dio- 
cesan Crusader, and that as many parishes and missions 
in the diocese will be reached as the number of our cleri- 
cal force permits. We trust that each clergyman will 
accept his appointment to his designated field, as of the 
nature of a draft for service. 

Digests of the messages of the Crusade for the six 
evenings appointed by the National Commission will be 
sent you in due time from the Diocesan Office, as well as 
such other literature as may be necessary to carry out the 
plans recommended. 

In conclusion your Commission would once more call to 
your mind the ringing challenge to the Church of our 
Bishop: 

"Our object is to bring to the Church a fresh realiza- 
tion of its power and mission; to kindle again in the 
hearts of its members a passion for the souls of men; to 
arouse the Church from its lethargy and send it out clad 
in the shining armour of a great faith to complete the 
task committed to its hands; to sound a note of a sacri- 



ficial devotion to a cause immeasurably bigger than our- 
selves." 

May God grant us powers equal to our tasks! 
Clarence 0. Pardo, Ch'm. Mrs. Guy Small, 
J. F. Bynum, P. D. Dean, 

James E. W. Cook, Stephen Gardner 

G. P. Hill, G. H. Madara 

Alexander Miller, W. H. Milton, 

J C. B. Ehringhaus, George C. Royall, 

John R. Tolar, Jr. Mrs. H. J. MacMillan. 

Diocesan Commission on Evangelism. 
Wilmington, N. C, November 17, 1926. 



HOW TO PREPARE FOR THE CRUSADE. 



St. Andrew's Day. 

(Tuesday, November 30th.) 

Should be observed as a day of penitence, prayer and 
Spiritual preparation for the Crusade. 

Corporate Communion of the men and boys — early morn- 
ing. 

Corporate Communion of the women and girls — 10:00 
A. M. 

Continuous prayer in each parish and mission by 
groups, arranged according to a time-schedule from 11:00 
A. M. to 6:00 P. M. 

"Suggestions for Prayer" and other necessary litera- 
ture put out by the National Commission will be furnished 
in due time from Diocesan Headquarters. 

Devotional service of prayer and praise, with a ser- 
mon on Personal Responsibility for Evangelism from the 
text: "He first findeth his own brother; he brought him 
to Jesus." 8:00 P. M. 

Four Sundays in Advent. 

Sermons by each clergyman on topics furnished by the 
National Commission, at some hour of each Sunday in 
every parish and mission as far as is possible. 

It is suggested by the Diocesan Commission that rectori 
of neighboring parishes effect an exchange one Sunday 
in this season for the purpose of carrying the message of 
the Crusade. 

New Year's Eve. 
(Friday before Epiphany.) 

The parish Church should be kept open, if possible, 
throughout the day and each communicant at some time 
during the day come to the Church for a few minutes of 
meditation and prayer. At least one service should be 
held during the day. The Diocesan Commission recom- 
mends a celebration of the Holy Communion at 12:00 P. 
M., with a meditation on the Communion Oblation: "And 
here^we offer and present unto Thee, O Lord, ourselves." 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



CRUSADE MASS MEETINGS. 



Wilmington, January 23-28, inclusive. Crusaders: Rt. 
Rev. Theodore Du Bose Bratton, LL. D., Bishop of Missis- 
sippi; and Rev. H. F. Kloman, Cumberland, Maryland. 

Elizabeth City, January 30 to February 4, inclusive. 
Crusaders: Rev. Pembroke W. Reed, Richmond, Va.; and 
Rev. H. F. Kloman, Cumberland, Maryland. 

Washington, February 6-11, inclusive. Crusaders: Rt. 
Rev. Frederick Foote Johnson, D. D., Bishop of Missouri, 
and Rev. Pembroke W. Reed, Richmond, Va. 

All the clergy and selected representatives from the 
men, women and young people of each parish and mission 
should attend one of these meetings. Entertainment will 
be provided. In some cases it may be found helpful to 
designate certain days for certain gioups and make a 
special effort to promote attendance from that section on 
that day, arranging train or automobile parties from 
these congregations. 



DIOCESAN CRUSADERS. 



Diocesan C-usaders will carry the Crusade as far as 
possible into every parish and mission of the Diocese. 
They are drafted for service in the same way as the Na- 
tional Crusaders. Subjects for the six sermons of the Cru- 
sade, with digest of each message recommended will be 
furnished in due time by Diocesan Headquarters. 

Note: The Dean of the Convention of Colored Church 
workers has been requested to select the Crusaders for 
the parishes and missions of his Convocation. 

February 14-20, Inclusive. 

Atkinson, St. Thomas', Rev. Howard Alligood. tl 

Ayden, St. James*, Rev. E. W. Halleck, 

Aurora, Holy Cross, Rev. C. E. Williams. 

Bath, St. Thomas', Rev. H D. Cone. 

Beaufort, St. Paul's, Rev. F. D. Dean. 

Belhaven, St. James', Rev. G. F. Cameron. s^' 

Chocowinity, Trinity, Rev. H. M. Green. # 

Clinton, St. Paul's, Rev. J. Hartley, Ph. D. 

Creswell, St. David's, Rev. A. Miller. p' 

Edenton, St. Paul's, Rev. S. Gardner. 

Farmville, Emmanuel, Rev. G. F. Hill. 

Feyetteville, St. John's, Rev. J. E. W. Cook. 

Gatesville, St. Mary's, Rev. E. T. Jillson. 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's, Rev.. G. H. Madara. 

Greenville, St. Paul's, Rev. C. 0. Pardo. 

Grifton, St. John's, Rev. A. J. Mackie. .) 4 

Hertford, Holy Trinity, Rev. A. Boogher. 

Lake Landing, St. George's, Rev. T. N. Brincefield. 

New Bern, Christ Church, Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D. 

Plymouth, Grace, Rev. W. R. Noe. ,■ 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's, Rev. J. N. Bynum. jf 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's Rev. G. W. Lay, D. C. L. .? 

Winton, St. John's, Rev. J. B. Gibble. .f 

Woodville, Grace, Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D. ;, 

Warsaw, Calvary, Rev. Preston Barr. 

North West, All Souls', Rev. S. E. Matthews. 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas', Rev. W. 0. Cone. 

Sunbury, St. Peter, Rev. H. G England. 

February 21-27, Inclusive. " ' 

Hamilton, St. Martin's, Rev. C. E. Williams. 
Hope Mills, Christ, Rev. A. J. Mackie. 
Jessama, "Zion, Rev. G. F. Hill. 



Kinston, St. Mary's, Rev. C. 0. Pardo. 
Roper, St. Luke's, Rev. E. T. Jillson. 
Seven Springs, Holy Innocents', Rev. J. N. Bynum. 
Southport, St. Philip's, Rev. H. D. Cone. 
Williamston, Advent, Rev. E. W. Halleck. 
Windsor, St. Thomas', Rev. A. Miller. 
Burgaw, St. Mary's, Rev. S. Gardner. 
Columbia, St. Andrew's, Rev. G. H. Madara. 
Fairfield, All Saints', Rev. H. Alligood. 
Faison, St. Gabriel's, Rev. W. R, Noe. 
Lumberton, Trinity, Rev, G. W. Lay, D. C. L. 
Swan Quarter, Calvary, Rev. H. G. England. 
Trenton, Grace, Rev, G, F. Cameron. 
Whiteviile, Grace, Rev. J. E. W. Cook. 
Pollocksville, Mission, Rev, T, N, Brincefield, 
Morehead City, St. Andrew's. Rev. A. Boogher. 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's, Rev. F. D. Dean. 
Sladesville, St. John's, Rev. H. M. Green. 

NOTE Offerings will be taken at all of the services. 
These offerings will be applied; (1) To the traveling 
and other necessary expenses of the Crusaders; (2) To 
the local publicity expenses; (3) The balance to be sent to 
the Treasuier of the Diocesan Commission to be forward- 
ed to the Treasurer of the National Commission. 



MR. GEO. C. ROYALL OF GOLDSBORO, ADDRESSES 
MEN'S CLUB OF ST. JOHN'S, FAYETTEVILLE, 

N. C. 



On Thursday evening, October 28th, the Men's Club of 
St. John's Church, Fayetteville, N. C, met to hear the re- ; 
ports of the activities of the various committees and to 
listen to a speech by Mr. George G. Royall, of Goldsboro, 
who is in charge of the branch of the work in this diocese, 
represented by the men's clubs. 

Every committee made a report indicating that the men 
have the work well in hand and the pains submitted show- J 
ed that the influence of the church for good will be great- 1 
ly increased. I 

After a bountiful supper had been served by the ladies 
of the church, Mr. Royall was graciously introduced by his 
friend and co-worker in the diocese for many years, Maj. 
B, R. Huske. 

Mr. Royall commended the splendid organization of the 
club, acknowledged that the friendship and example of 
Maj. Huske had been of great assistance to him in his 
work and then made a thoughtful address, his subject be- ; 
ing "The Bishops' Crusade." I 

Perhaps the strongest points made by the speaker were 
first, the necessity of every member of the church attend- 
ing at least one service every Sunday and second, the 
great and frequently unexpected influence exerted by lay- 
men, citing several instances that had come under his 
observation where things done by laymen had brought 
about rather remarkable results. 

Mr. John Dewey, president of the club, who presided 
at the meeting warmly thanked Mr. Royall for his speech. 
Mr. Royall responded by saying that the organization of 
the men of St. John's church and the plans made for the 
furtherance of the work of the Bishops' Crusade, especial- 
ly by one of the leading and one of the oldest parishes 
in the diocese, would be an inspiration to him and an en- 
couragement for the continuance of his own work with 
the men's clubs. 



Subscribe to the MISSION HERALD. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



WILMINGTON CONVOCATION MEETS IN WHITE- 
VILLE. 



Rev. Archer Boogher Preaches the Opening Sermon. 

(Reported by the REV. G. F. CAMERON.) 

The Wilming1;on Convocation held one of its most suc- 
cessful meeting's in Grace Episcopal Church, Whiteville, 
N. C, November 10th and 11th. The Convocation began 
Tuesday evening' at seven-thirty o'clock with sermon by 
the Rev. Archer Boogher, rector of St. John's Church, 
Fayetteville, N. C. Mr. Boogher used the text, "Why 
seek ye a sign," and sounded a very high note of faith 
which, he said, must be an abiding part of every Chris- 
tian's life. 

At 7:30 A. M., Thursday morning, the service of the 
Holy Communion was celebrated by the Rev. Alexander 
Miller, rector of St. Paul's Church, Wilmington, N. C, as- 
sisted by the Rev. W. R. Noe, executive secretary. 

At 9:30 A. M., the Convocation was duly opened by the 
dean, the Rev. Alexander Miller, of Wilmington. Mr. 
Miller was re-elected dean for the next year, and the Rev. 
George W. Lay, D. C. L., of Beaufort, N. C, was re- 
elected secretary and treasurer. The meeting went at 
once into a very helpful discussion of the Bishops' Cru- 
sade. Every one present promised to enter whole-heart- 
edly into the great movement of evangelization that is 
about to start in East Carolina and throughout the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church in America. Resolution was 
telegraphed to Bishop Darst, Chairman of the National 
Commission on Evang-elism, Washington, D. C, assuring' 
him that he may depend upon the Wilmington Convoca- 
tion to fully support the national program on evangelism. 

At 1:00 P. M., a delightful luncheon was served to the 
Convocation in the Sunday School rooms of the West- 
minster Presbyterian Church by the women of the Bap- 
tist, Methodist, Presbyterian, and Episcopal churches. 

Thursday afternoon the clergy and Woman's Auxiliary, 
which before had been meeting separately, met in joint 
session. The Rev. W. R. Noe, of Wilmington, outlined in 
a most engaging manner the task that has been committed 
to the church in East Carolina. Reports were given by 
the heads of the various departments, directed by the 
president, Mrs. H. J. MacMillian, of Wilmington, who pre- 
sented the work in general. Mrs. T. A. McNeill, of Lum- 
berton, presented the educational work; Mrs. W. O. S. 
Sutherland, of Wilmington, the publicity work; Mrs. J. B. 
Cranmer, of Wilming-ton, the field department; Mrs. Swift 
Boatwright,"The Message"; Mrs. James G. Staton, of Will- 
iamston, the United Thank Offering; Mrs. S. P. Adams, 
president of the Wilmington Convocation, missions; Miss 
Ann Milton spoke on Young People's Work. The Rev. G. 
W. Lay, D. C. L., of Beaufort, gave an interesting and 
helpful lecture of religious education 

The Rev. W. H. Milton, D D., of St. James' Church, 
Wilmington, closed the Convocation with sermon on 
evangelism, making a fine appeal, and urging his hearers 
to help make the Bishops' Crusade successful in the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina. 

The following clergy were present: Rev. G. F. Cam- 
eron, of Ayden; Rev. Archer Boogher, of Fayetteville; 
Rev. Geo. W. Lay, D. C. L., of Beaufort; Rev. H, G. Eng- 
land, of Lumberton; Rev. Alexander Miller, Rev. W. R. 
Noe, and Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., of Wilmington. 
Messrs. J. Q. Beckwith, of Lumberton, and J. H. Hinton, 
of Wilmington, were also present. The following repre- 
sentatives of the Woman's Auxiliary were present: Mrs. 
Swift Boatwright, Mis. H. J. MacMillian, Mrs. Robert 



Calder, Mrs. J. B. Cranmer, Mrs. W. O. S. Sutherland, 
Miss Theo. Cantwell, Mrs. Arthur Belden, Miss Ann Mil- 
ton, Miss Mae B. French, Mrs. W. B. Pennypacker, Mrs. 
H. L. Prince, Mrs. Clarence Myers, Mrs. Marshall West- 
cott, Mrs. C. L. Spooner, Mrs. W. B. Daniels, Mrs. C. M. 
Murrin, Mrs. J. H. Sailings, Miss Florence Atwood, Mrs. 

A. J. Perry, Mrs. S. A. Ashe, Mrs. Warren Jones, Mrs. L. 

B. Pierce, Mrs. Joe H. Hinton, Mrs. W. R. Noe, Mrs. Alex- 
ander Miller, Mrs. Jas. Lyle, Mrs. Frank Harrell, Mrs. S. 
P. Adams, Mrs. Whitaker, of Wilmington; Mrs. Leighton 
Huske, Mrs. Samuel Tillinghast, Mrs. W. N. Tillinghast, 
Mrs. Schanck, Mrs. Robinson, of Fayetteville; Mrs. W. S. 
Davis, Miss Alice Adkins, Miss Carr, and Mrs. Davis, of 
Southport; Mrs. M. Robinson, Mrs. E. J. Marlowe, Mrs. 
J. Q. Beckwith, Mrs. T. A. McNeill, Mrs. Samuel Turner, 
of Luberston; Mrs. Wallace H. Huffines, of Hope Mills. 

The Convocation passed a resolution, expressing its 
profound gratitude for the unbounded hospitality of the 
congregation of Grace Church, and for the generous co- 
operation of the citizens and church people of Whiteville. 



A LAYMAN ON THE CRUSADE. 



"There is no need for a pessimistic attitude. Probably 
conditions in our Church are not different from those in 
other religious bodies. But facts ought to be faced, and 
it is a fact that the Church does not grow as it should, 
and that too many Christians seem satisfied to be nominal 
Christians, doing nothing for the extension of the knowl- 
edge of Christ. The average annual increase of the Church 
for the past five years, we are told, has been 16,654. If 
we apply the national birth and death rates to Church 
families, there should be a normal or natural growth of 
10,305, which means that in addition to taking care of 
our own we go outside of the Church and bring in only 
6,349 persons per year. If there are 7,833 parishes and 
missions in the United States, with average communicant 
lists of 150, it would take two parishes and one mission 
to add two communcants to our roll. From these figures 
it takes 184 persons 365 days to bring one person from 
the outside. And I don't think any argument is required 
to prove that such a condition is not in accordance with 
the expressed command of our Lord. 

"The Episcopal Church has much to offer. It has work 
for every one who is willing to work. Its whole genius is 
adapted to missionary effort. The Bishops' Crusade is 
intended to bring about the reconsecration to service by 
church members that will render it a living, working, pro- 
ducing body, to a degree not previously realized." — Mr. 
Leon C. Palmer in the Southern Churchman. 



LEGACY. 



By the will of Mrs. Sarah E. Wadsworth, the sum of 
$1,000 has been left to Christ Church Parish, New Bern, 
N. C. This, by previous action of the Vestry in relation 
to legacies of this nature, will go into the permanent funds 
of the Parish as the Sarah E. Wadsworth Fund, and the 
income will be used to augment the general funds of the 
Parish. This is a beautiful way to keep up one's interest 
in the work of the Church, though one goes on into the 
next world. — Christ Church Tidings. 



Give a year's subscription to the MISSION HERALD 
to your friend or relative for a wholesome and acceptable 
Christmas present. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 




/ir-ff7d. dy^^^^^ 



THE REV. ROBERT BRENT DRANE, D. D., CELE- 
BRATES FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY IN 
THE MINISTRY. 



(By the REV. G. F. CAMERON.) 
Edenton, the third oldest town in North Carolina, rich 
in folk lore and colonial history, the resting place of many 
of Carolina's illustrious dead, arose early Monday morn- 
ing, November 1st, 1926, to pay its respects and do hom- 
age to another of its famous citizens, the Rev, Robert 
Brent Drane, D. D., rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 
The occasion was the celebration of Dr. Drane's fiftieth 
year in the blessed ministry, all of which has been spent 
in Edenton, and also the 225th year of the founding of the 
parish of St. Paul's. 

The program of the day began with service in the old 
Church at eleven o'clock, when the Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount 
Cheshire, D. D., Bishop of the Diocese of North Carolina, 
preached on the subject of "The Church in North Carolina 
from 1876 to 1926," stating that the period was begun 
with confidence of hope and ends with high achievement, 
and concluded with the following: 

"I had thought that I should say something of our dear 
brother, the Rt. Rev. Robert Brent Drane, D. D., whom we 
are here to honor, and of his great father who was truly 
one of the noblest figures in the history of our Church in 
North Carolina. He was my God-father; so his son and I 
are brothers by spiritual affinity, and our mothers were 
sisters. From boyhood we grew up together; for a time, 
at least, in one household, a household which experienced 
in full measure the blessing spoken by the Psalmist: "Be- 
hold how good and pleasant it is for brethren to dwell to- 
gether in unity." We stand so close together that I can- 
not find it in my power to speak much of him; and here 
in his presence. But there is little need that I should 
speak. He has had but this one parish, and he has lived 
in this one parish for fifty years. And at the end of these 



fifty years he enjoys the confidence and the affection of the 
whole community, not because they have always agreed 
with him, but because they have found him always and in 
all thing-s honest, true, courageous, and good. They know 
him. They know that he is a faithful and diligent pastor 
and priest; and they know too that he is a man; and they 
like the combination. My father was the first clergy- 
man, v/ho, in North Carolina, served one parish for fifty 
years. Dr. Drane is another. 

He is the only clergyman in the state of North Caro- 
lina who was one of our clergy in 1876, and also in 1926. 
The only lay member of the Convention in 1876, and also 
in 1926, is our good brother, Mr. Robert R. Cotten. Mr. 
Samuel S. Nash was another, but not a member in 1926. 
I was in the convention in both years, a layman in 1876. 
We four connect these conventions, three of one family 
connection, and all four associated with Calvary church, 
Tarboro. 

As we look back over these fifty years, and miss so 
many noble and good, and note how time deals with us 
who a.e left, we are tempted to think: 

'How few, all weak and withered their force. 

Wait on the verge of dark eternity, 
Like stranded wreckg, the tide returning hoarse, 
To sweep them from our sight!' 
But we are not yet, I trust, quite "stranded wrecks." 
And certainly we know that it is no "dark eternity," 
which confronts us; but an eternity bright with the prom- 
ise and the smile of our heavenly Father!" 

At this service the Holy Communion was celebrated by 
the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Dart, D. D., Bishop of the Diocese 
of East Carolina, who also spoke briefiy of the deep af- 
fection of the people of East Carolina for Dr. Drane. 

At four o'clock in the afternoon there was a pageant 
entitled, "The Bells of Old St. Paul's," which portrayed 
the whole history of old St. Paul's, Edenton, from the be- 
ginning to the year 1926. It began with the far away 
bell of the early settlers, the organization of the first 
vestry of St. Paul's Parish — the oldest corporation in 
Noith Carolina — December 15th, 1701, and ended by voic- 
ing the note of honored achievement on November 1st, 
1926. It was well executed, the actors played their parts 
well; and in many places the spark of genius shone out. 
Nearly a thousand people, admirers of Dr. Drane, came 
to witness the pageant. Many times, as they watched it 
their eyes were filled with tears, and their hearts leaped 
with joy. They caught the spirit of old St. Paul's, as 
Edenton's exciting and noble history was re-enacted and 
they heard the v/hispering voices of their ancestors. The 
people of Edenton, more than others, know what St 
Paul's spirit is. They know that it keeps 

Watch o'er childhood's careless laughter, 
Watch o'er dull care following after, 
Watch o'er patriots' crimson vision, 
Watch o'er bright gay wedding bell, 
Watch o'er death's slow leaden knell, 
Watch o'er pain's long midnight vigil, 
Summer's sun and winter's bleak chill, 
Watch o'er vows to God and Heaven, 
O'er those who for the right have striven: 
Watch of St. Paul's cross-crowned spire — 
Holy watch that ne'er shall tire." 
(Bells of Old St. Paul's, by Theodosia W. Glenn.) 
All the people of Edenton love Dr. Drane, and the 
Church people of East Carolina very greatly esteem him. 
They have waited for years that they might give tangible 



THE MISSION HERALD. 




power of a Church tO' which the promise has 
been made, " The gates of hell shall not pre- 
vail against it." — Bishop Darst. 



PARISH PKEPARATION FOR THE 
BISHOPS' CRUSADE. 



ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, EDENTON, N. C. 

evidence of their affection. Members of all denomina- 
tions in Edenton joined tlieir forces in making All Saints' 
Day, November ]*t,192o, another red-letter day in the 
history of Edenton, and the celebiation was highly suc- 
cessful. The good women of the other Edenton churches 
served tables, and looked after the many details, that 
their sisters in St. Paul's might be free to look after the 
comfort of the visitors. The day's festivities ended with 
a love feast in St. Paul's Parish House. Everybody was 
filled with a spirit of most intense joy and happiness, and 
Dr. Drane, himself, though seventy-five years old, was 
one of the youngest and most hilarious. 

Handsome gifts were presented with loving tributes by 
Major B. R. Huske, of Fayetteville, in behalf of the lay- 
men of the diocese, and by Mrs. James G. Staton, in behalf 
of the women of the diocese. The Rt. Rev. Thomas C. 
Darst, D. D., Bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina, 
and the Rev. James E. W. Cook, rector of St. Paul's 
Church, Greenville, also spoke of the laudable character 
and the ideal ministry of Dr. Drane. 

Dr. Drane had never known such a day. He never real- 
ized that he was so deeply loved and highly esteemed. 
He received hundreds of messages of congratulations 
from all over the country. Hundreds of people, some of 
them having risen at four or five o'clock Monday morning, 
journeyed from afar to express their congratulations. 
Both old and young embraced him with arms of love, in- 
fants toddled after him, beautiful maidens kissed him, 
and all alike sought his benediction. 



STANDING ON THE SIDE LINES. 



Too many of us are standing- on the side lines today 
"viewing with alami" the mighty forces of evil and hate 
and prejudice as they sweep by. 

We are sorry, but we do not sense the remedy. 

Our Lord Jesus Christ did not stand on the side lines. 
He saw the agony and the sin and the ignorance as those 
mighty forces swept by, but He did not stay on the side 
lines. He stepped down into the current and opposed it 
with all the power of His wonderful life. The current 
swept Him against the Cross of Calvary, but thank God, 
the current broke when it stiuck the Cross, and the current 
will break today when it stdkes the Cross of Sacrificial 
devotion in your life and mine. 

The Bishops' Crusade is a call to men and women to 
leave the safe side lines of observation and come down into 
the current with Christ; to stand with Him and strive to- 
gether with Him until the forces of evil break against the 



The plans for the Bishops' Crusade include 
a very simple and practical program of prepa- 
ration to be operated in parishes throughout 
the Church. The National Commission on 
Evangelism, in charge of the Crusade, em- 
phasizes the necessity for preparation, through 
prayer, study and personal work with individ- 
uals. Preparation in the parish begins with 
the simple objective, "Everyone to convince 
one." Rectors are asked to preach on the 
Crusade, to write about it in parish papers, to make every 
effort to insure that their people understand it and are in 
sympathy with it. The Friday before the first Sunday in 
Epiphany is to be observed as a day of silent prayer, in all 
churches, by desig-nated parish groups. The group prin- 
ciple is to be utilized, parishes being divided into small 
groups which will meet for prayer and study, with a de- 
finite effoit to present Christ and His Church to persons 
whose names are assigned to them. 

The Commission can supply prayers, leaflets of infor- 
mation and leaflets for the guidance of parish g-roups. 
Such material may be obtained from diocesan commis- 
sions, or from the office of the National Commission, at 
the Cathedral, Mount St. Alban, Washington, D. C. 

Prayer, knowledg-e, action, are the steps of preparation. 
They lead straight to the objective of the Crusade, the re- 
dedication of Christians to Christ, the awakening of Chris- 
tians to the knowledge of their duty and opportuity as 
messengers of His Gospel. 



GENERAL CHURCH NEWS. 



A striking piece of lay evangelism has been conducted 
by a Negro physician. He was one of only two colored 
communicants in a Georgia town. Acting as lay reader, 
under the direction of the white clergyman, he gathered 
a little congregation. A house has been bought and made 
into a chapel. When Bishop Reese last visited the place 
a mission was organized and twenty people were confirm- 
ed. 



THE ADVANCING SOUTH. 

Any one who loves the South will be interested in a 
recently published book, "The Advancing South," by Ed- 
win Mims, who is professor of English at Vanderbilt Un- 
iversity. (Doubleday Page, Garden City, N. Y., $3.) The 
chapters are unconnected essays which taken together 
form part of the story of the liberal movement in the 
South. There are two or three pages which make plea- 
sant reading for Episcopal Church people. 



"NO SCHOOL BECAUSE OF LIONS." 

This was the entry in the school register in a village on 
Lake Nyasa early this year. When the missionary came 
to visit he found that a lion had taken eighteen people in 
two months, in some cases climbing on to the little thatch- 
ed houses and breaking in. At one station the whole vil- 
lage took refuge in the Christian teacher's house. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



SThe ilisston Hetalb 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OFEAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly at 

AYDEN, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance. 

EDITORIAL STAFF: 

Editor: 

REV. GEORGE F. CAMERON, B.A., B.D. 

Contributing Editors: 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D.D. 
REV. R. B. DRANE, D.D. 
REV. JAMES E. W. COOK, 
MRS. HENRY J. McMILLAN. 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, Ay- 
den, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their addresses, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Manager, 
giving when necessary, both the old and new addresses. 

Subscribers wishing to discontinue their subscriptions 
should so notify the Manager, as an absence of such notifi- 
cation is eonsidered a continuance of the subscription. 

All articles for publication should reach the Business 
Manager by the 25th of the month. New subscriptions, 
renewals, requests for change of address and copy for ad- 
vertisements should be sent to • 

REV. GEORGE F. CAMERON, 

Ayden, N. C. 

YOUTHFUL DEATH. 

A friend of ours has just died at the age of 33; a clergy- 
man — virile, consecrated, clean of mind and limb. In the 
full flush of his young manhood life suddenly ceases and 
his work is done. It seems unjust and incredible. Bitter- 
ness presses hard upon the soul; anguish chokes us. . . 
Yet here, as always, Christianity has an answer. For 
how very close such death brings us to the Christ! He too 
died at 33; so young, so strong, His work on earth barely 
begun. Yet His death was His victory — not the end, but 
the beginning. This we know. . . . What fine young man 
in East Carolina will take up the flung banner of our 
friend? J. A. M. 



a child will never enter therein." The Mission Herald 
wishes for its dear readers the power to brush aside 
worldly cares and approach Christmas with the care-free 
and joyful heart of little children, and thereby enjoy the 
Peace that Christ would bring into the world. G. F. C. 



OUR CHRISTMAS WISH. 

Christmas season is here again. As we grow older each 
Christmas comes more quickly, because the advancing 
years bring such serious responsibilities that matters 
pertaining unto real happiness are crowded out. There 
are not enough Christmases for the little child who is 
unaffected by the worries and cares that make one forget 
the biith of Christ. To him each month between the 
visits of Santa Claus seems like a year; and to him 
Christmas is the greatest event because the simplicity 
and innocence of his life prepare him for it. "Let the 
children come to me," Jesus said, "do not stop them: the 
Kingdom of God belongs to such as these. I tell you 
truly, whoever will not submit to the Kingdom of God like 



FLAMING PRESENCE. 

After the Resurrection, the disciples felt awfully lonely. 
An attachment for their Master had grown over them 
unconsciously. His eager and glowing personality had 
mere effect upon them than they had realized. They had 
a sense of loss that over-powered them. They felt like 
we do, when we return to the empty house, after the 
burial of a loved one. The whole world seemed to them to 
be an empty house, one devoid of love, warmth, and com- 
panionship. Their anxiety, their discontent was the open 
door through which Christ re-entered in a glorified state. 
At Pentecost they found again their living Lord, who had 
such power over them that they became famous for the 
intensity and success with which they«lived the Gospel 
and carried it unto the "uttermost parts." 

This is a challenge to those of us who have empty lives 
because of sin. May we find in the Bishops' Crusade a 
sensible moment, wherein we shall realize the terrifying 
destitution that is induced by sin, and seek company with 
the living Lord whose flaming presence expells sin and re- 
claims us for the Kingdom. G. F. C. 

o 

PARTNERSHIP WITH GOD. 

A group of men traveling through the Southwest were 
discussing the subject of irrigation. One told of a desert 
that had been made fertile and productive when the stor- 
ed waters fiom the distant mountain streams were releas- 
ed and sent upon their beneficent mission, and then added, 
"Isn't it wonderful how many things God left undone in 
order to give men a job?" 

We look out into our world today with its problems 
and its sins, its strivings and its failures, and we realize 
that God has seemingly left undone many things. Why? 
Not because He could not do them perfectly, but because 
He knew that only as men were willing to share in the 
doing of them v/ould they grow a little bit like Him; be- 
cause He knew that those things would not be worth 
while unless they became a real and definite expression of 
man's conscious partnership with Him. 

The Bishops' Crusade calls men to a fresh realization 
that they are God's fellow laborers, that He is depending 
upon them to complete the task. "Master, did you save 
the world?" "No, I gave the plan and left the execution 
of it to men." God grant that we may not fail Him, for 
in so far as we know, He has no other plans. — Bishop 
Darst. 



THE BISHOPS' CRUSADE. 

A Call to Rededication to Jesus Christ in Life and Service. 

"All sensible men keep their religion to themselves," 
thus a recent English writer describes the attitude of the 
average Churchman, and at greater length explains his 
reasons for this judgment of our times: "The example 
of St. Andrew, 'first finding his own brother Simon;' the 
story of the woman of Samaria, hurrying back empty- 
handed from the well to the villagers of Sychar; the pic- 
ture of St. Paul heartening his fellow passengers, huddled 
in panic on the deck of a sinking Alexandrian transport — 
these are but types of a religious experience which made 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



it seem the most natural thing in the world to speak about 
Christ to others, once He had become real to the soul of a 
and or woman. 

"Some may reply that in the first rapture of Christian 
experience, when Christ's coming to a world grown lonely 
and disillusioned was like the spring time of love in the 
life of a man, it seems inevitable that the natural reserves 
and restraints of speech should be forgotten, as a lover 
sometime forgets them when describing his new exper- 
ience to his friends. Ever since Christianity gradually 
took its place among the recognized religions of the world 
its advocacy has very properly been handed over to trained 
and accredited evangelists. The ordinary layman, indeed, 
must be ready to support them by his purse and by his 
example, but not by word of mouth; for all sensible men 
keep their religion to themselves." 

The Bishops' Crusade is a challenge to this attitude, and 
a recall of every member of the Church to the enthusiasm 
which characterized the infant Church with its spontan- 
eous and accepted devotion to the program of personal 
evangelism. Under the leadership of the Bishops of the 
Church, as the constituted leaders of the Church for all 
time, this movement is an effort to regain in terms of 
life and service the irresistible impulse that can only be 
realized when every member of the Church accepts his 
proportionate and personal responsibility for the spread 
of the Gospel. For it has been well said that "our Lord 
never commanded us tO' either go or send some one in our 
place. He commanded us to GO. And every Christian 
has a personal world into which he has to go. It is our 
business to do the going. It is the Lord's prerogative to 
do the sending. No one can send another in his place; he 
can dO' nothing but go without living in disobedience." 

Through a sweeping nation-wide program of preaching, 
which will carry this message into every parish and miss- 
ion throughout the country — preaching that will redefine 
and stress the essential principles of the Christian Gos- 
pel, and at the same time bring to the consciousness of 
the whole membership of the Church the conditions which 
bespeak the crying need of the nation for the Gospel as 
the only solution of all out problems: led and inspired, it 
is hoped, by the Spirit of God and of His Christ — the 
Church through her leaders is seeking a genuine revival of 
Christ-like consecration and the eager desire to pass on 
the Good News to others, which are described in the open- 
ing paragraph of this message. 

Nothing short of this will meet the situation as we see 
it today, or even fulfill the commission which He gave, 
not only to the Apostles, but also to every member of the 
Church, when He left the world, saying, "Go ye into all the 
world, and preach the Gospel to every creature: and lo, 
I am with you always, even unto the end of the world." 

We cannot doubt, unless we are only half Christian, 
that this ancient program can be put into successful op- 
eration in the Twentieth Century, as it has been put into 
operation in every great revival of religious zeal in the 
history of the Church. "The children of this world" are 
reaching the people today with their propositions, and 
"the children of Light" can do the same thing. Every one 
is being reached, and everything is being brought to man 
— everything but the Gospel, and the Church can take the 
Gospel to every man, if Christians feel a personal respon- 
sibility. To convince and convict Christians of this re- 
sponsibility is the outstanding aim of the Bishops' Cru- 
sade. Nothing short of such a conviction will produce its 
attendant results in personal evangelism, and so accom- • 
plish the Church's mission, W. H. M. 



NEWS OF THE DIOCESE. 



All the delegates of the Wilmington Convocation com- 
plimented the congreg-ation of Grace Church, Whiteville, 
N. C., for the fine appearance of the church building. The 
hardwood floor, a recent gift of Mr. F. B. Gault, of Lake 
Waccamaw and Wilmington, is one of the handsomest we 
have ever seen. 



Bishop Finlay, of South Carolina, preached and confirm- 
ed four candidates in St. Stephen's Church, Red Springs, 
before a large congregation, Monday, October 25th. The 
candidates for Confirmation were presented by the mis- 
sionary-in-charge, the Rev. H. G. England. 



Captain John G. Bragaw, Sr., for fifty-five years vestry- 
man of St. Peter's Church, Washington, N. C, died Novem- 
ber 22, 1926, in his eighty-eighth year. 



The following clergymen of East Carolina attended the 
celebration of the Rev. R. B. Drane's Fiftieth Anniversary 
as rector of St. Paul's Church, Edenton, N. C, on Novem- 
ber 1st, 1926: The Revs. Charles E. Williams, of Cres- 
well; H. M. Green, of Winton; A. J. Mackie, of Windsor; 
G. F. Hill, of Elizabeth City; Stephen Gardner, of Wash- 
ington, N. C; Walter R. Noe, of Wilmington; G. F. Cam- 
eron, of Ayden; James E. W. Cook, of Greenville; E. T. 
Jillson, of Hertford; and Archer Boogher, of Fayetteville. 



At a meeting of the Commission on Evangelism in the 
Diocese of East Carolina, held In St. Paul's Church, Green- 
ville, N. C, November 12th, the Rev. C. 0. Pardo, the 
Rev. Walter R. Noe, and the Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., 
were appointed as a Special Committee to create plans 
and work out details of the preparation for the Bishops' 
Crusade in East Carolina. 



CHURCH SCHOOL SERVICE PROGRAM OFFICERS. 



The Diocesan Committee of the Church School Service 
Progi-am has been completed. Following is a list of the 
committee: 

Diocesan Spervisor, Miss Alice Adkins, Southport, N. C. 

Assistant Supervisor, Mrs. W. H. von Eberstein, Wash- 
ington, N. C. 

Secretary, Miss Louise Gaither, Hertford, N. C. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Charles Ives, New Bern, N. C. 

Birthday Thank Offering Secretary, Mrs. W. R. Noe, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Little Helper's Offering Secretary, Miss Ida Peacock, 
Roper, N. C. 

Christmas Box Secretary, Mrs. W. H. von Eberstein, 
Washington, N. C. 



VALUABLE COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIP 

St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C. 



The SMEDES MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, value $270, 
will be available for the year 1927-28. Young- ladies liv- 
ing in the two Carolinas are eligible. The examinations 
will be held in May at the various places where the com- 
petitors live. 

The examinations cover the work usually done in the 
first year of a good high school, i. e., the ninth grade. 
Applicants wishing to take these examinations next spring 
may secure detailed information by writing to the Rector 
of the school. Rev. Warren W. Way, 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



MEMORIALS 



MRS. J. PAUL DAVENPORT. 

Many will learn with deep and sincere regret of the 
passing of Mrs. J. Paul Davenport, Pactolus, on Novem- 
ber 1st, to her peace in the Great Beyond. Because her 
life was marked with the- fruits of faith and hope and 
charity, regret and sorrow must accompany separation. 
It . was her pleasure to g-ive of the joy and peace that 
comes through faith. The comfort she found in living 
the Christian life, even though she suffered much, she 
wanted others to know. 

She was privileged to live this life but forty-one years. 
But in this time she proved a kind friend, a noble wife 
and mother, a Christian one may do well to emulate. To 
think of such a life as hers and her seemingly premature 
departure makes us appreciate the words of the Master 
when He said, "When the fruit is ripe, immediately he 
putteth in the sickle, because the harvest is come." For 
husband, children and loved ones there vv'ill be continued 
sorrow; there will also be an abiding memory of her 
pure and noble life. Certainly all who sorrowfully think 
of her can find comfort in these words: 

"Brief life is here our portion. 
Brief soirow, short-lived care; 

The life that knows no ending. 

The tearless life is there." J. N. B. 



MRS. THOMAS HARVEY, SR. 

On the evening of September 19th, 1926, the earthly 
life of Mrs. Thomas Harvey, Sr., peacefully closed. To 
those who came in daily contact with her, the memory of 
her outstanding qualities: loyalty, unselfishness, modesty, 
optimism, will linger as an inspiration and a benediction. 
Always unobtrusive, willing to remain in the. back- 
grounds, she cheerfully met her obligations in the home, in 
the church, and in the community. More than this, she 
travelled the extra unexpected mile, so quietly and happily 
that only those who followed her most closely realized she 
had done more than her share. It was not the limelight 
she craved, but rather the accomplished task. No wonder 
she could not find evil in others; the good alone filled her 
own soul. The patience with which she met her suffering, 
the courage with which she faced the inevitable, the good 
cheer which permeated from her to the end, together fitt- 
ingly wrought a triumphant closing of a well-spent life. 
Of her, the lines of Milton express the truth: 
"Nothing is here for tears, nothing to wail 
Or knock the breast; no weakness, no contempt, 
Dispraise, or blame; nothing but well and fair, 
And what may quiet us in a death so noble." 
Therefore, be it Resolved, By the Woman's Auxiliary 
of Saint Mary's Episcopal Church (Kinston, N. C.,) that 
the foregoing brief memorial be spread upon our minutes, 
that copies thereof be sent to members of the immediate 
family of the deceased, and copies be published in the 
Kinston press, and in the Mission Herald. 

MRS. C. A. JEFFRESS, Pres. 
MRS. CHAS. B. WOODLEY, 
MRS. G. VERNON COWPER, 
MRS. JOHN G. DAWSON, 

Committee, 




A WONDERFUL RESULT. 



Zadi was a sick, emaciated baby, picked up by the way- 
side six years ago. Her mother was one of a large num- 
ber of Armenian women deported from their homes in 
Turkey. Zadi was taken to a Near East Relief Hospital, 
and later the American physician who saved her life and 
brought her back to health adopted her and brought her to 
America. In many cities this year Zadi will tell the story 
of the thousands of orphans in the Near East, and will ask 
that they be remembered on Golden Rule Sunday, De- 
cember 5th. 

Near East Relief has no cash reserve, no endowment. 
Its program depends on cash gifts and payments on 
pledges. Pledges may be made in any amount. Corres- 
pondence is invited regarding sponsorship pledges where- 
by a definite child is assigned and photographed and story 
furnished to sponsor. 

There were 132,532 orphan children among the more 
than ONE MILLION LIVES saved by Near East Relief. 
35,000 still remain in the care of Near East Relief. 

Make your contribution through local committee or mail 
direct to Near East Relief, 151 Fifth Ave., New York City. 
(Note: This work is endorsed by leading educators, min- 
isters, and officials, including President Coolidge. — Edi- 
tor.) 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



11 



PERSONAL ITEMS 



The Rev. W, O. Cone, rector of St. Stephen's Church, 
Goldsbcro, was the special speaker at the Amistice Day 
celebration in Goldsboro. 

The Rev. E. W. Halleck, rector of St. John's Church, Wil- 
mington, was the principal speaker at the Armistice Day 
celebration in Charleston, S. C. 



The Rev. Joseph M. Taylor, formerly of East Carolina, 
now of the Church of the Holy Comforter, Miami, Florida, 
writes that he escaped from the recent hurricane without 
injury. His church did not fare so well. He says, ''The 
storm almost completely wrecked my church. It took it 
off its foundation, smashed the windows, pulled off the 
roof, wrecked the org-an, and almost ruined everything in 
the church. Total damage amounted to $5,000 to $8,000. 
That was a real, honest to goodness stoim. It killed, 
crippled and wrecked things for about two days." He 
ended his letter with a note of confidence by saying that 
repairs were going forward and that his congregation was 
facing the future with strong hearts. When Mr. Taylor 
went to Miami la-st March his communicant list numbered 
sixty-seven, now it is- has gTown to about five hundred. 



We hereby place Messrs. J. Q. Beckwith, of Lumberton, 
and J. H. Hinton, of Wilmington, on the honor roll, as they 
were the only laymen to attend the Wilmington Convoca- 
tion held in Whiteville. 



East Carolina has three outstanding leaders among the 
two hundred who will serve as Crusaders in the evengelis- 
tic campaign, known as the Bishops' Crusade. They are 
the Rev. William H. Milton, D. D., rector of St. James' 
Church, Wilmington; the Rev. Frank D. Dean, M. D., 
rector of St. Andrew's Church, Wrightsville; and Mr. 
George B. Elliott, a prominent Wilmington layman. May 
God grant unto them the power of His Spirit as they go 
forth in the interest of His Kingdom! 



The Rev. Thomas F. Opie, D. D., formerly of East Caro- 
lina, now of Burlington, N. C, is another member of the 
Two Hundred Crusaders. 



Bishop Thomson, of the Diocese of Southern Virginia, 
visited Zion Church, Jessama, Sunday afternoon, Novem- 
ber 28, and confirmed four persons presented by the rector, 
the Rev. Howard AUigaod. 



k 



The Rev. Howard Alligood, rector of Zion Field, bap- 
tized, by the method of immersion, three persons in Pam- 
lico river on Thanksgiving Day. 



The Rev. G. W. Lay, D. C. L., of Beaufort, recently con- 
ducted Conferences on Religious Education in Detroit, 111., 
Greenville, N. C, Whiteville, N. C, and at the Synod of 
the Fourth Province, Jacksonville, Fla. 



The Rev. Walter B. Clark of Kittrell, N. C, will serve 
Grace Church, Plymouth, and St. Luke's, Roper, through 
the 19th of December. Mr. William H. R. Jackson of Du 
Bose Memorial Training School, Monteagle, Tenn., will 



serve these Churches from December 20 to Maich 20. 

Two impressive features of the Synod of the Fourth 
Province, held in Jacksonville, Fla., were the Solemn Quiet 
Hour, conducted by Bishop Darst, and his sermon on 
Evangelism which was broadcasted. 



Others from East Carolina attending- the Synod of the 
Fou'th Province in Jacksonville, Fla., were Mesdames H. 
J. MacMillan, S. P. Adams, Swift Boatwright, and Fran- 
ces Belding, of Wilmington; and Mrs. J. N. Bynum, of 
Belhaven, N. C. 



The many friends of the Rev. R. B. Drane, D". D., rector 
of St. Paul's Church, Edenton, N. C, rejoice that he is 
improving at Sarah Leigh Hospital, Norfolk, Va. The 
good doctor has been suffering from a deep cold contracted 
several weeks ago. 



The Rev. H. G. Eng-land will take charge of Emmanuel 
Chuich, Farmville; and St. Barnabas' Church, Snow Hill, 
the first of December. 



The Rev. Preston Barr of Blairsville, Pa., will serve St. 
Philip's, Southport, and Grace Church, Whiteville, N. C, 
during the winter months. 



Mr. William Alexander Smith of Du Bose Memorial 
Training School, Monteagle, Tenn., will serve Trinity, 
Lumberton, St. Matthew's, Maxton, St. Stephen's, Red 
Springs, and Christ Church, Hope Mills, fi'om December 
20 to March 20. 



Mr. Frederick Jefferson Drew «f Du Bose Memorial 
Training School, Monteagel, Tenn., will do special work 
in the Diocese during his vacation from December 20 to 
March 20. 



The Posters of the United Thank Offering, made by Mrs. 
James G. Staton, of Williamston, N. C, and exhibited by 
her at the Wilmington Convocation, and the Synod in 
Jacksonville, Fla., have made a very fine impression. Re- 
quest has been made that they be printed for the benefit 
of the whole Province. 



A CHRISTIAN VISIT- 



"There should be a law forbidding persons to rush to the 
home or hospital to visit the sick," growls the exasperated 
surgeon whose patient has been made worse by the visit 
of an acquaintance. 

Without recommending such extereme measures, Lydia 
M. Piatt does make a number of suggestions for visits 
to the sick. Under proper conditions, such visits may be 
beneficial. 

A visitor should be cheerful and quiet; should choose 
appropriate topics of conversation, but should not talk too 
much; should limit the visit to the time allowed by nurse 
or physician, and should make the leave-taking as brief as 
possible. 

The patient may ask the visitor to read to him or to do 
some errand,, but the visitor should refrain from rearrang- 
ing the bed or anything in the sick room unless requested 
to do so. The visitor should never suggest remedies or 
cures, and it is best not to discuss the illness at all unless 
the patient persists in doing so himself. — Hygeia. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

MRS. W. 0. S. SUTHERLAND, Editor of Department, 
318 North 16th Street, Wilimington, N. C. 



THE MESSAGE. 



We, the members of the Woman's Auxiliary in Triennial 
Meeting assembled at New Orleans, in October, 1925, ac- 
cept the messag-e of the Executive Board of 1924 as a 
challenge, and make it our own: declaring that 

"We are deeply concerned over the financial situation 
which continues to face the National Council. 

"We are even more alarmed by the probable cause of 
the situation than we are by the possible effect upon the 
Program of the Church- Believeing that the apathy of 
many Church members is due to failure to use the power 
of Christ to meet the needs of the world today, and, con- 
scious of our own lukewarmness, we have dedicated our- 
selves anew to our Saviour, and will strive to give proof in 
our own lives of our conviction that He is the only way of 
life. 

"Further, we offer, with your approval, to try to awak- 
en the women of the Church to such a conception of Christ, 
that we may all become more effective instruments of His 
power in the accomplishment of His purpose for the 
world. 

"Finally, we declare ourselves willing and ready to co- 
operate in any plans which the National Council may set 
before the Church to meet the immediate emergency." 

To understand the Message, we must know where it 
originated, to whom it was sent, and by whom it was sent. 
We must know also some of the causes which brought 
about the situation which faced the National Council if 
we would make the Message a real force both to the in- 
dividual and to the Parish. These facts must be known 
before the Message is presented if the Message is to be 
understood. 

Questions. 

( 1 ) Where did the Message originate ? 

Ans. With the Executive Board of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary- 

(2) What is the Executive Board of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary? 

This board was created to assist the Executive Secre- 
tary of the Woman's Auxiliary in conducting the business 
of the Woman's Auxiliary between Triennial meetings. 

(3) How many members on this board? 
Sixteen. 

(4) To whom was the Message sent? 
To the National Council. 

(5) What is the National Council? 

The National Council is the executive body of the 
Church which acts for the Church between the sessions 
of General Convention. Its members are elected by Gen- 
eral Convention and the Synods of the Provinces. 

(6) Why was the Message sent to the National Coun- 
cil? 

For the approval of the Council. 

(7) Was the Message considered favorably by the 
Council ? 

Yes. 



(8) What is the relation of the Woman's Auxiliary to 
the National Council? 

The Woman's Auxiliary is an auxiliary to the National 
Council, therefore its work must be done in harmony with 
the plans of the Council, and with the Council's approval. 

(9) What probably caused the situation which faced 
the National Council? 

The indifference of the people of the Church and the 
failure to use the power of Christ to meet the needs of 
the Church. 

(10) Why was it necessary to put the Message before 
the Woman's Auxiliary at the Triennial Meeting after it 
had been sent to the National Council? 

The Message sent to the National Council was sent by 
the Executive Board of the Woman's Auxiliary. It had 
to be put before the women at the Triennial Meeting to be 
accepted by the delegates. 

(12) What were the members of the Woman's Auxil- 
iary asked to do in preparation for the presentation of the 
Message at New Orleans? 

To study the Gospels, that through the study of the 
Gospels, Christ might be more real to them and that they 
would understand Him more fully and that He would 
help them more definitely in their every-day living- 

(13) What is the responsibility of the individual in 
carrying out the Message? 

Re-dedication of self, to the service of our Lord Jesus 
Christ. 

(14) What are we committed to in the Message? 

(a) The payment in full of all general Church quotas; 
(b) The overcoming of lukewarmness by deeper spiritual 
understanding and greater consecration through prayer 
and the sacraments; (c) United parish effort; (d) The 
strengthening of our rural and foreign-born work; (e) 
Closer relationship with the missionaries in the field; (f) 
The carrying out of a constructive program of education 
for peace. 

When you think of possible failure say to yourself: 

"I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth 



PITT COUNTY GET-TOGETHER GROUP MEETS. 



On November IGth, the Pitt County Get-Together Group 
met in St. Luke's, Winterville, N. C. Devotional service 
was led by the Rev. G. F. Cameron, of Ayden. Mrs. Hay- 
wood Dail, of Greenville, vice-president of the Group, pre- 
sided in a most acceptable manner in the absence of Mrs. 
W. C. Askew, of Farmville, the president. Mrs. B. T. 
Cox, of Winterville, read several interesting and exciting 
letters from her daughter. Miss Venetia Cox, a missionary 
in China. The Rev. G. F. Cameron spoke on the subject 
of the Bishops' Crusade. After enjoying a well prepared 
luncheon, the Group heard optimistic reports from the fol- 
lowing Auxiliaries: Ayden Auxiliary, by Mrs. J. W. Quin- 
erly; Grifton Auxiliary, by Mrs. Waldo Gower; Green- 
ville Auxiliary, by Mrs. Phelps. The next meeting will be 
held after Easter, 1927. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



13 



DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA. 

Statement of amounts paid on Apportionments for the 

Church's Program — Diocesan and General — to 

November 26. 1926. 



Location Parish Apportionment 

FIRST 

Edenton, St. Paul's $ 3000.00 

Wilmington, St: James' 11040.00 

Woodville, Grace Church 500.00 

Burgaw, St. Mary's : 100.00 

Winterville, St. Luke's 200.00 

SECOND 

Creswell, St. David's 700.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ's Church 2415.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 4300.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 1500.00 

Greenville, St. Paul's 2100.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 1000.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 2500.00 

New Bern, Christ Church , 4000.00 

Plymouth, Grace Church 1000.00 

Washington, St. Peter's 4500.00 

Wilmington, St. John's 3000.00 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 1995.00 

Windsor, St. Thomas 800.00 

THIRD 

Ayden, St. James' 320.00 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 600.00 

Belhaven, St. James' 500.00 

Bonnerton, St. John's 100.00 

Clinton, St. Paul's 400.00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 250.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 200.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 350.00 

Southport, St. Philip's 250.00 

Williamston, Advent 500.00 

Winton, St. John's 200.00 

Columbia, St. Andrews 300.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 530.00 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 125.00 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas 200.00 

Warsaw, Calvary 80.00 

Whiteville, Grace 90.00 

Yeatsville, St. Matthew's 100.00 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 100.00 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's 70.00 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 60.00 

FOURTH 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' 100.00 

Aurora, Holy Cross 500.00 

Bath, St. Thomas' 100.00 

Chocowinity, Trinity 100.00 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 200.00 

Grifton, St. John's 250.00 

Hope Mills, Christ Church -— 150.00 

Jessama, Zion 275.00 

Lake Landing, St. George's 250.00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 400.00 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 100.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 240.00 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 100.00 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 300.00 

Wilmington, St. Mark's 400.00 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 150.00 

Bunyan, St. Stephen's 25.00 

Edenton, St. John's 150.00 

Edward, Redeemer 25.00 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 50.00 

Fairfield, All Saint's 35.00 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 50.00 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 50.00 

Lumberton, Trinity 100.00 

Maxton, St. Matthew's 50.00 

North West, All Soul's 50.00 

Sladesville, St. John's 30.00 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 100.00 

Trenton, Grace Church 125.00 

Washington, St.. Paul's 250.00 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 100.00 

Aurora, St. Jude's 100.00 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 40.00 



Paid by Paid by 


Parish Ch. 


School 


$2187.55 $ 


100.00 


9644.13 


880.02 


140.00 


61.00 


66.46 




160.00 


26.00 


250.00 


125.00 


950.00 


350.00 


2400.00 




926.40 


61.64 


700.00 


200.00 


625.00 


133.09 


38.19 


100.00 


1450.00 


454.29 


100.00 


75.00 


2625.00 


411.86 


1767.68 


182.55 


1071.71 


182.84 


142.50 


76.70 


165.00 . 




392.74 


78.01 


304.31 


100.00 


100.00 




162.05 


55.19 


77.83 


18.70 




40.00 


184.60 


60.00 


150.00 


100.00 




35.00 


85.00 


15.00 


150.00 


50.00 


235.28 


76.72 


95.00 


17.55 


66.00 - 




40.00 . 




64.50 


25.00 


6.00 


35.00 


85.51 


14.49 


78.15 


7.21 


30.00 


2.15 


$ $ 




100.00 


55.00 


50.45 


4.75 




14.03 


10.00 


20.00 


52.86 


27.14 


80.00 


20.00 


55.91 


23.40 


44.63 


14.54 


350.00 


50.00 


25.00 


12.40 


98.50 


22.50 




7.24 


190.54 


283.00 


246.01 


10.00 


24.27 _ 




3.52 _ 




65.00 


18.75 


5.20 


7.00 




15.00 


25.00 - 




30.00 


10.00 


100.00 - 




25.00 - 




1.00 - 




43.00 


5.00 




42.00 


35.46 


9.46 


45.88 


64.77 


14.50 


6.00 


25.00 


30.25 



Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Kinston, Christ Church 

Murfrecsboro, St. Barnabas' 

Oriental, St. Thomas' 

Pikeville, Mission 

Pollocksville, Mission 

Roborsonville, Mission 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Haddock Cross Roads, St. Stephen's 130.00 

Williamston, St. Ignatius' 30.00 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission 15.00 

Wrightsville, "McCumber's" Mission 20.00 



100.00 




12.50 


125.00 


15.00 


3.00 


50.00 


50.00 




75.00 


56.25 


30.00 


50.00 


34.00 




25.00 






50.00 


50.00 




48.00 


36.00 


5.56 


25.00 






60.00 


12.97 





8.32 
5.00 



5.00 



Total $55,715.00 $29,722.54 $4,976.62 

Amounts paid by parishes, missions, and Church Schools $34,699.16 

Balance due for the year 1926 21,015.84 



ANNUAL PILGRIMAGE MADE TO BATH. 



(By the REV. G. F. CAMERON.) 
The Association for the Restoration and Preservation 
of Old St. Thomas' Church, Bath, N. C, made its annual 
pilgrimage on Tuesday, November 2, 1926. The service 
of Holy Communion was celebrated by the Rev. Thomas 
C. Darst, D. D., Bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina. 
The Rt. Rev. Joseph B. Cheshire, D. D., Bishop of the 
Diocese of North Carolina, made an address on the sub- 
ject of the history of the parish, which was begun during 
the first of the eighteenth century, the Church itself be- 
ing built in the year 1734. Bishop Cheshire said that min- 
isters in those days often had several counties to minister 
to, and sometimes died of the exposure suffered in going 
from one parish to another. When we review the history 
of the Church in North Carolina, we can see, he said, that 
times have changed for the better. Churches are consid- 
erably more numerous, ministers are more adequately 
provided for, and interest in religion is deeper. 

The officers of the Association, Mr. John G. Bragaw, of 
Washington, N. C, president, Mr. Samuel S. Nash, of 
Tarboro, vice-president, and the Rev. Joseph N. Bynum, 
of Belhaven, secretary and treasurer, w^ere elected for 
another year. A new roof has been put on during the 
past summer; the financial condition of the Association is 
good; and plans are under way to resore and preserve 
further the old historic Church of Bath, the oldest church 
building in North Carolina. Until a few years ago the 
Church building, and even the surrounding cemetery, was 
frequently robbed. • A brick, directly above the front 
entrance, on which is engraved the date 1734, was remov- 
ed and carried away, but was later recovered and replaced. 
During the pilgrimage many new members joined the As- 
sociation. 

FRESH FLORIDA ORANGES. 

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dred large size. Sound fruit and satisfaction guaranteed 
or money back. We pay express charges. A box of these 
makes an appreciated Christmas gift. 

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Gainesville, Florida. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



I Young People's Department | 

I MISS BILLIE MELICK, Editor of Department = 
I I 

REGARDING LEADERLESS GROUPS. 

In answer to the question, "What can the Y. P. S. L. 
do in a parish where there are no leaders?" Miss Ann 
Milton, field secretary, makes a helpful reply as follows: 

"You have touched the biggest problem we meet in 
Sevice League work in your experience of lacking leaders. 
I have talked with several clergymen, since receiving your 
letter, who have confronted your problem and they all give 
me the same answer, which I am passing on to you as the 
only possible solution to an extremely difficult situation. 

Even if it were possible for a missionary clergyman to 
act as leader of a league in his charge, it would not be 
desirable, however successful with young people he might 
be. He must, of course, direct their policies, and without 
him the league can have no real life; but the movement 
in its practical details ought to be carried on by the young 
people themselves, and by counselors elected by them from 
the laity. A league is impossible without leaders will- 
ing to devote their energy to the work. 

The only answer that comes to me is 'get leaders.' Rec- 
tors say they have practically had to draft members of 
their congregation, or even outside the community, against 
their will. They have put the situation up to them and 
called on them to fulfill their obligation to the young 
people who are eager for work, yet unable to move with- 
out the help of people equipped to act as leaders. In 
most cases, the persons approached have responded to the 
need, even though in some cases unwillingly. 

Good leaders are hard to find. Oftener than not, un- 
promising material has to be taken and allowed to grow 
with the work. The handbook, already published and dis- 
tributed, ought to be a great help to counselors; and I 
shall be more than glad to give them any information or 
material I can. The parents of members, a school teach- 
er in the community experienced with young people, a 
young lawyer or business man with no other connection 
with the church, a vestryman interested in young people 
— all these have been pressed into service in various places 
where there were apparently no leaders, and woke up to 
find themselves vitally interested as well as successful. 
People otherwise not active in church life can often be 
drawn into Service League work with young people, if 
persistently urged, even past ordinary politeness. Un- 
willingness seems to die out in association with the honest 
enthusiasm of the young people." 



— "—— ♦ WOMEN OF THE EDENTON CONVOCATION MEET. 



When the triumphant Cardinals returned to St. Louis 
after their baseball victories, the parade passed through 
cheering thousands toward the center of the city, where 
Christ Church Cathedral is located. As the victors, the 
bands and the mounted police turned within a block of the 
Cathedral the great bells of the Church pealed out to 
add to the tribute. Sporting editors of the St. Louis pa- 
pers on the following day boxed items about the Cathed- 
ral bells in the center of their pages and the leading paper 
had a long serious editorial commending the action of the 
Dean in having the bells rung. — Living Chuich. 



(Reported by MRS. P. T. ANTHONY.) 
Much interest and enthusiasm was shoAvn by the wo- 
men of the Convocation of Edenton, in their meetings, 
which were held in the Memorial Baptist Church, Green- 
ville on Tuesday and Wednesday, October 19th and 20th. 
The meetings were presided over by the president of the 
Convocation, Mrs. Richard Williams, and the opening ser- 
vices were conducted by the Rev. J. E. W. Cook 

The program, which covered every department of the 
women's work of the church, was most clearly and ably 
discussed, and the addresses by the diocesan officers, Mrs. 
H. J. MacMillan, Mrs. S. P. Adams, Mrs. A. H. Worth, 
Mrs. J. G. Staton, Mrs. Richard Williams, and Miss Mae 
Wood Winslow, were full of helpful and inspiring infor- 
mation. 

The parish reports showed greater activity and pro- 
gress than ever before, clearly demonstrating wide-awake 
interest in every line of the work. 

The following resolution was adopted and a copy sent 
to Bishop Darst: 

"Whereas, The Diocese of East Carolina has loaned 
Bishop Darst to the Church to successfully carry on the 
Bishops' Crusade; 

Resolved, That we, the women in the Convocation of 
Edenton, meeting at Greenville, record our appreciation 
of the work which Bishop Darst is doing; 

Be it further Resolved, That we pledge our loyalty to 
our Bishop, and assure him that we will "carry on" to 
the best of our ability in his absence." 

The delegates and visitors present were: Mrs. J. W. 
Quinerly, Mrs. Helen Turnage, Mrs. J. B. Flaugher, Mrs. 
G. A. Johnson and Mrs. E. F. Burney, of Ayden; Mrs. J. 
H. Blount, Mrs. W H Wahab and Mrs Sterne, of Belhaven; 
Mrs. G. W. Lay, of Beaufort; Miss M. W. Winborne, of 
Edenton; Mrs. E. R. Outlaw, Jr., Mrs. A. B. Hontz, Mrs. 
J. B. Griggs, Mrs. A. H. V/o-th and Miss Helen Little, of 
Elizabeth City; Mrs. W. C. Askew, Mrs. E. C. Beaman, 
Mrs. G. A. Jones, Mrs. Alex. Bynum and Mrs. J. H. 
Shackleford, of Farmville; Mrs. Mary Worthington and 
Mrs. Ned McLohon, of Griffon; Mrs. J. B. Boyle, Mrs. F. B. 
Slade, Jr., Mrs. B. B. Sherrod and Miss Effie Waldo, of 
Hamilton; Miss Mae Wood Winslow, of Hertford; Mrs. 
Virgie Wynn, Miss Maud Vinson, Miss B. Campbell and 
Miss Frances Lawrence, of Murfreesboro; Mrs. A. L. Alex- 
ander, Mrs. R. W. Johnson, Mrs. J. B. Edmonson, Mrs. H. 
A. Blount, Mrs. R. P. Walker, Mrs. L. P. Homthal, Mrs. 
Clyde Gaboon, and Mrs. F C. Hilliard, of Plymouth; Mrs. 
J. G. Staton, of Williamston; Mrs. C. J. Rhea, Mrs. Spool- 
man and Mrs. E. S. Perry, of Windsor; Mrs. E. P. Martin, 
Mrs. W. A. Respess, Mrs. F. L. Outland, Mrs. Rachel Rum- 
ley, Mrs. H. S. Bonner, Mrs. C. E. Lewis, Mrs. Guy C. 
Small, Mrs. W. A. Grimes and Mrs. J. D. Grimes, of 
Washington; Mrs. B. T. Cox, Mrs. J. D. Cox and Mrs. H. 
L. Johnson, of Winterville; Mrs. H. J. McMillan, Mrs. S. 
P. Adams and Miss Miller, of Wilmington. 



Watch the label! It shows the month and year that your 
subscription expires. Many subscribers are already sev- 
eral years in arrears. Has your subscription expired ? If 
so, please remit promptly. By so doing you will be a 
powerful selp to the MISSION HERALD. 



The missionary work of the Church is the adventurous 



Date on label shows when your subscription expires. work, the exciting work of the Church.— C. L. Adams 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



15 



THE POWER AND EFFECT OF INDIVIDUAL 
INFLUENCE. 



DR. NEWTON MADE EPISCOPAL PRIEST. 



I 



(By MRS. LIZZIE GRIFFIN.) 
To my mind this is a subject worthy of most serious 
consideration. It is a very evident fact that we are con- 
stantly touching' the lives of our fellow beings, either for 
help or hindrance, for good or eveil. Each one of us is 
exerting a silent and unconscious influence over all with 
whom we come in contact. Tennyson said, "I am a part of 
all that I have met." We do not realize the magnitude 
of our influence, in that the words we say, the deeds we 
do, are tending to lead some one upward or downward. 
The high and the lowly, the rich and poor, the humble 
and exalted are carrying somebody with them, whichever 
way they, themselves, are g-iong. We are warned in the 
gospel of St. Luke, 11:35, "Take heed therefore that the 
lig'ht which is in thee be not darkness." The fact that 
"we are our brothei's keeper" clothes us with a tremen- 
dous responsibility. Again, "to whom much is given, 
there is much required," The greater our advantages, the 
greater our accountability to God. 

Another thoug-ht is influence over the young. It is quite 
natural for children to repeat the sayings, and adopt the 
ideas of older people. I recall reading once this expression, 
which st;uck me very forcibly, "Youthful minds are like 
pliant wax, susceptible of the most lasting impressions; 
and the good or evil bias they receive, is seldom, if ever, 
eradicated." 

Let us strive to make our lives as a shining light in our 
daily example, that others may walk with us, in the paths 
of duty, lives filled with sacrifice for, and in service to hu- 
manity, ministering to the needy and unfortunate, lend- 
ing an uplifting hand to the erring, cheering the sad heart- 
ed. This will not only bring joy into our own lives, but 
exemplify the teachings and commands of our Saviour 
King. 



MOW CAN I HELP THE WHOLE CHURCH DO ITS 
WHOLE TASK? 



1. Subscribe to the missionary quota of my parish in 
an amount commensurate with my means. 

2. Pay my subscription promptly and regularly. 

3. Make other gifts for emergencies and for Advance 
Work when possible. 

4. Include the Domestic and Foreig-n Missionary So- 
ciety of the Protestant Episcopal church in the United 
States of America in my will. 

5. Take out a life insurance policy naming- the Society 
as beneficiary. 

6. Inform myself as to the work of the General Church 
by reading General Church Program, The Spirit of Miss- 
ions, the Church at Work, one of the Church weeklies, and 
the Mission Herald. 

For further information consult your rector. 



The six new men entering St. John's College, Greeley, 
Col., this year are from Illinois, Kansas, New York, 
Massachusetts, Missouri, and Rhode Island. 



A Sesqui-Centennial pamphlet from the rector of Christ 
Church, Philadelphia, reminds us that among the 36 sign- 
ers of the Declaration of Independence there were 1 Bap- 
tist, 1 Roman Catholic, 2 Quakers, 5 Presbyterians, 13 
Congregationalists, and 34 Church of England men. 



Dr. Joseph Fort Newton, Scottish Rite Mason, and said 
to be one of the twenty-five leading preachers of America, 
was ordained as a priest of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church by Bishop Garland recently. The services took 
place in Old Christ Church, Philadelphia, Pa., the church 
where Geo-rge Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Betty Ross, 
and many others of the country's prominent people wor- 
shipped long- ago. 

Dr. Newton, special preacher of St. Paul's Church, Over- 
brook, Philadelphia, Pa., is the author of more than fifty 
books and was a lecturer in Eng-lish literature in the Uni- 
versity of Iowa. He is known as a master of English and 
English literature. Long prominent in Freemasonry, he 
is the author of the famous work on the Fraternity, "The 
Builder." He is also the editor of the Masonic Service 
journal, The Master Mason. 



The label on THE MISSION HERALD shows the date 
that your subscription expires. Has yours expired? If 
so, please send check to MISSION HERALD, Ayden, N. 
C, and save us the expense of mailing you statement. 



Subscribe to the MISSION HERALD. 



BABY CHICKS FOR SALE. 

Barron strain large type purebred White Leg^horn baby 
chicks, $10.50 per hundred. Chicks are very strong and 
stand cool weather better than hot weather. 

Everlay strain Brown Leghorns, $11.50 hundred. 

Sheppard strain single comb Anconas, $14 hundred. 

Owens and Donaldson strain Rhode Island Reds, $14.85 
hundred. 

Thompsons strain Barred Rocks, $14.85 hundred. 

White Rocks, $16 hundred. 

All good, healthy, strong purebred, guaranteed. 

We pay postage charges and guarantee live arrival on 
all baby chicks. 

Pullets of any breed listed, $1.50 each. 

Cockerels, good size, $3 each. 

Poultry book on feeding and raising chicks and pullets, 
$3 postpaid. 

FULGHUM HATCHERY, 

Clayton, N. C. 



Ayden Furniture Company 

HOME FURNISHERS and FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
"On the Hy-Way," Ayden, N, C. 

When passing through Ayden come in and let us 
show you our stock and quote prices. 



The Peoples Savings Bank 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

Will welcome your business. Four per cent Interest 
Compounded Quarterly allowed on all deposits. 
23 Years Old. Capital and Surplus $250,000.00. 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD. 






|lilHlllli!!!l!ll 



OWN A SUMMER HOME at CAROLINA BEACH 

Carolina Beach is on the Main Land. A Beach that you can drive your Automobile to the Water's 
edge. A good hard road from Wilmington. A new modem hotel now under construction that will be 
completed for the season of 1926. Lots are sold on reasonable terms and as an investment they are ideal. 
Information gladly given. Call or write any authorized representative. 

CAROLINA BEACH CORPORATION 

OWNERS AND DEVELOPERS OF 



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OFFICERS:— S. C. Ogburn, President; W. F. Schaffner, Vice-President; W. W. Walsh, Vice-President; 

E. P. Yates, Vice-President; E. D. Turner, Secretary-Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS:— S. C. Ogburn, S. C. Clark, A. V. Nash, W. F. Shaffner, E. P. Yates, E. D. Turner, W. W. 

Walsh. 
J. L. BECTON, C. E., Wilmington, N. C, Engineer in charge of development. 
REFERENCES: — Any Bank or Mercantile Agency. 



Norfolk-Southern Railroad 



Passenger Schedules Effective May 2, 1926, Plymouth, N C. 



Leave. DAILY. 

2:30 P. M. — Raleigh, New Bern, Goldsboro, Beaufort, 
and intermediate points. Parlor car to 
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points. Sleeping car Raleigh to New Bern. 
12:30 P. M.I — Norfolk and intermediate points. Parlor 

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4:30 A. M. — Norfolk and intermediate points. Sleeping 
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For tickets, Pullman reservations and other informa- 
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W. C. MILLER, Ticket Agent, 

Plymouth, N. C. 



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o 



V 





r\ 



O 





1Lfl-l}imtl)at-I}rarft()saucomf-lUeu22:i7 



BISHOPS' 
CRUSADE 
NUMBER 





lanuacy, 1927 



O 



V 



A 



O 



V 



Published by the Diocese of East Carolina at Ayden, N. C 



.»— 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



St. Mary^s School 

A JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Rev. WAKREN W. WAY, Rector. 



An Episcopal School for Girls. Four years High School and two 
years College Courses. Accredited. Special courses: Music, Ait, 
Expression, Home Economics, Business. 

MODERN EQUIPMENT— 20-ACRE CAMPUS. 

Advent session opened Sept. 15, 1923. For catalogue address 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 






m. 



Altars,Pulpits,Lecteuw5,Fonts,Fabrics,Embroideries.|| 

Memorial Tablets, Stained Glass Windows.U 



56 WEST 8TH ST. NEW YORK. 



LENTEN OFFERING FIFTY YEARS AGO. 



The diocese in which the Lenten Offering originated is planning a na- 
tion-wide celebration o? the fiftieth year of that Offering. 

During the winter of 1877 Mr. John Marston, who was superintendent 
of the Sunday School of St. John's Church, Cynwyd, a suburb of Philadel- 
phia, suggested to the members of his school that they should give their 
'Offerings on the Sundaf/s during Lent that year for the misisonary work of 
the Church. The teachers and pupils gladly agreed to his suggestion, and 
the fi' st Lenten Offering for Missions in that small suburban church in 
1877 amounted to $200. Thus during the year 1927 we commenorate the 
Fiftieth Anniversary of the staiting of "The Lenten Offering for Missions." 
Other Sunday schools in the Diocese of Penns\ Ivania followed the good 
example set by St. John's, especially that of the Holy Apostles, Philadel- 
. phia, of which Mr. George C. Thomas, well known throughout the Church 
as the treasurer for many years of the old Board of Missions, was superin- 
tendent; and next year, that is, in 1878, the Offering amounted to $7 070.50. 
Ever since that date the Sunday school of the Church of the Holy Apostles 
has held the first position among the Church schools in its contributions to 
the Lenten Offering. 

By degrees the plan spread to other dioceses and districts, and in the year 
1900 the Lenten Offering reaching the sum of just over $97,000. In 1920 it 
amounted to $250,000, and in 1926 it leached nearly $500,000. 

Surely it ought to fill us with enthusiasm for this cause to realize that 
since the inauguration of the Lenten Offering for Missions the children and 
young people of the Church have contributed through this agency consid- 
erably over $6,500,000, nearly half of which has been given during the last 
ten years. 

The diocese of Pennsylvania has accepted, through its representatives, 
as its goal for the Lenten Offering of 1927 the sum suggested by the Bishop 
and the Diocesan Convention of $100,000, which is an increase of thirty- 
three per cent over its offering for 1926. How magnificent it would be if 
all the dioceses would seek to increase their Offering by a similiar amount, 
and attain their goal. — Spirit of Missions. 



Mr. Goodwin is the author of a little book published in June by the Na- 
tional Council, called "Beyond City Limits," which may be obtained from 
the Bookstore, 281, Fourth Avenue, New York, for 60 cents, and which will 
certainly open the eyes of many readers to an unsuspected state of things 
in the United States. 



Virginia 
Episcopal School 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 



Prepares boys at cost for Col- 
lege and University. Modern 
equipment. Healthy location in 
the mountains of VirR'inia. Cost 
moderate, made possible through 
generosity of founders. For cat- 
alogue apply to 

■Rev. Wm. G. Pendleton, D. D. 

Rector. 



Church Furnishings 



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Gold, Silver and Brass 

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Write for Catalogue for 
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The Bank of Edentcn 

SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 
. Bank With us by Mail 

JULIAN WOOD, President. 
W. 0. ELLIOTT, Vice-President 
D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 






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Cassocks, Surplices, Stoles 

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Silks, Cloths, Fringes. 

HATS, RABATS, COLLARS 

Cox Sons & Yining 

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NORFOLK-SOUTHERN 


Passeng< 


Br Schedu'.es 


From 


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Effective January 1, 1927. 


Northbound: 






. 1:35 A. 


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J. L. HASSELL, Agent 



I 



The M*-sion Herald. 



Vol. XLI. 



AYDEN, N. C, JANUARY, 1927. 



No. 1. 



OUR BISHOP 




Rt. REV. THOMAS CAMPBELL DARST, D. D., 

Bishop of East Carolina, 
Chairman of the National Commission oin Evangelism. 



One could not find in a day's walk, a servant of the 
Lord more heloved of his people than Bishop Darst is of 
his flock in East Carolina, Everywhere the good bishop 
goes he has a thousand and one manifestations of his peo- 
ple's affection and loyalty. After all, love begets love; 
and there is a mutuality of love betv/een Bishop Darst and 
his people. 

For that reason East Carolina has a peculiar interest in 
the Bishops' Crusade. As every one knows now, the Cru- 
sade was first conceived in the brain of Bishop Darst; and 
that was the reason for the persistency in every part of 
the Chuich that he assume the chairmanship of the Na- 
tional Commission on Evangelism which was created to 
execute the Bishops' Crusade. 

When the clergy of East Carolina were in Conference at 
Wrightsville Beach last September, they dispatched the 
following resolution to their bishop: 



"Be it resolved. That we, the clergy of the Diocese of 
East Carolina, send to our bishop this token of our re- 
newed love and loiyalty, assuring him of our prayers for 
the success of his work for the General Church, and of 
our determination to carry on the work of the diocese, 
du-ing- his absence, to the best of our ability." 

The following is representative of the resolutions sent 
to our bishop by the Edenton Convocation and Wilmington 
Convocation: 

"Be it Resolved, That we record our appreciation of the 
work that Bishop Darst is doing, that we pledge our loy- 
alty to him, and assure him that we will 'carry on' to the 
best of our ability in his absence." 

Yes,- East Carolina follows her bishop with loving pray- 
ers; and they believe that he through the comradeship of 
Christ, will lead the Bishops' Crusade to a glorious victory. 

G. F. C. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



THE CALL TO THE COLORS. 



In response to the call of the National Commission 
on Evangelism nearly three hundred Bishops, Presbyters 
and laymen and women have enlisted as Crusaders for the 
period of the Crusade. With fine enthusiasm and with 
utter devotion they are prepared to go fo'th as leaders in 
this high and holy adventure for God; but we must never 
forget that this Crusade is not simply the enlistment of 
three hundred Crusaders for a period of a few weeks, but 
the enlistment of every man, woman and child in the 
Church for "the period of the war" against the forces that 
oppose the coming of the Kingdom of Christ. 

In Holy Baptism we were enlisted as Christ's faithful 
soldiers and servants, not for a mcmth or a year, not for 
special occasion, but until our "life's end." In Confirma- 
tion we accepted our commission and received the knight- 
ly accolade of the Holy Spirit. 

Some of us have been in the "Rest Camp" too long; 
others have been marking time down in the Valley of In- 
decision while the battle raged upon the hill. 

The colors of the Army of God are with Christ as He 
stands, inadequately supported, on the battle line. 

God sends us up to join Him, to move forward with 
Him until, under His leadei'ship we plant the colors of a 
victorious army on the last stronghold of the enemy. 

"Who is there among you, the true and the tried, 

Who will stand by the colors. 

Who is on the Lord's side?" 

BISHOP DARST. 



CRUSADE MASS MEETINGS. 



Wilmington, January 23-28, inclusive. Crusaders: Rt. 
Rev. Theodore Du Bose Bratton, LL. D., Bishop of Missis- 
sippi; and Rev. Pembroke W. Reed, Richmond, Va. 

Elizabeth City, January 30 to February 4, inclusive. 
Crusaders: Rev. Pembroke W. Reed, Richmond, Va.; and 
Rev. H. F. Kloman, Cumberland, Maryland. 

Washington, February 6-11, inclusive. Crusaders: Rt. 
Rev. Frederick Foote Johnson, D. D., Bishop of Missouri, 
and Rev. H. F. Kloman, Cumberland, Md. 

All the clergy and selected representatives from the 
men, women and young people of each parish and mission 
should attend one of these meetings. Enteitainment will 
be provided. In some cases it may be found helpful to 
designate certain days for certain groups and make a 
special effort to promote attendance from that section on 
that day, arranging train or automobile parties from 
these congregations. 



DIOCESAN CRUSADERS. 



Diocesan Crusaders will carry the Crusade as far as 
possible into every parish and mission of the Diocese. 
They are drafted for service in the same way as the Na- 
tional Crusaders. Subjects for the six sermons of the Cru- 
sade, with digest of each message recommended will be 
furnished in due time by Diocesan Headquarters. 

Note: The Dean of the Convention of Colored Church 
workers has been requested to select the Crusaders for 
the parishes and missions of his Convocation. 

February 14-20, Inclusive. 

Atkinsom, St. Thomas', Rev. Howard Alligood. 
Ajden, St. James', Rev. E. W. Halleck. 
Aurora, Holy Cross, Rev. C. E. Williams. 



Bath, St. Thomas', Rev. H. D. Cone. 

Beaufo t, St. Paul's, Rev. F. D. Dean. 

Belhaven, St. James', Rev. G. F. Cameron. 

Chocowinity, Trinity, Rev. H. M. Green. 

Clinton St. Paul's, Rev. J. Hartley, Ph. D. 

Creswell, St. David's, Rev. A. Miller. 

Edenton, St. Paul's, Rev. S. Gardner. 

Farmville, Emmanuel, Rev. G. F. Hill. 

Fayetteville, St John's, Rev. J. E. W. Cook. 

Gatesville, St. Mary's, Rev. E. T. Jillson. 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's, Rev. G. H. Madara. 

Greenville, St. Paul's, Rev. C. 0. Pardo. 

Grifton, St. John's, Rev. A. J. Mackie. 

Hertro d, Hcl'/ Trinity, Rev. A. Boogher. 

Lake Landing, St. George's, Rev. T. N. Brincefield. 

New Bern, Christ Church, Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D. 

Plymouth, Grace, Rev. W. R. Noe. 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's, Rev. J. N. Bynum. 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's, Rev. G. W. Lay, D. C. L. 

Winton, St. John's, Rev. J. B. Gibble. 

Woodville, Grace, Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D. 

Warsaw, Calvary, Rev. Presto>n Barr. 

North West, All Souls', Rev. S. E. Matthews. 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas', Rev. W. 0. Cone. 

Sunbuuy, St. Peter's, Rev. H. G, England. 

February 21-27 Inclusive. 

Hamilton, St. Martin's Rev. C. E. Williams. 
Hope Mills, Christ, Rev. A. J. Mackie. 
Jessama, Zion, Rev. G. F. Hill. 
Kinstcn, St. Mary's, Rev. C. 0. Pardo. 
Roper, St. Luke's, Rev. E. T. Jillson. 
Seven Springs, Holy Innocents', Rev. J. N. Bynum. 
Southport, St. Philip's, Rev. H. D. Cone. 
Williamston, Advent, Rev. E. W. Halleck. 
Windsor, St. Thomas', Rev. A. Miller. 
Burgaw, St. Mary's, Rev. S. Gardner. 
Columbia, St. Andrew's, Rev. G. H. Madara. 
Fairfield, All Saints', Rev. H. Alligood. 
Faison, St. Gabriel's, Rev. W. R. Noe. 
Lumberton, Trinity, Rev. G. W. Lay, D. C. L. 
Swan Quarter, Calvary, Rev. H. G. England. 
Trenton, Grace, Rev. G. F. Cameron. 
Whiteville, Grace, Rev. J. E. W. Coiok. 
Pollocksville, Mission, Rev. T. N. Brincefield. 
Morehead City, St. Andrew's, Rev. A. Boogher, 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's, Rev. F. D. Dean. 
Sladesville, St. John's, Rev. H. M. Green. 

NOTE. Offerings will be taken at all of the services. 
These offerings will be applied; (1) To the traveling 
and other necessary expenses of the Crusaders; (2) To 
the local publicity expenses; (3) The balance to be sent to 
the Treasurer of the Diocesan Commission to be forward- 
ed to the Treasurer of the National Commission. 



LET US PRAY: 



That capable and devoted clergy may be led by the call 
of God to give themselves in larger numbers and for long- 
er terms of service to the work of rural missions. 

Short pastorates and long interregnums have been a 
great hindrance to this work in all missionary dioceses. 
Bishops in their Convention addresses have spoken of this 
difficulty. Are we praying eamestly enough that the 
clergy may persevere in spheres of labor that involve 
loneliness, poverty, slow progress, small successes? Are 
our own lives in harmony with such a prajer? 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



CHURCH KALENDAR JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1927. 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



"O live ye by the Kalendar, 

And with the good ye dwell; 

The Spirit that came down on them, 

Will Lighten you as we 1." — Bishop Coxe. 

9 — 1st Sunday after Epiphany 
16 — 2nd Sunday after Epiphany 
23 — 3rd Sunday after Epiphany 
25 — Conversion of St. Paul 
30 — 4th Sunday after Epiphan,y 

2— Purification of B. V. M. 

6 — 5th Sunday after Epiphany 



(White) 
(Green) 
(Green) 
(White) 
(Green) 
(White) 
(Green) 



IMPORTANCE OF PRAYER IN THE BISHOPS' 
CRUSADE. 



(By the REV. GUY H. MADARA, Rector, Christ Church, 
New Bern, N. C.) 

It is a delight to take part in the Bishops' Crusade, 
partly for the leason that throughout the whole country 
every one connected with it will, during its whole period, 
be engaged in the apostolic effort to bring back, on a na- 
tional scale, personal consecration of life to the Master, 
personal effort toi His work. Our minds turn to the Trans- 
figuration. The three apostles felt the mighty surge of 
spiritual exaltation, but learned the next day that this 
exaltation was but a preliminary to the great work of 
healing souls. Now, as then, this is the characteristic 
work of the Church of the Blessed Christ. That lesson is 
an important cne in this Crusade; success will, under God, 
be contingent upon earnest and heait searching prayers by 
the whole Church, before and during the Crusade. 

Jesus withdrew often from His disciples to absorb His 
whole soul in intimate com.munion with His Father. He 
came forth from these periods of retirement uplifted and 
strengthened to do His work. That same complete ab- 
sorption in prayer is a necessity if the Crusade is to mea- 
sure in results up to the high standard set forth by our 
beloved bishop. May we during this time turn to our 
heavenly Father with the best and purest faith and as- 
piration. 

The parable of the importunate widow teaches that con- 
tinued prayer is a necessity in the Christian life. When 
St. Peter lay in his prison cell, the whole Church united in 
prayer. It is reasonable to feel that this united prayer of 
the Church, endowed with power by our Master, was an 
effective agency in opening his cell and bringing him forth 
free. So may many today be delivered from the bondage 
of sin by our prayers, to enter into the freedom which is 
in Christ. 

Success in any endeavor is of God. "Except the Lord 
keep the house, they labor in vain that build it." Surely 
this Crusade to win souls must have His approval; but so 
often He waits to know if we want success greatly enough 
to pray, and pray earnestly and fervently. 

How may we know unless we ask Him? At the very 
start of our work we must be sure that we have sub- 
merged self in a great longing for God. And in asking 
God, how often have we found that when we have prayed 
fervently and faithfully, the downsti'etched hand of God 
has grasped our uplifted hand, and given to us the assur- 
ance of His approval. 

A Crusade in prayerful effort can never be without re- 
sult; to know the will of God and to do it is the effo-t of 
His Church. All that may come toi the communities where 



the Crusade is felt will be a gracious gift from God. But 
we must show Him that we are vitally concerned in His 
work; our prayers are the effective means today to bring 
the success we long for; with them, no bounds exist to the 
possibilities of the Crusade in bringing back to humanity 
the knowledge cf its place in the universal plan ox life; a 
place which has inspiied St. John to say "Beloved, now are 
we the soms of God; and it doth not yet appear what we 
shall be." To bring this knowledge to all men is our task 
on earth; in prayerful effort, may we ask for the blessing 
of God, that many may be wcin to Him. 



ST. PETER'S PARISH HOUSE HAS FIRST SERVICE. 



The new parish house of St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 
Washington, N. C, was brilliantly lighted the evening of 
December 29th, 1926, for its first event since the building 
was shut. The occasion was a Christmas tree party for 
the whole parish and its friends. The party was held on 
the third floor, which will eventually be fitted up for a 
g-ymnasium. A large cedar tree beautifully decorated and 
adorned with many different colored lights stood in the 
center of the large room. Around the base of the tree 
were numerous packages which contained presents for all 
who attended the party. 

The ciowds started coming at 7 o'clock, and by the time 
the brief exercises were begun some six or seven hundred 
people had gathered for the festivities. E. K. Willis, sup- 
erintendent 'Oif the church school acted as master of the 
ceremonies. The rector of the parish opened vdth the 
Lord's Prayer and other p'.ayers. Some of the Christmas 
carols were sung. Very brief addresses were made by the 
senior warden of the parish, T. Harvey Myers, the chair- 
man of the building committee, Edmund H. Harding and 
E. K. Willis. 

Santa Claus was present and was assisted in the giving 
out of the presents by Mr. Willis and Mr. Harding. A 
general good time v/as had and every one was well pleased 
with the wonderful progress that had been made on the 
parish house. Plans are afoot for the completion of the 
interior and also for the furnishings, so that the parish 
house can serve its purpose to the best advantage in the 
community. 



THREE GENERATIONS BAPTIZED TOGETHER. 



After the morning services at St. Peter's Episcopal 
Church, Washington, N. C, had been completed on Octo- 
ber 24th, 1926, little Anne Howard Knight, daughter of 
Lieut. ar.d Mrs. Louis B. Knight, and grand-daughter of 
Captain and Mrs. John Charles, was baptized by the rec- 
tor. 

She was brought all the way from Minnesota to be bap- 
tized at St. Peter's font, where her mother and grandmoth- 
er also received baptism. Little Annie wore the same 
hand embroidered French dress worn by her grandmother 
for whom she is named and her mother on similar occas- 
io-ns. 

Her gTandmother, Mrs. Fannie B Knight, and her uncle, 
Robert V. Knight, were baptized at the same time, mak- 
ing- three generations to received baptism from the Rev. 
Stephen Gardner, rector of St. Petei's. 

Rcibert V. Knight, the girl's uncle was her godiather. 
The godmothers (by proxy) were Mrs. R. K. Smith, of 
Camp Hollisburg, Maryland, and Miss Mary Ha-vey 
Charles, of N. C. C W. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



GOLDSBORO CHURCH LOSES VALUED MEMBERS. 



Mr. Cone Finishes 35th Year in Ministry. 



The parish has sustained the loss of several valued mem- 
bers in the past few months. 

Mrs, B. R. King, wife of the Junior Warden, and for 
many years an efficient member and officer in the guilds, 
died September 11, 1926, after a painful illness. Mrs. 
King was best known to the diocese as secretary of the 
Auxiliary. Her clear and beautiful handwriting, and her 
orderly records were admired by all who read them. What- 
ever church work she undertook was carried out with the 
same painstaking care, and she dearly loved to be em- 
ployed in the service of the parish and diocese. She rear- 
ed two daughters who, like her, were zealous and loyal 
church women. . Mrs. Hamilton Underwood, the younger 
of these sisters, died five years ago. Mrs. Robert Par- 
rott, the elder, who was the beloved and accomplished or- 
ganist of St. Stephen's for about ten years, came to the 
end of her beautiful life, October 28, 1926, after a long 
fight with tuberculosis. She was buried from the parish 
church, surrounded by a great throng of loving friends. 
Mrs. Parrott leaves her husband and five young children. 
The two oldest boys have been placed in a boarding school, 
while the others have found a loving home vAth their 
aunt, Mrs. Chester Walsh, of Kinston. 

Another death, which the congregation feels keenly, is 
that of Miss Corinne Dortch, which occurred on December 
23. Miss Corinne was known personally to all the people 
who have worshiped in St. Stephen's from its foundation. 
She was one of two survivors who witnessed the openinig 
service in 1856, the other being Miss Sue Collier, still 
happily active in church life. Throughout her long life 
she had been a pillar of the church, always keenly inter- 
ested in every work undertaken by the congregation. She 
was for many years one of a faithful little group that 
personally kept the church clean and in order, decorated 
it for festivals, looked after its children, acted as sponsor 
and witness, and devotedly attended its worship. It seem- 
ed peculiarly fitting- that her body should lie for the last 
hour amidst the lovely evergreens which adorned the 
church for Christmas, her hands having been engaged in 
similar decoration of the sactuary for over half a century. 
The pall bearers were chosen from among vestrymen and 
intimate friends, among them being Rev. Raine Freeman, 
pastor of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, who had been 
a dear and loyal friend for the whole of his life. 

Mrs. Ellen McGill, wife of James Hume, died at Mt. 
Olive, N. C, where they have lived many years, just after 
Christmas. The Hume family came from Northumber- 
land, England, in 1890, and first settled in Wilmington, then 
in Goldsboro, where they were members of St. Stephen's 
Parish. At Mt. Olive they have enjoyed the occasional 
church services, and when these were not available they 
drove to Faison and Goldsboro to chu ch. Mrs. Hume 
will be sorely missed by the members of the little mission 
at Mt. Olive. 

For all these saints who from their labors rest, their 
fellows in the communion of the church pray that they, 
being delivered from the disquietude of this world, may be 
permitted to behold the King in His beauty, and to enter 
unafraid into the life everlasting. 

Another old friend and benefactor. Col. Wiley B. Fort, 
who was not a member of the church, died December 18, 
1926, at his country home near Pikeville. Several jears 
ago he gave an acre of land with a fine growth of pine 



trees as the site for the Pikeville mission, and afterward 
gave a larg-e amount of timber for the church which is 
now half completed. It was a matter of regret that this 
kind-hearted friend did mot live to see the completion of 
the building, as he had set his heart upon attending the 
opening ser^ace. It is hoped that the construction of this 
needed church will be immediately resumed and carried to 
a successful termination. 

The new Parish House, which was built during the past 
summer as a memorial to the mother of our senior warden, 
Mr. George C. Royall, has been already used several times, 
although it has not yet been consecrated, owing to delays 
in the completion of some small details. Parishioners 
are delighted to find it a marvel of convenience and utility, 
as well as a handsome addition toi the resources of the 
parish. A full description of the plaint will be given in a 
future number of this paper. 

In addition to the new building, the parish has recently 
had the gift of four beautiful memorial windows, several^ 
vessels of glass and silver for the credence table, and a 
set of eucharistic vestments. 

Christmas began with the midnight celebration, which 
was largely attended. The choirs sang Cruickshank's 
splendid service entire, with Dr. Stainer's anthem, "0 
Zion, that bringest Good Tidings." The children's ser- 
vice and Christmas tree on Thursday was the most suc- 
cessful in the history of the parish. A large number of 
our own children were made happy by giving and receiv- 
ing gifts, and they also extended this enjoyment to many 
outside the parish. Mr. John Hicks is the alert and de- 
voted superintendent of the Sunday school, and he had the 
assistance of a clever committee, composed of Messrs. 
Wiley Smith, Simpsoin, and Castex, with Mrs. Tom Nor- 
wood, who amongst them devised a unique and satisfying 
festival for the young people from one to seventy-five 
years of age. 

The rector rounded out his thirty-fifth year in the priest- 
hood at the Advent Ember season. In recognition of this 




ST. STEPHENS' CHURCH, GOLDSBORO, N. C. 
The Rev. W. 0. Cone, Rector. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



event, the Men's Club presented him with $35 in gold as 
a token of their affectionate appreciation. This was given 
him by Santa Claus at the Christmas tree. 

St. Stephen's Church will have two of its active men in 
the Legislature at Raleigh. Mr. Harrison Yelverton be- 
gins his second term as Assemblyman, while a new mem- 
ber of the Senate will be Mr. Kenneth C. Royall, vestry- 
man, teacher in the Sunday School, and lOf no less interest, 
oldest son of our senior warden. Goldsboro's mayor, E. 
G. Porter, is also vestryman; while the County Com- 
missioner of Highways, Sam D. Scott, is another vestry- 
man of the parish engaged prominently in public affairs. 

The church is enjoying the services of the best choir for 
many years. Mr. Kenneth Finlay is the inspiring director, 
while Mrs. H. C. Selby is the accomplished and versatile 
organist. The singers are Mesdames Lynch, Castex, Ham- 
ilton, Scott, W. Royall, Miss Michaux, Messrs. Porter, 
Lynch, Hicks, Meade, Kenneth Finlay, Senior and Junior. 



NEWS OF THOMPSON ORPHANAGE, CHARLOTTE, 

N. C. 



Christmas. 

For the last year or two each cottage has had its own 
tree which makes Christmas more homelike and which they 
unanimously prefer to the old custom of having one big 
tree. On Christmas morning early the children come 
down like the children in any normal home and each has 
a well-filled stocking and several presents on the tree. 
Santa Claus in the person of St. Peter's Church Service 
League asked each child to name the gift most desired 
within reasonable cost and every effort is made to gratify 
each child's desire. In addition several Sunday schools 
and a number of individuals sent boxes and a number of 
Guilds and Auxiliaries sent clothing, and gifts of oranges 
and apples and candy came in just the right amount to 
fill each stocking to its capacity. For all this very gener- 
ous remembrance the children are deeply grateful, and in 
every case feel that they have never had a happier Christ- 
mas. 

A very lovely Christmas sei-vice was held in the chapel 
at eleven. The altar was especially lovely with new white 
altar hangings made by the Massachusetts Altar Society 
and presented through the kindness of Miss Lou H. Hill. 

In the aftemaon the Elks invited all of the children to a 
grand Christmas paity in their fine new home, where two 
beautiful trees, one for the boys and one for the girls, 
with a present for each boy and girl, were much enjoyed. 
Contributions in Kind Received From East Carolina From 
October 28th to December 25th, 1926. 

Goldsboro., Mis. C. R. Porter, box of clothing. 

Lake Landing, St. George's Parish Guild, box clothing. 

Snow Hill Woman's Auxiliary, box clothing for Rosa 
Duffy, and box for Edith Blalock. 

Roxobel, St. Mark's W. A., box clothing and materials. 

Wilmington, Section "B," St. James' W. A., case of 
books for new library. 

Bath, St. Thomas' W. A., box containing clothing and a 
quilt. 

Clinton, Mrs. J. R. Hiatt, president W. A., box clothing 
and material and coat. 

Hope Mills W. A., box clothing. 

Kinston, St. Mary's W. A., large box clothing. 

Wilmington, Sectioin C, St. James' W. A., box clothing 
for Margaret Jeffries. 

Edenton, St. Mary's Guild, two Christmas card books. 



Goldsboro, St. Stephen's Church Periodical Club, Christ- 
mas Cards. 

Merry Hill, E. S. Askew, sack peanuts. 

Ayden, Mrs. R. L. Johnson, box clothing and materials. 

Wilmington, St. Paul's Church School Program, Christ- 
mas presents for children. 

Yeatsville, St. Matthew's S. S., Christmas presents for 
children. 

Cash Contributions Received From East Carolina From 
October 28 to December 25, 1926. 

Kinston, St. Mary's W. A. $ 2.75 

Wilmington, Miss Columbia Munds 10.00 

Mo:ehead City, E. A. Council 2,'50 

Stokes, non-denominational Sunday School 7.50 

Meri\7 Hill, T. A. Smithwick 10.00 

Goldsboro, Miss Collier 5.00 

Halii'ax, Mrs. R. B. Buckell 2.00 

Windsor, Mrs. E. S. Askew 11.00 

Windsor, St. Thomas' Sunday School 4.00 

Elizabethtown, E. A. Robinson 3.00 

Snow Hill, L. V. Morrill 1.00 

Washington, Dr. John Tayloe 1.00 

Washington, Dr. Joshua Tayloe 1.00 

Beaufort, St. Paul's School 20.00 

Wilmington, "A Friend" 2.00 

Robeisonville, Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Cox 10.00 

Wilmington, Miss Wilhelmina Harlow 11.00 

Merry Hill, Emily, Richard and Whitemell Smithwick 1.00 

Woman's Auxiliary 80.00 

Washington, St. Peter's W. A. for books 5.00 

Merry Hill, E. S. Askew 25.00 

Elizabeth City, F. K. Kramer 25.00 

Wilming-ton, St. James' St. Mary's Guild for cloth- 
ing 15.00 

Wilmington, St. James', Section A, W. A. for cloth- 
ing 10.00 

Wilming-ton, St. James', for magazines 5.00 

Williamston, W. A. for books 5.00 

Edenton, Mr. Joe Smith 30.00 

Edenton, Capt. Carl E. Tarkenton 30.00 

Griffon, St. John's Sunday School 5.00 

Lumberton, Trinity 5.00 



BISHOP MITCHELL WANTS NEW SORT OF LAY 
MEMBER.. 



The Bishops' Crusade, to the extent that it is properly 
executed, should be one of the most helpful movements 
undertaken by our National Church within the memory 
of those now living. This Crusade, as I understand it, is 
for the purpose of moving our people to go out into the 
"highways and hedges and compel to come in" those who 
are not within the Kingdom. If the Crusade is to suc- 
ceed, it must soi place upon our lay members the sense of 
their responsibility for having a personal part in this work 
that, for the fiist time in their lives, perhaps, our men and 
women will find themselves advising friends and acquain- 
tances as to their relation to God, as naturally as they 
now consult with them as to the best way to do something 
which pertains to this life only — the care of the car; the 
best way to bake a certain sort of cake, etc. 

God grant that as a result of the Crusade we shall have 
raised up among us a new sort of lay member — those 
whose first care will be the bring-ing of others, for whom 
our blessed Lord died, into His Kingdom. 



L 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Eht mission Mtmlb 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly at 

AYDEN, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance. 

EDITORIAL STAFF: 

Editor: 

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Contributing Editors: 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D.D. 
REV. R. B. DRANE, D.D. 
REV. JAMES E. W. COOK, 
MRS. HENRY J. McMILLAN. 



Advertising rates furnished on application. 
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Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, Ay- 
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Subscribers changing their addresses, or failing to re- 
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giving when necessary, both the old and nevi^ addresses. 

Subscribers wisliing to discontinue their subscriptions 
should so notify the Manager, as an absence of such notifi- 
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All articles for publication should reach the Business 
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renewals, requests for change of address and copy for ad- 
vertisements should be sent to 

REV. GEORGE F. CAMERON, 

Ayden, N. C. 

May our readers have a happy and prosperous New 
Year! 



A REFRESHING FACT. 

The Mission Herald begins the New Year with a nice 
little credit balance. We are very grateful to our sub- 
scribers for their interest and promptness in sending in 
remittances. — The Business Manager. 



WIN THE VICTORY. 

In response to a genuine desire on the part of Bishops, 
priests and lay people, the General Convention, meeting 
in New leans in October, 1925, made Evangelism a very 
real part of its program. 

As a result of the deliberation of that body, a National 
Commission on Evangelism was created, and that Com- 
mission decided that the first step in any program for 
Evangelism in the Church should be a rededication to 
Jesus Christ in life and service on the part of the mem- 
bers of the Church. Out of this conviction grew the Bish- 
ops' Crusade which is to be preeminently a call to the 
colors, a reenlistment of the whole Church under the ban- 
ner of our great leader, Christ. 

During January and February neatly three hundred 
Bishops, priests, laymen and women will go out as Cru- 
saders to at least eighty-four oL the eighty-seven dioceses 
and missionary districts in the United States, conducting 



two or more Crusades of six days each in all dioceses vis- 
ited by them. 

Following the visit of the National Crusaders, practical- 
ly eve-y diocese in the country will conduct diocesan Cru- 
sades, thus carrying the message to the most remote 
parish and mission in every section of the Church. The 
call of the Crusade is not simply a call to the men who 
are to serve as Crusaders, nor is the call confined to the 
Bishops and priests of the Church; it is a call to every 
man and woman and child in the Church, and it is a call to 
consec.ation and to service. 

As a Church we have remained too long in the quiet 
places of lethargy and indifference. Some of us have 
grown deaf to the clear, high call of God. 

As members of the Church, too many of us have wander- 
ed too long in the fogs of materialism and worldliness. 
The Bishops' Crusade calls us to grasp once more the wea- 
pons of faith and love and righteousness and to go forth 
in the splendor- of a new consecration, guided by the will- 
ing power of the Holy Ghost to join our Master, Christ, 
and win with Him the victory. 

May we so pray and prepare and serve that this great 
hig-h adventure for God may, in our lives and homes and 
community and world, set forward the coming of the King- 
dom of His Son into the hea ts of all men. 

BISHOP DARST. 



THE DERVISH AND THE PRAYER BOOK.] 

To stand off find sec in perspective the machinery of 
another faith sometimes gives us strength and insight in- 
to how ou" own cogs mesh. For instance, there was an 
interesting item in the daily press recently regarding 
Mohammedanism. It seems that a certain Dervish, inspir- 
ed directly by Allah in a vision, began praying North to- 
wards Jerusalem instead of East towards Mecca, as all 
true Moslems should. For this offense the bonified eccles- 
iastics summoned a council of tlie faithful and put him to 
trial. He was adjudged guilty of heresy in the first de- 
gree and warned that henceforth he must pray towards 
the Sea of Grace. 

Now good Christians will see this little Mohammedian 
misadventure with varying eyes. The Dervish was a rit- 
ualistic heretic, no doubt about that. He set himself up 
ag'ainst the traditions of the established Church; he said 
he was guided directly from Above in his ceremonials (as 
are all pro-testants.) On the other hand it is an open 
question whether Allah would bother "inspiring^' his crea- 
tures on sucli silly matters as the geographic orientation 
of the mouth of prayer, deep as was the devotion of the 
Dervish. Erg-o, does Allah inspire faithful followers in 
council assembled as to the correct position of the ortho- 
dox when praying? 

I am not being irreverent and flip. This is at heart one 
of the gravest matters in life. For while the solemn as- 
sembly of bearded ecclesiastics met and settled the hash 
of the north-praying Dervish, thereby making the Faith 
safe foT another generation, their beautiful city of Da- 
mascus lay shattered and smoking from French guns; and 
Palestine with a soil blood-drenched from the broken 
hearts of forty centuries, still cried aloud under the mis- 
fortune of industrial and economic unrest; and across the 
sparkling blue sea were thousands of Armenian Orphans 
who had been rendered homeless and desolate by the rapac- 
ious cruelty of God-fearing Mohammedians. And across 
other seas seven million dead men cried out that wars be 
made to cease throughout the world; and suffeiing hu- 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



r9 



manity prayed that the piled up problems of ten years of 
world unrest be bravely met by the minds best capable. 

SiOi the Dervishes trained in matters of soul-salvation 
and of God's dealings with His children, met in solemn 
conclave and settled their mis-guided brother's hash. 
While in the U. S. A. the greatest minds of a Church re- 
presenting thinking America, met in convention and spent 
most of their time discussing the Prayer Book and kicking 
out a gray-haired brother who had gone theologically 
nutty. — J. A. M. 



AN OLD MAN SPEAKS FROM THE GRAVE. 

During the World War we drank out fill of military 
propaganda just like everybody else. We thought the 
Kaiser the most cruel of all men, and we believed that the 
rulers of the Allies were without spot lOr blemish. But 
there was one piece of pie that we ate cum grano salis — 
we didn't believe that Eugene V. Debs, the American So- 
cialist leader, was as mentally unbalanced as he was pic- 
tured. While we never doubted that he was . guilty of 
violating the mores during the progress of war, we were 
moved with compassion and filled with silent admiration 
as we watched him, an old man, trotted off in a cloud of 
dust to the federal prison. No political drama of modern 
times has so nearly approached the scene of Socrates' 
trial and the occasion of his drinking the fatal hemlock. 
We have today talked with several men in the street — 
men who are leaders in their oc-mmunity — about Eugene 
V. Debs, and they all agree that only his methods could 
be successfully assailed, that his ideals were laudable. 
They all admired his courage and fearlessness. 

It would be a pitiful irony if the world that once hated, 
scoffed, scorned and imprisoned, came at last to admire 
the principles and follow the spirit of Eugene V. Debs, the 
apostle of peace, and the champion of the oppressed 
masses. 

And even now the old man speaks from the grave! The 
other day a number of representative Episcopalians, who 
are interested in the social Gospel, framed a social ser- 
vice statement, and quoted the following glowing words 
of the late Eugene V. Debs: 

"Years agoi I recognized my kinship with all living be- 
ings, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better 
than the meanest of the earth. I said then, and I say now, 
that while there is a lower class I am in it; while there is a 
criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison 
I am not free." 

These words vividly portray the mind of Christ and con- 
tain an unescapable charm and grace. Without a jar we 
could insert them into some of the treasured expositions 
of Socrates. We would dare go farther and believe that 
Socrates, where he now dwells, has added to his illustrious 
company, composed of the Trojan hero Palamedes, and the 
beautiful Ajax, and many others of the famous ancients, 
the comradeship of that lover of men, Eugene V. Debs. 

"They are slaves who fear to speak 

For the fallen and the weak; 

They are slaves who will not choose 

Hatred, scoffing and abuse i 

Rather than in silence shrink 

From the truths they needs must think." 

— G. F. C. 



PHENOMENAL! 



'i. 



"Unconsecrated wealth of Christians is the greatest 
hindrance to the Church's progress." 



The resolution calling f cr the Outlawry of W-ar, intro-^ 
duced in the United States Senate on Decembei- 9, 1926;^ 
by Senator Borah of Idaho, is of phenomenal import* Its- 
unorthodoxy arouses curiosity and suspicion at once. Its' 
principle is staggering and upsetting because it calls for a" 
reversal of lOur mental processes in regard to war. - War 
at present is lawful under certain conditions, and is con- 
sidered essential to our modern civilization. The resolu-- 
tion requires that we pronounce war a sin, a crime, and" 
unnecessary to civilization. It calls for a way that ho 
civilized nation, much less savagery, ever traveled. Its iit-- 
troduction intoi such an august body as the United Sta/tes"- 
Senate is of phenomenal proportions because some men 
who have fought for its principles have been cast into 
prison, some have been stigmatized, and others have been 
maliciously treated. 

Weight is added to the introduction ;of this resolution, 
because of the character of the man behind it. The name 
of Senator Borah brings terror into certain camps. He- 
has been called an obstructionist and an isolationist. Buti, 
if he is such, it is because he travels unbeaten paths and 
explores new heights. If men cannot see as he sees, it is- 
because they cannot keep his rapid pace and have not the 
integrity to travel the rugged roads that lead to the 
heights of prophecy. Senator Borah, has been called by 
those who know him best a sound internationalist, a dat- 
ing idealist, and the most Christian statesman in America. 
No one doubts his intellectual attainments, his power of' 
keen analysis, his dynamic eloquence, and his illimitable 
industry. Moreover, all admit that he is one of the clever- 
est and most courageous and fearless leaders in the United 
States Senate. Yes, the resolution for the outlawry of 
war has behind it a twentieth century giant! 

The idea of the outlawry of war is something entirely 
new in the annals of civilization. Heretofore, war has 
been sanctioned as being justifiable under specifiic condi- 
tions, and even the Christian ministry has been known to 
bless the arms of warfare that they might be more suc- 
cessful in destroying the enemy. But the outlawry of 
war would make it a sin and a crime. Those who would 
participate in it would be guilty of crime, just as one 
would be guilty of a crime if he were to take part in a 
duel today, even though duelling- was once considered 
honorable conduct. How would disputes between nations 
be settled without the usual bloodshed ? Why, an inter 
national court, analogous to our Supreme Court, would' 
settle them by adjudication; and its decrees would be en- 
forced by the sanction and pressure of public opinion, and 
never by the force lof arms. 

Of course, no civilized nation has ever decreed war to be 
a sin and a crime, thereby outlawing it; but that should 
not be prima facie evidence that the resolution is wrong. 
It is too much to hope that the resolution will pass the 
United States Senate without a fight. But it is gaining 
converts with astonishing rapidity — all the young idealist 
in America and all the rest of the world are enamored of 
the peace ideal — and we believe our own generation will 
see a decided change in our interpretation of the problem 
of war. If enough men of Senator Borah's heroic type 
will co-iciperate with the World Peace movement it \yill 
conquer in an amazingly short time and usher in the gol- 
den conditions of universal brotherhood that we have 
waited for so long. The resolution certainly bespeaks 
prophetic statesmanship, and cannot be consistently op-; 
piosed by those who call themselves Christians. — G.-.F. C- 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



1926 GOALS AND OFFERINGS FOR THOMPSON 



Young People's Department 

MISS BILLIE MELICK, Editor of Department 



Miss Ann Milton, executive field secretary of the Young 
People's Service League, has been given a leave of absence 
by Bishop Darst for two or three months, beginning the 
first of the year. Du ing Miss Milton's absence, Mr. 
Thomas Wright, Nun Street, Wilmington N. C, will have 
charge; and all correspondence relating to the Y. P. S. L. 
should be addressed to him. 



WANTED. 

The Young People's Service League of the Diocese of 
East Carolina needs a good standard typewriter. If any 
of 0ar readers have one to spare, they will confer a favor 
upom the young people by forwarding it gratis to the 
Young People's Service League, care of Miss Ann Milton, 
Wilmington, N. C. 



YOUNG PEOPLE OF GOOD SHEPHERD, WILMING- 
TON, N. C, PRESENT PLAY. 

A large number of young people, representing the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary, the Church School, and the Young Peo- 
ple's Service League of the Good Shepherd Church, Wil- 
mington, N. C, recently presented an Every Member Can- 
vass pla,y entitled, "Why Should I?" The play answered 
the question "Why should I give to both the Parish and 
the General Church Program?" and was given immediate- 
ly preceding the Every Member Canvass in the Pansh. 

The play was wonderful, inspiring and gripping. It 
was written by the Parish Worker, Miss Robertson, and 
is recommended to parishes that wish to present an argu- 
ment for the Every Member Canvass. Thoee interested 
should write the rector, the Rev. J. B. Gibble, Wilming- 
ton, N. C. 

A delightful musical program, given by a number of the 
young people, was greatly enjoyed by all present. 



YOUNG PEOPLE OF ST. JAMES' CHURCH, WILMING- 
TON, N. C, HAVE SOCIALS. 

Two socials have recently been held in the Parish House 
of St. James' church by the Young People's Service Lea- 
gue. The entertainment for the first lOf these was so 
ideally arranged and executed by the committee in charge 
and the evening proved so thoroughly enjoyable that the 
same program was used for both of these affairs. After 
the members and guests of the League had arrived and 
introductions and welcomings had subsided, the party was 
divided into teams of four and five and a treasure hunt 
began, the team being most adept at following the clues 
(which were very cleverly arranged) finding the treasure. 
Slips of paper were then given each one present. Upon 
these slips was printed some entertainment which it was 
the duty of the owner to perform in the presence of all. 
These were then called for in turn and, it is needless 
to add, quite a bit of entertainment was afforded at the 
expense of the entertainer. After serving ref .es>.ments, 
which consisted of ice-cream, cake, and candy, other games 
were played until the lateness of the hour brought a most 
delightful evening to a close. 

At the second of these socials, held shortly after foot- 
ball season, the coach and members of the New Hanover 
High School team were made honor guests of the occasion. 



ORPHANAGE. 

Goal 

Edenton, St. Paul's $428. 

Wilmington, .St. James' 1578. 

Woodville, Grace Church 71, 

Burgavv', St. Mary's 14. 

Winterville, St. Luke's 28. 

Creswell, St. David's 100. 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 345, 

Fayetteville, St. John's 615 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 215. 

Greenville, St. Paul's 300 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 168 

Kinston, St. Mary's 358, 

New Bern, Christ Church 572 

Plymouth, Grace Church 143. 

Washington, St. Peter's 643 

Wilmington, St. John's 428, 

285 

115, 

46 

86, 

71 

14, 

57. 

36, 

28, 

50, 

36, 

71, 

28 

43, 

76 

18, 

28, 

11, 

13 

14, 

19, 

10. 



Wilmington, St. Paul's 

Windsor, SL. Thomas' 

Ayden, St. James' 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 

Belhaven, St. James' 

Honnerton, St. John's 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Roper, St. Lukes 

Southport, St. Phillips' 

Williamston, Church of Advent _ 

Winton, St. John's 

Columbia, St. Andrews 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas 

Warsaw, Calvary 

Whiteville, Grace Church 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 

Morehead City, St. Andrews' — 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Chocowinity, Trinity 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 

Jessama, Zion 

Lake Landing, St. Georges' 

Red Springs, St. Stephens' 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 

Bunyan, St. Stephen's 

Edward, Redeemer 

Fairfield, All Saints 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 

Lumberton, Trinity 

Maxton. St Matthews' 

North West, All Souls' 

Sladeville, St. John's 

Sunbury, St. Petor's 

Trenton, Grace Church 

Wrightesville, St. Andrews' 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Kinston, Christ Church 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas 

Oriental, St. Thomas' 

Pikeville Mission 

Pollocksville Mission 

Robersonville Mission 



00 
00 
50 
50 
50 
00 
,00 
,00 
00 
,00 
,00 
,00 
,00 
00 
.00 
,00 
,00 
,00 
.00 
00 
.50 
50 
25 
00 
50 
00 
00 
,50 
,50 
,00 
.00 
,00 
,50 
50 
.00 
,50 
,00 
.00 
.50 
50 
.50 
50 
.50 
00 
50 
50 
00 
50 
50 
50 
00 
50 
.50 
00 
.25 
.50 
.25 
25 
.25 
50 
00 
.50 
.25 
.00 
.25 
50 
25 
00 
.50 



Total $7676.00 



SOUTH DAKOTA. 



Offering 

$ 365 66 

1427.60 

23.07 

"2~8~50 

""Te'o? 

136.50 
141.19 
127.80 
213.29 
72.30 
154.98 

"~3"5Y.38 

364.45 

219.37 

50.76 

46.00 

76.80 

74.50 

4.15 

17.00 

20.57 

25.00 

20.12 

'"42~65 
18.00 
43.00 
40.73 
18.00 
5.00 

""iT.bo 

14.50 

"45T7O 
4.25 

'"lY.ii 

13.60 

28.50 

36.00 

20.50 

10.00 

32.00 

18.54 

36.10 

26.29 

61.14 

5.00 

3.51 

5.00 

10.76 



6.00 

'29~00 

5.00 

17.50 

7.25 



5.82 



$4651.22 



Send our box to South Dakota! 

Onward it sped. 

Unsatisfied was Nakota, 

The Indian maid. 

Her life was so lonely, for 

Dolls she had none! 

Alfred, the missionary, taught her of Jesus. 

Knelt they in prayer each morn. 

On went our box 

To South Dakota, 

And faith in her prayer had won. 

A. W. T. Age 13. 



A GRACE BEFORE MEALS. 

We thank Thee, O Lord, for this food. Bless it to our 
use, and us to Thy faithful service, for Jesus Christ's sake. 
Amen. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



11 



PERSONAL ITEMS 



The Rev. Frank D. Dean, M. D., of Wilmington, N. C, 
one of East Carolina's national crusaders, opened the Bis- 
hops' Crusade in St. Luke's Cathedral, Portland, Maine, on 
January 9th, 1927. 



The Rev. James E. W. Cook will not fill his Fa;yetteville 
appointment as crusader as he has been appointed cru- 
sader to assist Bishop Burlesom, in the Diocese of New 
Hampshire, from February 6th to 18th, inclusive. 



As a token of their love, good-will and appreciation, the 
people of the Diocese of East Carolina presented a pec- 
toral cross to their beloved Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Thomas 
Campbell Darst, D. D., upon the twelfth anniversary of 
his elevation to the episcopate. 



The Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., of Wilmington, N. C, left 
January 6, for New York City to attend a conference on 
the Bishops' Ciusade. After visiting Yonkers, N. Y., and 
Cleveland, Ohio, he will return to Wilmington, N. C, in 
time for the opening services of the Bishops' Crusade on 
January 23rd. 



The Rev. Robert B. Drane, D. D., of Edenton, N. C, 
who has recently been seriously ill in a Norfolk Hospital 
i§ back home again, getting stroinger every day. Dr. 
Drane is the senior clergyman in the Diocese of East 
Carolina, is greatly beloved, and we are all happy that he 
is improving so rapidly. 



The Rev. Sidney E. Matthews has resigned his parish in 
Hyde County. He has taken charge of work at Erwin 
and other points in the Diocese of East Carolina. His was 
a faithful minstry in Hyde County where he greatly en- 
deared himself to his people. We wish him much happi- 
ness and success in his new field. 



The Rev. and Mrs. Harrell J. Lewis received minor in- 
juries in a recent automobile accident. As a result 
Mr. Lewis was in the hospital two days. Mr. Lewis is 
a native of Clinton, N. C, and is one of East Carolina's 
students at the Virginia Seminary. He is also curate at 
St. Mark's Church, one of the largest in Washington, D. 
C. We rejoice that our friends recovered so rapidly. 



On December 29th, 1926, the Rev. Herbert D. Cone, of 
Clinton, N. C, and Miss Tillie L. Spencer were married in 
the Memorial Episcopal Church, Baltimore, Md., the Rev. 
Dr. Page Dame officiating. After spending a week in 
Atlantic City, N. J., Mr. and Mrs. Cone returned to Clin- 
ton. We wish for the happy couple a New Year filled with 
health and joy. 



During last November, the Rev. James E. W. Cook, of 
Greenville, conducted a valuable mission in St. David's 
Church, Creswell, N. C. In addition to his regular duties, 
Mr. Cook addressed the following organizations during the 
early part of December: The Pitt County Medical Asso- 
ciation, the Pitt County Public School Teachers' Associa- 
tion, and the Men's Club, of the Church, of the Advent, 
Williamston, N. C. 



L 



Mrs. Richard Williams, president of the Edenton Con- 
vocation, returned to her home in Greenville, N. C, Janu- 
ary 8th, from Baltimore, where she had been in a hospital 
for five weeks. Her many friends will be glad to hear 
that she is making splendid progress to health. 



The Rev. H. G. England, of the Diocese of Harrisburg, 
formerly minister-in-charge of the Lumberton Field, re- 
cently accepted a call to the rectorship of Emanuel Church, 
Farmville, and St. Barnabas' Church, Snjow Hill, N. C. 
He and Mrs. England expect to be settled in the rectory 
in Farmville early in January. Mr. England began work 
in his new field about the first of December, and is being 
waimly greeted by his people. 



The congregation of the Church of the Holy Comforter, 
Richmond, Va., recently presented a purse of gold to their 
beloved rector, the Rev. William Edward Cox, as a token 
of their appreciation for his successful rectorate during 
the past ten years. Notable achievements have been the 
building oif a $60,000 parish house and a one-hundred per 
cent increase in the membership. Mr. Cox was born in 
Pitt County, N. C|, near Old St. John's Church. Before 
going to Richmond, he served St. Paul's Church, Green- 
ville, for five yeas, and St. John's Church, Wilmington, 
N. C, for nine years. He was also, once upon a time, 
editor lOf the Mission Herald, which is jubilant over his 
marked success and wishes for him continued prosperity 
in the Master's vineyard. 



THE NEW YEAR. 



(By J. D. TEMPLETON.) 

I am the New Year, and I come to you pure and unstained, 

Fresh from the hand of God. 

Each day, a precious pearl, to you is given 

That you must string upon the silver thread of Life. 

Once strung can never be unthreaded but stays 

An undjing record of your faith and skill. 

Each golden minute link you then must weld into the chain 
of hours 

That is no stronger than its weakest link. 

Into your hands is given all the wealth and power 

To make your life just what you will. 

I give to you, free and unstinted, twelve glorious months 

Of soothing rain and sunshine golden; 

The days for work and rest, the nights for peaceful slum- 
ber. 

All that I have I give with love unspoken. 

All that I ask — you keep the faith unbroken! 

Success Magazine (New York.) 



WE FINISHED ALL RIGHT. 

We are advised by the executive secretary that the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina was able to meet all financial obliga- 
tions for the year 1926, because of the elegant response 
made by the parishes and missions. 



"Earning makes an industrious man; spending, a well 
furnished man; saving, a prepared man; giving, a blessed 
man." 



"Jesus teaches that a man's attitude to the Kingdom of 
God is revealed by his attitude to his property." 



Date on label shows when your subscription expires. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

MRS. W. 0. S SUTHERLAND, Editor of Department, 
318 North 16th Street, Wilimington, N. C. 



WHY SHOULD I BE A MEMBER OF THE AUXIL- 
IARY TO THE NATIONAL COUNCIL? 



. (By MRS. WALLACE H. HUFFINES ) 
In dealing^ with this question there are several reasons 
that occur to me, but thee are four that stand out in par- 
ticular and it is these tha;t I wish to take up: 

The first reason is: that I need a reminder. While it is 
true that every baptized woman, by virtue of her baptism, 
is made a member of Christ's body, the Church, and may 
if she will, be an individual member of the Auxiliary, I 
do not always act as if I remembeed this. I do not really 
forget it, but I am often thoughtless. I meed to be con- 
stantly reminded that I am a "member of Christ;" a child 
of God and an inheritor of the Kingdom of heaven; that 
I may govern my ccnduct accordingly, and give myself to 
work with others in harmony to the accomplishment of 
Plis plans. The members of my physical body, my hands, 
my feet, do they not work together to do the will of the 
mind, the head? If I, then, am a member of Christ's body, 
doing the will of the Godhead, I should have a very real 
sense of my personal responsibility in the mission that has 
been given to me. But I am so apt to forget, or to act as 
though I did, that some reminder is needed; and so the 
National Council formed the Woman's Auxiliary for this 
purpose. I should therefore seek to learn the mind of 
Christ, that I may obey it in my own life and interpret it 
to others; and in the Auxiliary I have the opportunity to 
do this through study and service. 

The second reason is: that I do not stand alone in this 
world. I am a member of a family under one head; a sol- 
dier under authority. The Church which is my home and 
the army in whose ranks I stand, has named Missions, the 
extension of Christ's Kingdom as its life work; and as an 
obedient child in the family and a loyal soldier in the army 
I must enlist in the service called for. Some of us may 
prefer some particular kind of service and some another, 
but the Auxiliary through its departments of Religious Ed- 
ucation and Christian Social Service, as well as Missions 
and Chuich Extension, offers us work along all lines. In 
the five fields of service in which the Guilds as well as the 
Auxiliaries work we start at the point nearest us, the 
community, and work outward to the most distant, the 
world. This covers both home and foreign missions and 
gives opportunity for all of the local work any one might 
want to do. All of us cannot go into the field as mission- 
aries of course, nor can we all do the big jobs here at home, 
but there are countless smaller tasks always waiting to 
be done where I may lend my help and my influence, whose 
far-reaching effects I may never know or estimate. Each 
has her own contribution to make and can best do it 
through the Auxiliary where her efforts are guided and 
directed into those channels where they are most needed at 
that time. It is a serious thought to realize that no one 
can do my work for the Master for me. You must do 
yours and I must do mine. If I fall down on mine and you 
do more than you feel is your share, it cannot be account- 
ed to me. Theie is always the personal responsibility for 



the gifts and abilities of each individual. And to the wo- 
men are given such special trusts as a more natural in- 
stinct for devotion a love for children and a skill and 
patience in leading them and an ability for working out 
details to the accomplishment of big things. Upon us 
rests responsibility in such matters as these and we must 
rise to the occasion. We must use our talents that they 
may increase and that those which we have may not be 
taken from us, for growth can only come through service. 

The third reason is: because I have received great 
blessings. Besides the inestimable blessing bestowed in 
Holy Baptism, every woman has this: that through her 
union with the Risen Christ, she is held in honor and 
esteem, in reverence and love. She is free to think and 
to do; she has a place of her own and is an integral part 
of the great family of God; and realizing my blessings 
can I close my eyes to the millions of other women who 
have not been blessed, who are ignorant of the story of 
the Christ? Can I refuse to send to those who are trying 
to find God, the message of salvation and eternal life ? 
Thciy do not knew that they may become members of Him 
through Holy Baptism; that He will give them spiritual 
food; that He will sustain them and lift them up to high 
places. And because I know this and they do not I should 
give of myself and my substance to take the message to 
them and my heait should be filled with joy, not only be- 
cause I have received so rnuch, but that I am able to give 
so much. 

The fourth and last reason is: because the conquest is 
not yet complete. I know that some day all nations shall 
be brought to God, and at the name of Jesus every knee 
shall bow, but I do not know when that will be. I only 
know that this is the time allotted to me in which I can 
help make him known. He has given us His commands 
"Go ye into all the world," "Ye shall be witnesses unto 
me," "Feed my sheep." Surely there should be no ques- 
tion in our minds as to the fact that this is His plan for 
us; that He has given us the world to win for Him. To 
this high task we are called and for this purpose we aie 
banded together. And since this is so, every baptized 
woman in the church, if not from a sense of love and grati- 
tude, then from a sense of duty and responsibility, should 
take her place in the ranks of the Auxiliaiiy where she 
may strive to be worthy of her birthright, where she may 
add her efforts to those of thousands of other women who 
are endeavoring to be true members of His Body by doing 
His will, — "to make Him known to all nations as their Sa- 
viour and their King." 



PRESIDENT COOLIDGE EXTENDS BEST WISHES. 



Led by Bishop Freeman and Bishop Darst, a delegation 
of men interested in the Crusade visited the White House 
and explained the objective of the Bishops' Crusade to 
the President. Mr. Coolidge expressed the belief that spir- 
itual objectives are the things most needed in the country's 
life, and extended his best wishes for the success of the 
movement. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



13 



POSSIBLE EFFECT OF THE BISHOPS' CRUSADE 
UPON THE MINISTRY. 



"THE BANNER SCHOOL." 



(By the REV. STEPHEN GARDNER, Rector, St. Peter's 
Church, Washington, N. C.) 

In all the articles by the leading clergymen and laymen 
of the Church the stress is not laid so much upon the spir- 
itual qualifications of the clergy as upon the need for 
"more labore s into the harvest." 

So we will take it for granted that in the Bishops' Cru- 
sade the clergy are fully awake to its need, that something 
must be done to increase the ministry, not in quality, but 
in quantity. Will the Bishops' Crusade have this effect 
upon the Church ? 

From my own experience I am sure it will have the 
blessed effect of leading young men to take up the minis- 
try of the Church. Envi onment is one of the strongest 
influences upon human nature. The youth of our land 
will follow in the footsteps of the adults, whether the lat- 
ter are aware of it or not. 

A spiritually-minded, consecrated, serious manhood and 
womanhood will produce the same quality among the 
j'ounger generation. This is a proven fact in the statisti- 
cal reports concerning the sons of the clergy. 

The family life of the laity must resemble more the 
family life of the clergy, if the young men are going to 
think seriously of the ministry. 

There must be the family altar. Family prayers must 
be a part of the routine daily life. The family pew at 
Church must be restored. The children must know that 
the normal life includes worship. Worship is an impor- 
tant part of one's duty. Sermons must be heard. Sun- 
days must be observed. Clergymen and their families 
naturally observe these things. They do not observe 
them because "they are paid to do them." Money cannot 
buy spiritual gifts. 

It is interesting to know that among our more than six 
thousand clergymen there is no outstanding superman. 
We are average people, the clerg)/ must be the same. 
The outstanding prophets of the ages might have been 
called by God for a particular work from some unusual 
surrounding. But the average minister must be called 
from an average environment. That average environment 
must be made more spiritual, more consecrated, and more 
sexious concerning God, Jesus Christ, and the Church. 

May the Bishops' Crusade do this, and more men will be 
seeking Holy Orders in the Church of Christ. "Like as 
the people, so are the priests," will be just as true as 
"like as the priest, so are the people." 



OUR OBLIGATION IN THE BISHOPS' CRUSADE. 



If the Christian religion is vital for us, we must see 
that it is an absolute necessity for all people. If this is 
the case, we have a duty towards all men without the 
Church. We have a duty to see that they are brought 
within the Church. And so we hope to be able to convince 
all of the people of this Church that Our Lord means what 
He said when He told us to make disciples of all people. 
Eveiy layman is obligated under his Christian vow to seek 
others for the Kingdom. 

Evangelism, under The Bishops' Crusade, is a move- 
ment to emphasize Soul Drive, first a personal rededication 
of ourselves to God and then an earnest efi'ort tO' bring 
pthers to the saving knowledge of Jesus Christ. 



The undersigned committee, duly appointed by the 
Bishop of the Diocese, to determine the number of Church 
Schools that have reached or exceeded their goals by con- 
tributions reported through the 1926 Lenten (Mite Box) 
Offering, and for the purpose of determining the Church 
School which reached the highest per cent bevond its goal, 
and thereby entitled to be designated "THE BANNER 
SCHOOL OF THE DIOCESE," met at the office of the 
Rev. W. R. Noe, Executive Secretary, Wilmington, N. C. 

After a careful examination of all reports received by' 
the Executive Secretary, the committee finds the follow-;; 
ing: 

1. The names of the fifteen Church Schools which ex- 
ceeded their g-oals are as follows: 

Goal Offering 

Wilmington, St. James $800.00 $880.02 

Woodviile. Grace Church 60.00 61.00 

Winterville, St. Luke's 2.5.00 26.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 300.00 350.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 100.00 ' 133.09 

New Bern, Christ Church 350.00 454.29 

Washington, St. Peter's 400.00 411.86 

Clinton, St. Paul's 50.00 55.19 

Southport, St. Phillip's 40.00 100.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 50.00 76.72 

MoHrehcad City, St. Andrews' 5.00 7.21 

Fairfield, All Saints 10.00 15.00 

Trenton, Grace Church 40.00 42.00 

Wrightsville, St. Andrews' 50.00 64.77 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 125.00 283.00 

2. The names of the eight Church Schools that have 
reached their goals are as follows: 

Goals Offernig 

Creswll, St. David's 125.00 125.00 

Greenville, St. Paul's 200.00 200.00 

Belhaven, St. James' 100 00 100.00 

Hamilton. St. Martin's 40.00 40.00 

Columbia, St. Andrews' 50.00 50.00 

Whiteville, Grace Church 25.00 25.00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's - 50.00 50.00 

Kinston, Christ Church 30.00 30.00 

3. The Church School giving the highest per cent be- 
yond its goal is St. Phillip's, Southport, this school ex- 
ceeding its goal by 150 per cent, and is thereby entitled 
to be designated "THE BANNER SCHOOL OF THE 
DIOCESE." 

The banner and certificates will be presented to the 
Parishes and Missions at the Annual Convention to be 
held at Elizabeth City. 

Respectfully submitted, 
MARION JAMES, 
LEONORA CANTWELL, 

Committee. 
January 10, 1927. 



WOMEN OF THE CHURCH OF THE ADVENT, 
WILLIAMSTON, ENTERTAIN. 



The women of the Church of the Adveint, Williamston, 
the evening of December 7th, 1926, gave a supper in hon- 
or of the men of the parish, which was largely attended 
and thoroughly enjoyed. 

After supper, the rector, the Rev, C. 0. Pardo, acting as 
toastmaster, called upon the church treasurer who an- 
nounced that the financial standing of the parish was bet-, 
ter than it had been for years, there being no debt un- 
paid locally, to the diocese, or to the general church, and 
that there was a balance on hand in the treasury. The 
membership has also grown steadily. 

Addresses were made by the Rev. Mr. Clark, of Cali- 
fornia; Messrs. A. D. Mizell, and S. S. Nash, of Tarboro; 
the Revs. A. J. Mackie, of Windsor; and James E. W. 
Cook, of Greenville. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



MEMORIALS 



MRS. LETITIA ST. GEORGE. 

Whereas, Almig-hty God in His wise providence has seen 
fit to take from our midst Mrs. Letitia St. George, wife of 
Captain J. E. St. Georgre; now, 

Therefore, Be it Resolved, By the women of St. Paul's 
Auxiliary, Clinton, N. C, that we extend to the bereaved 
husband and son our most sincere sympathy and assurance 
of our prayers to the God of all grace and comfort, that 
He may keep them in the fullness of His peace. 

MRS. J. R. HIATT, President. 
MRS. J. L. KERR, 
MRS. W. H. HERRING. 



JOHN GOLDSMITH BRAGAW, Sr. 

John Goldsmith Bragaw, Sr., died at his home in Wash- 
ington, N. C, on Monday morning at 1:40 o'clock, 
November 22, 1926, at the age of eighty-eight years and 
five months. At the time of his death, Mr. Biagaw was 
Senior Warden of St. Peter's Parish, a position that he 
had held for fifteen years next preceding his death For 
fifty-five consecutive years he was a member of the Vestry 
and for seventy-one years a member of St. Peter's Parish. 
For over half a century he was known throughout the 
Diocese of East Carolina as a leading churchman. 

Seldom is an opportunity given a man to serve his God 
and his church so long or so faithfully. A leader in every- 
thing that made for the development of God's kingdom on 
earth; a tower of strength in the moral, social and edu- 
cational betterment of his community. His life was a 
benediction to all with whom he came in touch. 

Now we do Resolve: 

First: That our Parish has in his death lost its pa- 
triarch. 

Second: That we condole with his family in their be- 
reavement at his departure. 

Third: That a copy of these resolutions be spread upon 
our minutes, a copy sent to the bereaved family, and a 
copy sent to the Mission Herald. 

E. K. WILLIS, 
Clerk of the Vestry, St. Peter's Parish, Washington, 
N. C. 



ELIZA WALKER MEARES. 

Eliza Walker Meares, bom November 11, 1863, entered 
into life eternal November 27, 1926. 

Born of distinguished ancestry, the daughter of Thomas 
D. and Jane Iredel Meares, and granddaughter of Gover- 
nor James Iredell, Miss Meares inherited all her ances- 
tor's had to transmit in charm and refinement of manners, 
in strength and clearness of intellect, in integrity and 
force of character, together with the "grace" which only 
comes as the gift of God, and which expresses itself in 
Christ-like consecration of life and devotion to service for 
others. 

For forty years, she gave herself without stint to her 
profession as a teacher, mainly among the less favoired 
among the children of Wilmington, N. C, by whom she 
was loved as only a teacher who sei-ves for the love of her 
work and its beneficiaries can be loved. To them and 
their parents, she was friend and comforter and helper 



above all, their champion and advocate wherever their in- 
terests were at stake or in question. And to none among 
her unaccountable friends will the sense of loss be greater 
than to these to whom she gave "not grudgingly nor of 
necessity*' the best she had to give. 

To those to whom she stood most closely through ties 
of family and intimate friendship, she will be remembered 
because of her rare charm of manner, her sunny optimism, 
her keen wit and kindly humor, and above all for her un- 
bounded generosity of self. In no period of her life have 
these characteristics been more prominent than during the 
past few months, which she spent mostly on a bed of pain 
with no certain promise of recovery but always with a 
brave face and sunny smile for all those who came within 
the light of her presence. Perhaps no words better sum 
up her outlook on life, its sunshine or its shadows, than the 
lines of Browning written near the close of his life, when 
according to his friends he wrote his own valedictory: 
"One who never turned his back but marched breast for- 
ward, 
Never doubted clouds would break, 
Never dreamed, though right were worsted, wrong would 

triumph. 
Held we fall to rise, are baifled to fight better. Sleep to 
wake." 



MRS. FANNIE C. SAUNDERS. 

"Lead kindly light amidst the encircling gloom, 
Lead thou me on/' 

On November 27, 1926, in the eighty-third year of her 
ag-e, as the beautiful Sabbath sun was sinking beneath the 
western hills, the Angel of Death touched and closed the 
eyelids of our dear friend, Mrs. Fannie C. Saunders, in 
perpetual sleep, and her soul passed on to the "Balm 
bveathing gardens of God." 

It is with the deepest sorrow that we chronicle the death 
of this "mother in Israel," who for so long had been a 
guide and inspiration as well as a faithful member of our 
Auxiliary. Her place cannot be filled. 

Therefore, Be it Resolved, 

First: That in the death of Mrs. Saunders, St. Petei's 
Auxiliary has suffered an irreparable loss; that her un- 
selfish performance of duty in all the relations of life, 
rendered her character an example "both sweet and ser- 
viceable." 

Second: That as an evidence of our esteem, the secre- 
tary be directed to place a copy of these resolutions on the 
records of St. Peter's Auxiliary; that a copy be sent to the 
Mission Herald, the Daily News, also to the family. 
MRS. H. BONNER, 
MRS. J. D. GRIMES, 
MRS. B. F. BOWERS, 

Committee on Resolutions, the Woman's Auxiliary, St. 
Peter's Church, Washington, N. C. 



EDWARD A. JOHNSON. 

In the death of Edward A. Johnson, on November 28, 
1926, our whole community, and particularly St. John's 
Episcopal Church, Pitt County, N. C, sustained a great 
loss. 

He was a faithful vestrjTnan of St. John's Church, and 
for many years, until his health failed, our efficient treas- 
urer. His punctual attendance at Sunday School, church 
services, and vestry meetings was most noticeable. His 
judgment was fine, and he always looked at things from 
a practical viewpoint. His advice was often asked; and, 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



15 



when followed, led to a successful and happy termination. 
He was a man of highest honor, integrity, and clearness 
of vision. His faithfulness to duty in all business matters 
was universally admired and fully appreciated. His in- 
fluemce for good is a lasting and fitting monument to his 
memory. 

We deeply sympathize with the bereaved family. 

We request that this memorial be spread upon the min- 
utes of the vestry, that a copy be sent to the family, and 
a copy to the Mission Herald. 

Wm. COBB WHITFIELD, M. D. 
W. J. H. LAUGHINGHOUSE, 
JOSEPH E. MAY, Sr. 

Committee. 



WHAT WE RECOMiMEND. 



L 



Several friends have asked us to recommend books that 
might be used to advantage by the inexpe.ienced laymen 
who, becoming interested in the Church during the Bish- 
ops' Crusade, would like to preach lay sermons. We make 
no claim to perfection in this line, but we should like to 
call attention to the following list of books, believing that 
the average layman will find them of an understandable 
and helpful nature: 

1. The Life of Christ. By Frederic W. Fa.rar. E. P. 
Button & Co., New York. Price about $1.50. 

This is one of the most popular of the books on the Life 
of Christ. The author has an attractive sti3'le, and gives 
to his readers an unforgettable picture of Christ. No 
person ought to preach or teach concerning the fundamen- 
tals of Christianity without first being conversant with 
the Life of Christ. 

2. What Think Ye of Christ ? By Bishop Graves. The 
New Werner Co., Akron, Ohio. Price about $1.00. 

This is a b"ok of sermons, written for lay-readers. 

3. The Episcopal Church, Its Message for Men of To- 
day. By the Rev. George P. Atwater, D. D. Morehouse 
Publishing Co., 1801-11 Pond du Lac Ave., Milwaukee, 
Wis. Paper 60c. Cloth $1.00. 

This is exceedingly informative as to the character of 
the Episcopal Church. It would make a fine present for 
every candidate for Confirmation. 

4. The Home Beautiful. By F. R. Miller. The West- 
minster Press, Philadelphia, Pa. Price about $1.50. 

This is a book of eighteen talks on home life. It is 
written with unusual insight and the gift of imagination. 
It leaves one closer to and more appreciative of home. It 
cannot be recommended too highly. 

5. Ten Short Stories From the Bible. Charles R. 
Brown. The Century Co., New York City. Price $1.50. 

No finer book, in this particular field, could be recom- 
mended to young people. It throbs with the pulse of 
youth, and commands one to a higher and nobler plane. 
Blessed is he who reads it and lives the high moral life 
portrayed there. 

6. The Making and Meaning of the Bible. Geo. Bar- 
clay. Geo. H. Doran Co., New York City. Price $1.75. 

For those who have trouble with modern scientific ques- 
tions and their religion, this book will be of inestimable 
benefit. It is written in the plainest sort of language, 
and any layman can easily understand it. 

7.. A Valid Christianity For Today. Charles D. Wil- 
liams, late Bishop of Michigan. The MacMillan Co., New 
York. Price $1.50 or $2.00. 

If you are troubled with the social problems of the day. 



read this book. It will lead you to refreshing brooks. 
Bishop Williams is one of the two or three brilliant social 
prophets that the Episcopal Church in America has pro- 
duced. 

8. Lux Mundi. Edited by Charles Gore. John W. 
Lovell Co., 142-150 Worth St., New York City. Is possibly 
out of print, but can usually be obtained at second-hand 
book stores for about $1.25. 

Is a series of essays on the religion of the Incamatioin. 
If the above books do not go deep enough for you, get this 
one. It goes to rock bottom. One must be of a studious 
mind to appreciate its worth and beauty; but where ap- 
preciated it is a classic, and has been since the first edition 
appeared in 1889. 

The above prices are only approximate, and are not 
guaranteed. We would recommend W. P. Blessing Co., 
208 South Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111., a book firm that will 
sell either second-hand or new books at the lowest possible 
cost. G. F. C. 



NOTES FROM ST. PAUL'S, GREENVILLE, N. C. 



(MISS BESSIE HAYDEN, Correspondent.) 

Our Sunday School held a Rally Day on the first Sunday 
in November. The collection that day was $100.01, which 
cleaved the debt on the Sunday School rooms. 

The Young People's Service League has been reorganized 
under the leadership of Mrs. Bruce Warren. Excellent 
work is being done, and Mrs. Watren is to be congratulat- 
ed on the many goiod things already accomplished. 

A Men's Provisional Club has been organized with Mr. 
F. C. Harding, chairman, and Mr. R. C. Stokes, Jr., secre- 
tary. 

The Greenville Township Sunday School Convention was 
held in our church from November 30 to December 1. Mr. 
D. W. Sims, of Raleigh, and Miss Mabel Lee Cooper, of 
New York City, were on the program. The various meet- 
ings were very well attended and much information was 
gained from the inspiring and interesting lectures. 

On the fiist Sunday in Advent twenty men and boys at- 
tended the Corporate Communion at 7:30 a. m. 

On St. Andrew's Day nineteen women attended the Holy 
Communion service at 10:00 a. m. Prayers and interces- 
sions containued until five o'clock. 



"DBUS VULT. 



The mediaeval Crusades for the recovery of the Holy 
Land from the Moslems were very largely a failure. Even 
their success were spoiled by the jealousies and cruelties 
of those who took part in them. And yet, the name of 
Crusade is still held in honor, and has always seemed ap- 
propriate to high and holy enterprises. How does this 
come to be? 

There was one great moment in the history of those 
first Crusades, when a saintly monk inspired by God stood 
before a vast multitude of men, and spoke to them of the 
cause in such burning words that they cried out with one 
voice "Deus Vult!"— It is the will of God! It was a mo- 
ment which for a short time of single purpose transformed 
all Christendom into one great fighting State.. It is the 
"Deus Vult" which makes the Crusade. 

We can have no doubt that It is the will of God now that 
the men and women of the Church should dedicate them- 
selves afresh to His service; that they may be able to 
"present to the world a living, breathing gospel of hope 
and love." 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



Ml 



O 



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Carolina Beach is on the Main Land. A Beach that you can drive your Automobile to the Water's 
edge. A good hard road from Wilmington. A new modern hotel now under construction that will be 
completed for the season of 1926. Lots are sold on reasonable terms and as an investment they are ideal. 
Information gladly given. Call or write any authorized representative. 

CAROLINA BEACH CORPORATION 

OWNERS AND DEVELOPERS OF 



CAROLINA BEACH 



Offices at CAROLINA BEACH, N. C. 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



OFFICERS:— S. C. Ogbum, President; W. F. Schaffner, Vice-President; W. W. Walsh, Vice-President; 

E. P. Yates, Vice-President; E. D. Turner, Secretary-Treasurer. 
DIRECTORS:— S. C. Ogburn, S. C. Clark, A. V. Nash, W. F. Shaffner, E. P. Yates, E. D. Turner, W. W. 

Walsh. 
J. L. BECTON, C. E., Wilmington, N. C, Engineer in charge of development. 
REFERENCES:— Any Bank or Mercantile Agency. 



I Ill IllilllillllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllW 



FIR!^T NATIONAL BANK i 

KINSTON, N. C. ! 

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Ayden Furniture Company 

HOME FURNISHERS and FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

"On the Hy-Way," Ayden, N, C. 

When passing through Ayden come in and let us 
show you our stock and quote prices. 



The Peoples Savings Bank 

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[ Will welcome your business. Four per cent Interest 

! Compounded Quarterly allowed on all deposits. 
23 Years Old. Capital and Surplus $250,000.00. 



Recent editions of The Church at Work have averaged 
580,000; nearly half this number are now mailed direct 
as second-class matter. Eight more dioceses have adopted 
this direct mailing plan. 



When in Elizabeth City, N. C. 
CALL ON 

First and Citizens National Bank 

They will be glad to serve you 
RESOURCES OVER FOUR MILLION DOLLARS 



W. A. BOWEN 

Dependable Merchandise 



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GOLDSBORO ,N C. | 

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J. C. WILLIAMS, 
Vice-Pres. & Treas. j 



^^3,^ 



TT M' 



CA 



(^■-^ 




r\ 



O 



V 






VOL. XLI. 




LiVi-ar^' 



No. 2. 

of ^C 



ian 



"28 





"%fl|intil)at- 



say-comf-lKfU22:i7 q 



%* 




PARTTAT< CONTFNTS 

Annual Kenor*- of Thompson 

Orphanacfe 
Final Li^t of Crusaders 
Tmr>or<-snt Resolution, Paore 5 
Rish'^r) Darst's Me^sHPfe 
Final Financial Statement for 1926 
Mr«. Adem's Lett?r 
Article ff^r Every Vestryman, 

Pae-e 13. 
P))Rhor) Murray's Message to Young 

People, Page 14 




february, 1927 



O 



\J 



r\ 



\J 



A 



O 



V 



Published by the Diocese of East Carolina at Ay den, N. C. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



St. Mary^s School 

A JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Rev. WAKREN W. WAY, Rector. 



An Episcopal School for Girls. Four years High School and two 
years College Courses. Accredited. Special courses: Music, Art, 
Expression, Home Economics, Business. 

MODERN EQUIPMENT— 20-ACRE CAMPUS. 

Advent session opened Sept. 15, 1926. For catalogue address 

A. W. TUCKER, Business Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 




ALTARS,PULPITS,LECTEfts^i,FOKTS,FABR!CS,EMBR0IDERIES.||| 

Memorial Table ts, St aimed Glass Windows.^ 




THE NATIONAL COUNCIL 

Department of 'Religious Education, 

281 Fourth Ave., New York City. 



The Editor of the Mission Herald, Ayden, N. C. 

Dear Sir: — In case you have not seen the Churchman's Kalendar Daily 
Bible Readings, I am now taking the liberty of sending you a complimentary 
copy herewith. It has occurred to us that you might like to mention the 
Kalendar in your next issue. 

During the past two years 75,000 copies of the Kalendar have gone out 
from the book stores, which, I think, is a pretty good indication that people 
are hungry for some definite help in Bible reading. You will, of course, 
notice that the general plan of the Kalendar makes the reading topical from 
Advent to Trinity, and very largely chronological from Trinity to Advent. 
We find that one method appeals to some and the other method to others, 
and the topical method seems the more suited to the first part of the Chris- 
tian year, when the great themes of our Lord's life are presented. 

Very sincerely yours, 

THOMAS A. CONOVER, 
Secretary, Committee on Daily Bible Readings. 

(The Churchman's Kalendar for 1927 may be obtained at the rate of 
5c each, or $3.50 per hundred, from the Book Store, 281 Fourth Ave., New 
York City.— Editor.) 



OBJECT OF THE BISHOPS' ('RUSADE. 



"Our object is to bring to the Church a fresh realization of its power 
and mission; to kindle again in the hearts of its members a passion for the 
souls of men; to arouse the Church from its lethargy and send if out clad 
in the shining armour of a great faith to complete the task committed to its 
hands; to sound a note of sacrificial devotion to a cause immeasurably bigger 
than ourselves." 

BISHOP DARST. 



The Bishop Tuttle Training School for Negro girls, on the campus lof 
St. Augustine's School, Raleigh, N. C, has enrolled three new students in 
this its second ^year. Two have had junior college training and have taught. 
The third has been housekeeper in the home of the famous James B. Duke. 



Virginia 
Episcopal School 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 



Prepares boys at cost for Col- 
lege and University. Modern 
equipment. Healthy location in 
the mountains of Virginia. Cost 
moderate, made possible through 
generosity of founders. For cat- 
alogue apply to 

Rev. Wm. G. Pendleton, D. D. 

Rector. 



Church Furnishings 



Gold, Silver and Brass 

Church and Chancel 

Furniture 

Write for Catalogrue for 
Episcopal Churches 

W. & E. SCHMIDT CO. 

308 Third Street, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



The Bank of Edenton 

SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 
Bank With us by Mail 
[ JULIAN WOOD, President. 
" W. 0. ELLIOTT, Vice-President 
D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 



II 





Church Vestments 

Cassocks, Surplices, Stoles 

Embroideries, Clerical Suits, 
Silks, Cloths, Fringes. 

HATS, RABATS, COLLARS 

Cox Sons & Vining 

131-133 East 23rd St. NEW YORK 



NORFOLK-SOUTHERN 

Passenger Schedules 

From Greenville, N. C. 
Effective January 1, 1927. 
Northbound: 

1:35 A. M.— Norfolk Sleeper. 
10:08 A. M.— Norfolk. 
6:30 P. M.— Washington. 
Southbound: 

3:20 A. M.— Raleigh. 
9:25 A. M.— Raleigh. 
4:48 P. M.— Raleigh. 

J. L. HASSELL, Agent, 



The Mission Herald. 



Vol. XLI. 



AYDEN, N. C, FEBRUARY, 1927. 



No, 2. 



EXTRACTS FROM ANNUAL REPORT OF 
THOMPSON ORPHANAGE 



GREAT IMPROVEMENT IS NOTED-NOBLE BEQUESTS MADE 



Happy Children. 

This year marks the fortieth anniversary of the Thomp- 
son Orphanage, and the group of ten handsome brick 
buildings crowning the crest of the Orphanage campus 
must be a source of deep gratification to all the friends 
and supporters of the institution. 

But even more gratifying than this imposing array of 
new buildings is the happy and contented appearance of 
the children. 

Children are Generous. 

The Lenton mite box offering amounted to $102.20. 
Our Forward Movement quota was $100.00; $130.00 was 
pledged and $206.24. The children have also contributed 
to the Florida Relief Fund, the "Fifty Neediest Cases" in 
Charlotte through the Observer Christmas Fund, and to 
the Near East Relief. 

School Advantages. 

All children above the second grade attend the city 
schools and are benefitted not only by the superior equip- 
ment but also by the many broadening contacts. There 
are 68 in Public Schools; 20 in High School and 48 in the 
grammar grades. Miss Nail has 40 in the Orphanage 
school. Only four of our children are pre-school age. 

East Carolina Falls Short. , 

The financial report discloses that Western North Caro- 
lina with sixteen children at a net per year capita of 
$290.00 or total cost of $4,640.00 has only paid about 
$1,900.00 during 1926, and East Carolina with twenty- 
eight children at $290.00 or cost of $8,120.00 has only paid 
about $6,000.00. 

' 60 Per Cent Non-Episcopal. 

The capacity of the Orphanage is 112 and this number 
of children has been maintained throughout the year. 
There are 63 girls and 49 boys; 28 from East Carolina, 16 
from Western North Carolina and 68 from North Caro- 
lina. During the year 17 children have been dismissed, 
12 to homes of relatives, two to Valle Crucis School and 
three to good positions in Charlotte. 17 have been re- 
ceived, six from East Carolina, two from Western North 
Carolina and nine from North Carolina. 83 applications 
were filed during the past year. Many more were receiv- 
ed but unentered because of the impossibility of consider- 
ing them. About 40 per cent of our present number of 
children are from Church families and about 60 per cent 
are non-Episcopal. Two or three of our children who 
were taken at a very early age have developed into sub- 



normal cases, requiring- an examination by Dr. Crane and 
possible transferring of them to Caswell Training School. 

Have Good Health. 

The Sadie Tucker Williamson Infirmary has cared for 
310 sick children during the year. These were all light 
cases. There have been no epidemics of sickness. There 
have been performed eight operations for tonsils and ade- 
noids, one for appendicitis, one for glands of the neck; also 
two broken arms and one fractured heel. Dr. Hunter has 
given careful attention to all of the sick, and to him and 
to Miss Robison, the nurse, we owne the general good 
health of the children. 

Noble Bequests. 
During the year several substantial gifts have been 
received toward both the current fund and the endow- 
ment Fund. 

In November a grant of $50.00 per month was made to 
the Orphanage from Mecklenburg County. 

Last April a check for $1,093.53 was received from the 
Duke Endowment. 

In the will of Dr. R. H. Lewis of Raleigh, the Orphan- 
age was left $5,000 00 to be known as "The Martha Hos- 
kins Lewis Memorial." 

By the will oc Mr. William H. Williamson a trust fund 
amounting to $209,024.88 was created of which the Or- 
phanage is to receive 40-210ths of the income. It is 
noted that this trust should yield a gross annual income 
of about $10,300, which is subject to a commission of 
2 1-2 per cent. 

Mrs. Porter Stedman and her sister. Miss Mary Ly- 
brook, of Winston-Salem have given $800.00, $400.00 in 
1926 and $400.00 in 192i7, to aid deserving children to 
secure a college education or to assist them in getting a 
start in business or professional life. 

Gratitude. 

We feel that the past year at the Thompson Orphanage 
has been marked by many splendid forward steps in the 
care of our children and in advantages secured for them. 
For all of these the affectionate gratitude of our boys and 
girls and all of us at the Orphanage goes out to the Board 
and Executive Committee and all the devoted friends and 
loyal supporters. 

May God continue to further all our efforts on behalf 
of the children entrusted to our care. 

W. H. WHEELER, Superintendent, 
Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte, N. C. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



FINAL LIST OF DIOCESAN CRUSADERS. 



Diocesan Crusaders will cairy the Crusade as far as 
possible into every parish and mission of the Diocese. 
They are drafted for service in the same way as the Na- 
tional Crusaders. Subjects for the six sermons of the Cru- 
sade, with digest of each message recommended will be 
furnished in due time by Diocesan Headquarters. 

Note: The Dean of the Convention of Colored Church 
workers has been requested to select the Crusaders for 
the parishes and missions of his Convocation. 

February 7-13, Inclusive. 

Gatesville, St, Mary's, Rev. E. T. Jillson. 

February 14-20, Inclusive. 

Atkinsom, St. Thomas', Rev. Howard Alligood. 

Ayden, St. James', Rev. E. W. Halleck. 

Aurora, Holy Cross, Rev. C. E. Williams. 

Bath, St. Thomas', Rev. H. D. Cone. 

Beaufort, St. Paul's, Rev. F. D. Dean. 

Belhaven, St. James', Rev. G. F. Cameron. 

Chocowinity, Trinity. Rev. H. M. Green. 

Clinton, St. Paul's, Rev. J. Hartley, Ph. D. 

Creswell, St. David's, Rev. A. Miller. 

Edenton, St. Paul's, Rev. S. Gardner. 

Farmville, Emmanuel, Rev. G. F. Hill. 

Goldsboro, St. Stephemi's, Rev. G. H. Madara. 

Greenville, St. Paul's, Rev. C. 0. Pardo. 

Grifton, St. John's, Rev. A. J. Mackie. 

Hertford, Holy Trinity, Rev. A. Boog-her. 

New Bern, Christ Church, Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D. 

Plymouth, Grace, Rev. W. R. Noe. 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's, Rev. J. N. Bynum. 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's, Rev. G. W. Lay, D. C. L. 

Woodville, Grace, Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D. 

Warsaw, Calvary, Rev. Preston Barr. 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas', Rev. W. 0. Cone. 

Sunbui7y, St. Peter's, Rev. H. G. England. 

February 21-25, Inclusive. 

Winton, St. John's, Rev. J. B. Gibble. 

February 21-27 Inclusive. 

Fayetteville, St. John's, Rev. James E. W. Cook. 

Hamilton, St. Martini's Rev. C. E. Williams. 

Hope Mills, Christ, Rev. A. J. Mackie. 

Jessama, Zion, Rev. G. F. Hill. 

Roper, St. Luke's, Rev. E. T. Jillson. 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents', Rev. J. N. Bynum. 

Southport, St. Philip's, Rev. H. D. Cone. 

Williamston, Advent, Rev. E. W. Halleck. 

Windsor, St. Thomas', Rev. A. Miller. 

Burgaw, St. Mary's, Rev. S. Gardner. 

Columbia, St. Andrew's, Rev. G. H. Madara. 

Fairfield, All Saints', Rev. H. Alligood. 

Faison, St. Gabiiel's, Rev. W. R. Noe. 

Lumberton, Trinity, Rev. G. W. Lay, D. C. L. 

Swan Quarter, Calvary, Rev. H. G. England. 

Trenton, Grace, Rev. G. F. Cameron. 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's, Rev. A. Boogher. 

Sladesville, St. John's, Rev. H. M. Green. 

NOTE. Offerings will be taken at all of the services. 
These offerings will be applied; (1) To the traveling 
and other necessary expenses of the Crusaders; (2) To 
the local publicity expenses; (3) The balance to be sent to 



the Treasurer of the Diocesan Commission to be forward- 
ed to the Treasurer of the National Commission. 

April 18-24, Inclusive. 

Whiteville, Grace Church, Rev. James E. W. Cook. 

Missions will be conducted at the following places, al- 
though dates and names of missioners cannot be given at 
this writing, as arrangements are incomplete: 

Kinston, St. Mary's. 

Lake Landing, St. George's. 

Pollocksville Mission 

Yeatesville, St. Matthews's. 



MEETING OF MEN'S CLUB, St. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



Mr. Geo. C. Royall Given High Tribute. 



The Men's Club of St. Stephen's Church held its month- 
ly meeting January 13th, at the Parish House. The spe- 
cial feature of the evening was a dinner served by Circle 
No, 1 of the Woman's Auxiliary. President Claiborne 
Royall was in the chair, and after routine business was dis- 
posed of, Dr. J. N. Johnson was introduced as toastmaster. 
Dr. Johnson, with the aid of the Executive Committee, had 
arranged a pleasant surprise in the form of a testimonial 
of honor and affection for the Senior Warden, Mr. George 
C. Royall, who was altogether unprepared for the express- 
ion of esteem in which he is held by the men of the con- 
gregation. 

Dr. Johnson delivered with deep feeling an address in 
which he sketched an outline of the parish life in the years 
that he had been a member of St. Stephen's, with an ap- 
preciation of personal and ecclesiastical relations continued 
throughout this period with the honored guest of the even- 
ing. 

After an appropriate song by the members, sung stand- 
ing, the rector was called upon to give official recognition 
to the services of Mr. Royall to the parish. The relations 
between the two men have been so close that the speaker's 
task was a difficult one. The rector confined himself to 
a brief resume of the records contained in the famous 
Parish Register of St. Stephen's Church, which has been 
faithfully kept by the clergy in charge since the founda- 
tion nearly seventy-five years ago. He told how the late 
Mrs. Margaret Royall's name appeared on its pages in the 
early years, and how it had been followed by those of her 
children to the fourth generation, the last entry having 
been made little more than a year ago. The new Parish 
House, erected last summer, was given as a memorial of 
this devoted mother by Mr. Royall. Various entries of the 
Register were cited to show his continuous participation 
in the life and affairs of the congregation, as communicant, 
vestryman, treasurer, superintendent of the Sunday School, 
and finally as Senior Warden. 

The toastmaster then insisted on hearing from the guest 
whom all delighted to honor, and Mr. Royall responded 
very briefiy, in graceful and heartfelt words of apprecia- 
tion. After the singing of "Auld Lang Syne," the me- 
morial dinner party was brought to a close. 



Bishop Charles Fiske of the Diocese of Central New 
York preached to an appreciative congregation in St. 
John's, Fayetteville, N. C, Sunday, January 30, using for 
his subject the story of Christ as told by St. John. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



OF IMPORTANCE TO MISSIONARY CENTERS IN 
EAST CAROLINA. 



Resolution of the Executive Council. 



The following' resolution was adopted by the Executive 
Council at its meeting on Thursday, January 27th, 1927, 
Wilmington, N. C: 

"Resolved, that any adopted scale of appropriations for 
stipends of Clei'gy sei*ving Parishes or Missions within the 
Diocese of East Carolina shall be subject, during the years 
1927 and 1928, to the following conditions: 

"First: That at the end of the first six months of 1927 
the Committee on Appropriations shall secure from the 
treasurer of the diocese a statement of any deficits in 
payment on the apportionments of the budget for the first 
six months, together with a statement from the treasurers 
of all such Parishes and Missions as to their standing to 
that date, in meeting their agreed share of their clerical 
stipends. After receipt of such information, the Commit- 
tee on Appropriations shall notify any Parish or Mission 
showing a deficit in either obligation that, unless such 
deficit is made up and all obligations paid by the end of 
the year, the Committee on Appropriations will be forced 
to lower the appropriations for such Parish or Mission 
for 1928 in an amount equal to the defiicit for year 1927. 

"Second: That, in like manner, any Parish or Mission 
that shall fail in the payment of its apportionment or its 
agreed clerical stipend during the second six months of 
said year, shall be notified on or before February 1st that, 
unless its said defiicit shall be made up and its obliga- 
tions for said year paid before April 1st, 1928, the Com- 
mittee on Appropriations will be forced to lower the ap- 
propriation for such Parish or Mission for 1928 an amount 
equal to the deficit for the year 1927. 

"Third: That the Executive Council shall be given dis- 
cretionary powers in the application of this rule." 



DELINQUENT WOMEN. 



Six hundred and sixty-six women were committed to 
jails in North Carolina in the year 1924, from twenty-one 
counties. 

This gives an idea of the number of delinquent women 
for whom no corrective treatment is being given. In the 
jails they sit in, idleness. They frequently lack the medi- 
cal attention that practically all of them need. They are 
released to the community in no way better than they 
were when the law took them in hand. Neither the indi- 
vidual offender nor the community prcfits by our present 
methods of treating delinquent women. 

The State Board of Charities and Public Welfare is 
charged by law with the duty of recommending to the 
Legislature, among other things, "the creation of neces- 
sary institutions," and the Board is recommending the es- 
talblishment of a Farm Colony for Delinquent Women. 

A bill authorizing the establishment of a farm colony to 
eventually care for four hundred women will be offered 
the General Assembly of 1927. 

The establishment of such an institution has been adopt- 
ed by the Legislative Council of Women as one of the five 
measures which it is advocating. The Noi'th Carolir.a con- 
ference for Social Service has approved and advanced such 
a proposition for several years. 

The need for such an industrial institution, has long 
been recognized. The women who are serving sentences 
in jails are costing large sums of money. The average 
amount spent per day on their fcod alone is 75c. If this 



were spent on keeping them in an institution where they 
could be made to work and to become at least partially 
self-supporting, where they were given adequate medical 
attention, industrial and moral training, we might hope 
for good results. 

A farm colony for women is the type of institution 
which would make such conditions possible. Every effort 
would be made to make industry the dominant characteris- 
tic. It would be maintained not only to restrain and dis- 
cipline, but also to train, rehabilitate and restore, to which 
end, industry contributes fundamentally. 

It is clearly apparent that our methods of dealing with 
women who have been convicted of offenses against the 
law are inadequate. 

Most of them are in county jails, poorly supervised 
work-houses, or county homes for the aged and infirm. 
They are surrounded by idleness, disease, low mentality, 
and everything that appeals to the worst in human nature. 
Some of them are turned loose on unsupervised suspended 
sentences or conditional suspended sentences that are not 
merely futile, but are positively vicious. One of these 
conditional sentences, which if often pronounced is a term 
of so many days in jail, unless the woman leaves town 
within a given time. By imposition of such sentences, 
Raleigh sends her women offenders, mostly prostitutes, to 
Durham, Durham to Greensboro, Greensboro to Charlotte, 
and so on till the vicious circle starts all over again. 

Practically all of the women, serving sentences, are 
under the supervision of men. It has been pretty general- 
ly recognized that women offenders should be separated 
from men and placed under the supervision of women. 
Only two jails that we know of employ matrons to care 
for women prisoners. 

One of the provisions for the farm colony for women 
would be that the "superintendent should be a properly 
trained, well educated and spiritually-minded woman. 

Provisions have been made, in many ways, for the em- 
ployment of the men serving sentences in North Carolina. 
The State should recognize equally the necessity of provid- 
ing industrial emploj ment for women. We can not afford, 
from an economic and a social standpoint to avoid the 
question any longer. North Carolina should do some con- 
structive work with this class of offenders. The farm 
colony for women offenders should be made a reality by 
the General Assembly of 1927.— K. B. J. in N. C, Public 
Welfare Progress. 



ST. PAUL'S PARISH, GREENVILLE, N. C. 



(MISS BESSIE HAYDEN, Correspondent.) 

During December the Parish Guilds held a joint bazaar, 
which was quite a success. 

The Sunday School sent to the Indians in a parish in 
South Dakota, a Christmas box, which contained a joyful 
and a useful gift for twenty-six children. 

Midnight service, with administration of the Lord's 
Supper, was held on Christmas eve, and watchnight ser- 
vice on New Year's eve. On New Year's morning our 
rector preached an appropriate sermon on a motto text 
for the year, "We Will Not go Back From Thee." 

The congregation unanimously re-elected the Vestry for 
1926 for another year. 

On January 7th, from 10:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M., the 
women of the parish held a Day of Intercession and Prayer 
for the Bishops' Crusade. On January 21st, both men and 
women met for the same purpose. The day was closed 
with special prayers by the rector. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO DRAFT 

PROGRAMS FOR RURAL CHURCH WORK 

IN EAST CAROLINA. 



There was held at Greenville, N. C, April 7, 1926, a 
Conference of the Rural Clergy of the diocese. Rural 
Church problems, possibilities and opportunities were ably 
presented by the speakers. At the conclusion of the 
Conference, a resolution was passed, asking for the ap- 
pointment of a committee to draft a diocesan and a parish 
program for rural work to be submitted to the Bishop and 
Executive Council for consideration. 

The committee appointed met at Washington, May 
14th, and drafted the following programs which it 
wishes to submit to the Bishop and Executive Council at 
this time: 

Diocesan Program. 

The committee recommends: 

1. That the Diocese of East Carolina endorse the fol- 
lowing resolutions of the General Convention of 1925: 

"Resolved, the House of Bishops concurring, that the 
General Convention calls the attention of the whole 
Church to the nation-wide importance of the work of the 
Church in Rural Sections, that the Church may more suc- 
cessfully labor to plant the Kingdom of God in our Rural 
Fields; and be it further 

Resolved, the House of Bishops concurring, that this 
General Convention urge upon all diocesan authorities 
the fundamental value of 

(1) Spreading the Church in rural America. 

(2) Promoting the prestig-e of rural Church work. 

(3) Establishing and holding diocesan, regional and 
national conferences for rural clergy. 

(4) Raising the standard of salaries for rural clergy. 

(5) Placing rural work training courses in the curri- 
cula of our seminaries; and 

Be it Further Resolved, the House of Bishops concurr- 
ing, that the General Convention recommends to the pro- 
vinces that they consider the advisability of establishing 
rural work commissions. 

"The House of Bishops concurred with the House of 
Deputies." 

2. That a strong presentation of Rural Work be made 
at our annual Convention. 

3. That an annual diocesan conference of the rural 
clergy be held. 

4. That the diocese provide a lending library on Rural 
Work available to all clergy. 

5. That the diocese make a survey of its rural work 
and select three missions, or points, of different character 
and urge a three year experimental scientific program in 
each — the diocese giving all administrative and financial 
assistance possible, especially frequent visitations by the 
Bishop and other diocesan officers. 

6. That the diocese give consideration with a view to 
giving more staff assistance where needed and when justi- 
fied. We note the difficulty cf developing properly, be- 
cause of the size of soime missionary fields, and we urge 
upon our diocesan authorities the necessity of making ad- 
justments wherever possible and having the best men ob- 
tainable in the most promising places with adequate sup- 
port. 

7. That the diocese set forth a suggestive annual par- 
ish program for rural parishes which will cover the fields 
of evangelism, religious education, social service and fi- 



nance (which shall include an annual preaching mission, 
well prepared for, a teacher training institute or daily 
vacation Bible school, social features or festivals, an every 
member canvass); this program to present a standard as 
an objective for each church or community. 

A Parish Program. 

The building of a program must of necessity be a very 
practical matter. Yet the idealistic should ever be kept 
in mind in planning our work. A program should be 
something by which ideals can be made real and put into 
life itself. 

It is, therefore, our purpose to suggest a parish stan- 
dard, and methods by which a parish may realize that 
standard. 

But it must be understood, first of all, that a program 
for any church should be the outgrowth of a study of the 
community. All suggestions made here must be adjusted 
to suit local conditions. 

I. A Standard. 

1. A pastor living in the community. 

2. Pastor devoting full time to: the community. 

II. Parish. 

1. The Church working systematically to extend it's 
work to the limits of the community. 

2. The Church working systematically to serve all 
classes and racial elements not receiving adequate relig- 
ious training. 

III. Plant Equipment. 

1. A Church with adequate seating capacity for the 
community and an organ. 

2. A parish house with auditorium, for social and re- 
creational purposes, with stage, movable chairs, and 
piano; class rooms with chairs and tables suitable to pu- 
pils, and black-boards and charts and maps; a steroptican 
or motion picture machine; a kitchen roomy and properly 
furnished; portable tables for auditorium. 

3. Sanitary toilets on the church property. 

IV. Spiritual. 

1. One hundred per cent of members active in: 

(a) Church attendance. 

(b) Making regular communion. 

(c) Contributing something to current and benevolent 
budget. 

(d) Participation in one or more organizations of the 
church; i. e.. Men's Club, Woman's Auxiliary, group study 
class, league, Bible class, church school, etc. 

(e) Having every child in the community attending 
church school. 

(f) Seeing that every person in the community is 
baptized, confirmed, or feeling the influence of the church. 

(g) Community organizations for civic, educational 
and public welfare. 

V. Material. 

1. Parish budget adequate to provide a comfortable 
living for the pastor — a living as good, at least, as that of 
the average communicant — say a salary of not less than 
$1800 with house. 

2. A pastor's fund to provide gasoline, travelling ex- 
penses, postage, etc. 

3. Budget to provide music, lights, fuel, janitor, and 
keep the church buildings in as good repair as the average 
home. 

4. A charity fund for community needs. 

5. A missionary budget equal, at least, to three foui-ths 
of the current budget. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



(d) 
(e) 
(f) 
(g) 



Means and Methods. 

To obtain this standard, the following things are recom- 
mended as being absolutely essential to any adequate pro- 
gram: 

1. A scientific survey to obtain definite information as 
to the religious status, the spiritual, human and material 
resources of the community and facilities available. (The 
program must be built around this information.) 

2. Evangelism. 

(a) A systematic evangelistic campaign aimed to reach 
every individual in the community — an organized and 
worked preaching mission, well prepared for. 

(b) A definite attempt to be made to bring church 
school pupils into church membership by providing proper 
instruction periods for this particular purpose. (Confir- 
mation classes.) 

(c) Services every Sunday. 

(d) Co-operation with outside agencies working for 
world-wide evangelism. 

3. Religious Education. 

(a) A church school maintained throughout the year. 

(b) Church school enrollment of every child in the 
community not in other church schools. 

(c Provision for teacher training class or institute. 
Definite training for leaders in church work. 
Religious drama. 

Illustrated lectures and motion pictures. 
A definite parish program adopted annually by the 
congregation. 

4. Social Service. 

(a) A definite assumption of responsibility for some 
part of the church's work by at least 50 per cent of the 
congregation. 

(b) Social and recreational activities for all ag'es and 
classes of people in the congregation and community. 
(This can be done by drama, plays, picnics, luncheons, 
parties, games, etc.) 

(c) Make community service a definite part of the 
Church's work by study of social and moral conditions of 
the community and co-operate with all agencies, secular 
and religious, for moral, social and economic uplift. 

5. Finance. 

(a) Adoption of a definite annual budget for current 
and benevolent expenses by the entire congregation. 

(b) Make an annual every-member canvass on the 
basis of the budget adopted, canvassing every member 
and adherent. 

(c )Make use of the duplex envelope system. 

(d) Prepare for the canvass by a program of informa- 
tion. 

For various features suggested there should be appro- 
priated to the Church Seasons suitable to lend environ- 
ment, teaching and emphasis. 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. N. BYNUM, 
G. F. CAMERON, 
THEODORE PARTRICK, Jr. 

Committee. 
The progTams were accepted as the goal for the diocese; 
and on motion item No. 5 of this report was referred to 
the Committee on Evaluation. 



m "Each new generation makes some transforming dis- 
covery in God's Book. What is 'Stewardship' but God's 
Word for this g-eneration?" 



The Bishops' Crusade 

SjT. PETER'S CHURCH, WASHINGTON, N. C, 
February 6th to 11th, Inclusive. 

A nation-wide movement under the direction 
of the National Commission on Evangelism. 

Its aim is the re-dedication of all the people of 
the Church to the service of their Lord and 
Master, especially in the spread of the Gospel. 

THE CRUSADERS 

The Rt. Rev. Frederick Foote Johnson, D. D, 

Bishop of Missouri. 

The Key. H. F. Kloman, Cumberland, Md. 

These crusaders have been sent to Washington 
by the National Commission on Evangelism. 
Bishop Johnson comes all the way from Missouri, 
and Mr. Kloman comes directly from Elizabeth 
City, where an unusually successful revival was 
experienced during the past week. Both are emi- 
nent preachers. 

THE PROGRAM 

Sunday, February 6th 
8:00 A. M. — Holy Communion. 
11:00 A. M. — Morning Prayer and Sermon. 
7:30 P. M. — Evening Prayer and Sermon. 

Preacher: The Rt. Rev. Frederick F. John- 
son, D. D. 

Week Days, February 7th to 11th, Inclusive 

12:06-12:30 P. M.— Service in the Strand Theatre for men. 
Speaker: The Rev. H. F. Kloman. 
3:00 P. M.— Conference in St. Peter's Church. 

Leader: The Rev. H. F. Kloman. 
8 :00 P. M. — Mass Meeting in St. Peter's Church 

Preacher: The 'Rt. Rev. Frederick F. John- 
son, D. D. 
. .Holy Communion at 7:30 A. M., Wednesday and Friday. 
While the Bishops' Crusade is addressed pri- 
marily to the people of the Episcopal Church, any 
others who care to attend the meetings and con- 
ferences will be cordially welcomed. 



CHURCH WINDOW ILLUMINATED. 



Through the generosity of the young women of the Al- 
tar Guild, the altar-window of St. Paul's Epicopal Church, 
Greenville, N. C, has been illuminated. Strong electric 
lights placed outside the building bring into relief the 
beautiful stained glass representation of Christ, the Good 
Shepherd, carrying a lamb in His arms. The beauty of 
the chancel has been much increased by this thoughtful 
and loving act of the members of the Guild. 



"To have is to owe, not to own." 



Date on label shows when your subsc;iption expires. 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



5[he iHisstan Heralb 

ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly at 

AYDEN, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance. 
Single Copies 10 Cents. 

EDITORIAL STAFF: 

Editor: 

REV. GEORGE F. CAMERON, B.A., B.D. 

Contributing Editors: 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D.D. 
REV. R. B. DRANE, D.D. 
REV. JAMES E. W. COOK, 
MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN. 



Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, Ay- 
den, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their addresses, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Manager, 
giving when necessary, both the old and new addresses. 

Subscribers wishing to discontinue their subscriptions 
should so notify the Manager, as an absence of such notifi- 
cation is considered a continuance of the subscription. 
■ All articles for publication should reach the Business 
Manager by the 25th of the month. New subscriptions, 
renewals, requests for change of address and copy for ad- 
vertisements should be sent to 

REV. GEORGE F. CAMERON, 

Ayden, N. C. 

SPILT MILK. 

It will be seen from the financial statement, printed 
elsewhere, that the balance unpaid by several parishes and 
missions on the apportionment for the year 1926 amounts 
to $8,236.72. Sometime ago the Diocese of East Carolina 
pledged to the University of the South the sum of $8,457 
for its Supplemental Endowment; and so far has been un- 
able to redeem that pledge. If every parish and mission 
in the diocese had paid its Apportionment for the year 
1926, East Carolina would now lack only a few dollars 
having enough to liquidate the University of the South 
indebtedness. 

Thanks to the New Year! We can use it to make re- 
pairs. — G. F. C. 



WHAT IT MEANS. 

The resolution adopted on January 27th, by the Execu- 
tive Council, is of greatest importance and may have far 
reaching effect. It is printed in full on page 5. What 
does it mean? Boiled down, it means that the salaries of 
the missionary clergy in East Carolina shall be reduced 
to the extent that their parishes and missions fail to pay 
their Diocesan Apportionment. 

Is such a resolution sound? Well, it does not portray 
ideal conditions. Yet, it is practical; it is built around a 
fact and a recognized economic principle, namely, the dio- 
cese cannot pay the salaries of her missionary clergy un- 
less she has sufficient income. 



It ought to encourage the missionary parishes and mis- 
sions to pay their Diocesan Apportionment in full, in order 
to save their pastors any financial embarrassment. 

It might be added that the missionary clergy are those 
who receive a part of their salary from the diocese. 

G. F. C. 



PERSONAL MESSAGE FROM OUR BISHOP. 

In response to a request, I am sending this personal 
word at the opening of the Bishops' Crusade. 

The whole Church has responded with fine enthusiasm 
to the call of the Crusade and while you read this message 
the Crusade will be in actual operation in every part of the 
country. 

Three hundred Bishops, Priests, laymen and women 
will be carrying the message of the Crusade to at least 
two hundred cities and towns in the eighty-seven dioceses 
of the United States. 

These Crusaders are going with fine faith and courage 
and they are carrying a great message. 

Are you ready for the message ? 

Are we satisfied to receive and hold the message for 
ourselves or are we so clearing out the channels of our 
lives that the message may go through us to others ? 

Please remember that the Crusade is not simply an 
enlistment of three hundred Crusaders, but an enlistment 
of every man, woman and child in the Church; not simply 
an enlistment for the Epiphany Season, 1927, but a renew- 
al of our baptismal and confirmation vows that can mean 
nothing less than an enlistment for life. 

God grant that the clergy and laity of our Church may 
so prepare and make ready the way that the Crusade may 
in deed and in truth bring a fresh realization of the Power 
of Christ in you and through you. Men and women need 
Him. He is ready and anxious to supply the need. Shall 
we not find a road to those needy ones through the chan- 
nels of our consecrated and surrendered lives? 

THOMAS C. DARST, Chairman, 
National Commission on Evangelism. 



"SEWANEE" 

(The University of the South.) 



A towered city set within a wood, 

Far from the world, upon a mountain's crest; 
There storms of life burst not, nor cares intrude, 

There Learning dwells and Peace is Wisdom's guest. 

Builded by faith, and hallowed to fulfill 

Fair prophet- vision, hid from common sight; 

A shining city, set upon a hill 

Above the world, to send forth truth and light. — Ex. 



A SYMBOLIC FINISH. 



At the service commemorating the twenty-fifth anni- 
versary of his consecration as a bishop. Bishop Brent, in 
speaking of the influences upon his life, included the fol- 
lowing beautiful incident: 

"Fr. Osborne was of another type. He was filled with 
restless energy, a busy pastor rather than a student. Dur- 
ing the past year, he entered into rest at an advanced age. 
Shortly before sunset, as he sat with his nurse during the 
long evenings, he would preach sermons to imaginary 
congregations, and at the close, in faltering tones, ask his 
nurse: "Do you think I have helped any one today?" 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



FINAL STATEMENT OF AMOUNTS PAID ON DIO- 
CESAN APPORTIONMENT FOR 1926. 

Paid by Paid by 



Location 



Parish 



Apportionment Parish Ch. School 
FIRST 



Edenton, St. Paul's 

Wilmington, St. James' _ 
Woodville, Grace Church 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 

Winterville, St. Luke's — - 



SECOND 



Creswell, St. David's 

Elizabeth City, Christ's Church 

Fayetteville, St. John's 

*Gold3boro, St. Stephen's 

♦Greenville, St. Paul's 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 

^Kinston, St. Mary's 

*New Bern, Christ Church 

♦Plymouth, Grace Church 

Washington, St. Peter's 

♦Wilmington, St. John's 

•'Wilmington, St. Paul's 

Windsor, St. Thomas 



THIRD 



Ayden, St. James' 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 

Belhaven, St. James' 

Bonnerton, St. John's 

Clinton, St. Paul's 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 

♦Hamilton, St. Martin's 

Roper, St. Luke's 

C-juthport, St. Philip's 

Williamston, Advent 

Winton, St. John's 

Columbia, St. Andrews 

Farmville, Emmanuel 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas 

♦Warsaw, Calvary 

Whiteville, Grace 

Yeatsville, St. Matthew's - 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's 
Swan Quarter, Calvary 



FOURTH 



Atkinson, St. Thomas' 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Bath, St. Thomas' 

Chocowinity, Trinity 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church __ 

Jossama, Zion 

♦Lake Landing, St. George's — . 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 

♦Red Springs, St. Stephen's 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

♦Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 

Wilmington, St. Mark's 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 

Bunyan, St. Stephen's 

♦Edenton, St. John's 

Edward, Redeemer 

♦Elizabeth City, St. Philip's ___ 

Fairfield, All Saint's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 

Lumberton, Trinity 

North West, All Soul's 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Trenton, Grace Church 

♦Washington, St. Paul's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrev/'s 

♦Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

♦Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 



; 3000.00 


$ 2,900.00 


$ 100.00 


11040.00 


11,326.93 


880.02 


500.00 


439.50 


61.00 


100.00 


100.54 




200.00 


180.00 


26.00 


YOO.OO 


575.00 


125.00 


2415.00 


2065.00 


350.00 


4300.00 


4300.00 




1500.00 


1026.40 


61.64 


2100.00 


1300.00 


200.00 


1000.00 


866.91 


133.09 


2500.00 


38.19 


100.00 


4000.00 


2050.00 


454.29 


700.00 


100.00 


75.00 


4500.00 


4088.14 


411.86 


3000.00 


2338.04 


182.55 


1995.00 


1505.99 


182.84 


800.00 


523.30 


76.70 


320.00 


283.00 


37.00 


600.00 


522.99 


78.01 


500.00 


400.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 




400.00 


344.81 


55.19 


200.00 


181.30 


18.70 


200.00 




40.00 


350.00 


290.00 


60.00 


250.00 


150.00 


100.00 


500.00 


465.00 


35.00 


200.00 


185.00 


15.00 


300.00 


250.00 


50.00 


530.00 


453.28 


76.72 


125.00 


109.50 


17.55 


200.00 


200.00 




80.00 


40.00 




90.00 


65.00 


25.00 


100.00 


65.00 


35.00 


100.00 


85.51 


14.49 


70.00 


84.15 


7.21 


60.00 


60.00 


12.30 


100.00 


100.00 




500.00 


445.00 


55.00 


100.00 


95.25 


4.75 


100.00 


85.97 


14.03 


200.00 


180.00 


20.00 


250.00 


222.86. 


27.14 


150.00 


130.00 


20.00 


. 125.00 


101.90 
42.61 


23.40 


250.00 


14.54 


400.00 


350.00 


50.00 


100.00 


45.00 


12.40 


240.00 


217.56 


22.50 


100.00 


12.00 


7.24 


300.00 


206.99 


283.00 


400.00 


390.00 


10.00 


105.00 


105.00 




25.00 


25.00 




150.00 


110.00 


18.75 


25.00 


25.00 





50.00 


7.75 


7.00 


25.00 


10.00 


15.00 


50.00 


50.00 




50.00 


40.00 


10.00 


100.00 


100.00 




50.00 


50.00 




30.00 


30.00 




75.00 


72.50 


5.00 


125.00 


83.00 


42.00 


150.00 


90.46 


9.46 


100.00 


45.88 


54.77 


50.00 


14.50 


6.00 


40.00 


30.00 


10.25 


100.00 


87.50 


12.50 


50.00 


27.00 


3.00 


50.00 


50.00 





Kinston, Christ Church 

Murfrecsboro, St. Barnabas' 

Oriental, St. Thomas' 

Pikeville, Mission 

♦PoUocksville, Mission 

Bobersonville, Mission 

Roper, St. Ann's 

"Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's .. 

Williamston, St. Ignatius' 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission 

Wrightsville, "MeCumber's" Mission 



75.00 


62.50 


30.00 


50.00 


60.00 




10.00 


10.00 




50.00 


50.00 




48.00 


36.00 


5.56 


25.00 


25.00 




25.00 


16.34 


8.66 


65.00 






30.00 


21.68 


8.32 


15.00 


10.00 


5.00 


20.00 


20.00 





Total $55,428.00 $42,207.79 $4,983.49 

Total paid by parishes, missions, and Church Schools $47,191.28 

Balance unpaid for year 1926 8,23S.72 

''Failed to pay full apportionment. 



DARE WE PREACH THE GOSPEL? 

"Give me," cried an eminent divine, "give me 200 strong, 
consecrated men, and I will convert this whole ciby to 
Christ." 

This challenge struck fire; the g-reat congregation was 
electrified; and 200 men swarmed eagerly around the 
preacher. Then, what happened? An anti-climax! The 
great pulpit orator was painfully embarrassed — he ac- 
tually did not know what to do with this splendid army 
of volunteers. 

Although enacted a genevaticn ago, this same scene 
might easily be repeated today. Where is the pastor who 
can postpone budgets and put 200 men to work on practi- 
cal evangelism? This is a crucial question, indeed, for 
the approaching Bishops' Crusade. 

"Personal Religion" is proclaimed as the keynote of the 
Crusade. But the "200" know, if they know anything, 
that personal religion cannot live a healthy life in our an^ 
ti-Chiistian social system. The Golden Rule may be 
preached on Sunday, but it is quickly neutralized, from 
Monday to Saturda,y, by the relentless Rule of Gold. 

In fact, the Church itself is confessedly s'jbsei-vient to 
Mammon, as recent events have repeatedly proven. This 
condition makes for a sickly pulpit. It is afraid to de- 
nounce Mammon, the god of 20th century civilization, and 
so it finds employment in various vagaries. Yet there are 
myi'iads who are yearning for a leadership which will 
preach and practice the Christianity of Christ. 

Don't let us deceive ourselves by new names. We have 
had the "Men and Religion Forward Movement," the 
"Nation-Wide Preaching Mission," and what not? Is the 
"Bishops' Crusade" to be nothing more? Instead of 
"launching out into the deep," will it merely do, as the for- 
mer movements have done, i. e. angle in parochial ponds 
and catch a few gold fish? 

God pity us, if that is all. But if the Church means busi- 
ness, the "Father's business," it will heed the call for a 
new orientation. It will demand the enforcement of 
Christ's principles in all social activities, all the days of 
the week. And that demand will spell "fight." 

"A fight!" How fascinating is a fight! And if the 
Church actually becomes militant, strong men will crowd 
its doors. "The Almighty Saviour against systematic 
Mammon," will be the slogan to attract red blood while it 
expels the merciless money-changers. 

We've bad enough of dress parades and jewelled crosses. 
Now let us raise the rough-hewn Cross of Calvary. Will 
the Bishops' Crusade dare? — James L. Smiley, Annapolis, 
Md , in a letter to the New York Churchman. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD. 



MEMORIALS 



MARY LATHAM LAUGHINGHOUSE. 

On the morning of January 4th, 1927, the soul of Mary 
Latham Laughinghouse passed within the veil and awak- 
ened in the glory of her Master's presence. 

The Woman's Auxiliary of St. Peter's Church, Wash- 
ington, N. C, of which for many years she was a loyal 
member, sorrows at her passing, yet rejoices that she is 
at rest in the "Haven where she would be." 

Mrs. Laughinghouse was a true daughter of the Church, 
faithful to her obligations, and in attendance on its ser- 
vices to worship her God "in the beauty of holiness." 

The Woman's Auxiliary will ever be mindful of her pre- 
sence for, "Though she is dead, yet she liveth." For those 
who loved her abides deepest sympathy and understanding, 
and though there is grief within their hearts, "underneath 
are the Everlasting Arms." 

Now, we do Resolve, That a copy of these resolutions be 
spread upon our minutes, a copy be sent to the bereaved 
family, a copy to the Washington Progress, and a copy to 
the Mission Herald. 

MRS. W. B. MORTON, 

MISS JULIA HOYT, 

MRS. JOHN GRAY BLOUNT, 

Committee. 



NEWS OF EMMANUEL PARISH, FARMVILLE, N. C. 



The educational meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary, 
held on January 24th, at the home of Mrs. W. C. Askew, 
was devoted to the study of the Bishops' Crusade in anti- 
cipation of the mission to be conducted locally during the 
week of February 14th ,by the Rev. G. F. Hill, of Eliza- 
beth City. 

The Educational Secretary, Mrs. J. L. Shackleford, had 
charge of the inspiring program which consisted of: 

Hymn 83, followed by the Creed and a circle of prayers 
and another hymn, "O Lamb of God, Still Keep Me." Mrs. 
C. E. Beaman then gave the Meditation and Objectives of 
the Bishops' Crusade. Mrs. A. S. Bynum gave some 
"Suggestions for the Woman's Auxiliary in the Crusade," 
and Mrs. J. W. Joyner read an article entitled, "The Bish- 
ops Are Coming," by the Rev. Mr. Atwater. Two selec- 
tions by Bishop Darst, "Too Many on the Side Lines," and 
"The Call to The Colors," were read by Mrs. G. A. Jones, 
and a resume by the rector, the Rev. H. G. England 
brought the program to an end. 

The Auxiliary then voted to purchase for distribution 
in the Parish a number of leaflets as part of the work 
suggested for the Woman's Auxiliary by the Church at 
Work, and pledged itself to pray most earnestly several 
times a day for the success of the movement. 

The Crusade Mass Meeting to be held in Washington, 
N, C. was discussed and a committee was appointed to stir 
up interest and arrange automoble parties. 

Another meeting for the purpose of learning more about 
the Crusade and thus arouse more enthusiasm was planned 
for the following Monday. A prayer meeting was also 
arranged to be held in the church the Monday afternoon 
before the Mission starts that evening. 

The meeting closed with the pledge of allegiance: "I 
pledge allegiance to the Cross and to the Church for which 



it stands, for I am not ashamed to confess the faith of 
Christ crucified and manfully to fight under His banner 
against sin, the world and the devil, and to continue 
Christ's faithful soldier and servant unto my life's end." 

The Auxiliary stated in its annual report that all obli- 
gations during the year 1926 had been met and that the 
sum of $306.00, made by the sale of Christmas cards, 
and at the annual bazzar and other benefits, had swelled 
the parish house fund to $1000.00. 

Our new rector, the Rev. H. G. England, has recently 
received his household goods from Washington, D. C, and 
has made a temporary rectory — we hope to build a rectory 
soon — of the house formerly occupied by E. L. Barrett on 
Green Street. Mrs. England is expected February 1st, at 
which time the annual parish dinner will be held. This 
event has been postponed in anticipation of her arrival. 
Mr England has been quite busy calling on his new par- 
ishioners, shaping the different groups, and preparing his 
congregation for the Crusade. Mr. England, who was 
formerly a missioner, will hold missions in Swan Quarter 
and Sunbury. 



SOME OF HAPPENINGS AT MEETING OF THE 
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 



Mr. Thomas D. Meares, diocesan treasurer, reported to 
the Executive Council, which met in Wilmington, N. C, 
January 27th, 1927, that East Carolina paid in full its 
General Church obligation for the year 1926, and pointed 
out that the diocese is in excellent financial condition for 
this time of the year. 

The Committee on Church Insurance, of which the Rev. 
J. B. Gibble, of Wilmington, is chairman, made its re- 
port for the year 1926, calling attention to the fact that 
several parishes and missions have failed to pay insur- 
ance premiums. The matter was referred to the Commit- 
tee on Evaluation for such action as it deemed necessary. 

The Special Committee, which was appointed to raise 
$7,000.00 for Thompson Orphanage, reported that the goal 
had not been reached, but hoped to make a fuller report 
at a later meeting. 

It will be remembered that the Executive Council adopt- 
ed, not long ago, a resolution to the eff'ect that the mis- 
sionary clergy of the diocese would have their salaries 
reduced to the extent their respective parishes and mis- 
sions failed to pay their diocesan apportionments. It will 
be seen from the financial statement, printed on another 
page, that practically all the parishes and missio